HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Apuleius
Apuleius
Apuleius
(/ˌæpjʊˈliːəs/; also called Lucius Apuleius Madaurensis; c. 124 – c. 170 AD)[1] was a Latin-language prose writer, Platonist
Platonist
philosopher and rhetorician.[2] He was a Numidian who lived under the Roman Empire[3] and was from Madauros
Madauros
(now M'Daourouch, Algeria). He studied Platonism in Athens, travelled to Italy, Asia Minor, and Egypt, and was an initiate in several cults or mysteries. The most famous incident in his life was when he was accused of using magic to gain the attentions (and fortune) of a wealthy widow. He declaimed and then distributed a witty tour de force in his own defense before the proconsul and a court of magistrates convened in Sabratha, near ancient Tripoli, Libya. This is known as the Apologia. His most famous work is his bawdy picaresque novel, the Metamorphoses, otherwise known as The Golden Ass
[...More...]

"Apuleius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Lucius Appuleius Saturninus
Lucius Appuleius Saturninus
Lucius Appuleius Saturninus
(died late 100 BC) was a Roman populist and tribune. He is most notable for introducing a series of legislative reforms, alongside his associate Gaius Servilius Glaucia and with the consent of the famous Gaius Marius, during the last years of the second century BC. Senatorial opposition to these laws eventually led to an internal crisis, the declaration of the senatus consultum ultimum, and the deaths of Saturninus, Glaucia, and their followers in 100 BC.Contents1 Biography1.1 Quaestor 1.2 First Tribuneship 1.3 Second Tribuneship 1.4 Downfall and death2 Descendants 3 Bibliography 4 ReferencesBiography[edit] Quaestor[edit] As quaestor (104 BC) he superintended the imports of grain at Ostia, but was removed by the Roman Senate
Roman Senate
(an unusual proceeding), and replaced by Marcus Aemilius Scaurus, one of the chief members of the Optimates
[...More...]

"Lucius Appuleius Saturninus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rome
Rome
Rome
(/roʊm/ ROHM; Italian: Roma i[ˈroːma]; Latin: Roma [ˈroːma]) is the capital of Italy
Italy
and a special comune (named Comune
Comune
di Roma Capitale). Rome
Rome
also serves as the capital of the Lazio
Lazio
region. With 2,874,558 residents in 1,285 km2 (496.1 sq mi),[1] it is also the country's most populated comune. It is the fourth-most populous city in the European Union
European Union
by population within city limits. It is the centre of the Metropolitan City of Rome, which has a population of 4.3 million residents.[2] Rome
Rome
is located in the central-western portion of the Italian Peninsula, within Lazio (Latium), along the shores of the Tiber
[...More...]

"Rome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Numidia
French Algeria
Algeria
(19th - 20th centuries)French conquest French governorsResistance PacificationEmir Abdelkader Fatma N'SoumerMokrani Revolt Cheikh BouamamaNationalism RCUA FLN GPRAAlgerian War 1958 putsch 1961 putschÉvian Accords Independence referendumPied-Noir Harkis Oujda GroupContemporary era 1960s–80sArab nationalism 1965 putschBerber Spring 1988 Riots1990s Algerian Civil War
[...More...]

"Numidia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Romanization (cultural)
Romanization or Latinization (or Romanisation or Latinisation: see spelling differences), in the historical and cultural meanings of both terms, indicate different historical processes, such as acculturation, integration and assimilation of newly incorporated and peripheral populations by the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and the later Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Romanization (cultural)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Praenomen
The praenomen (Classical Latin: [ˈprae̯:.noː.mɛn]; plural: praenomina) was a personal name chosen by the parents of a Roman child. It was first bestowed on the dies lustricus (day of lustration), the eighth day after the birth of a girl, or the ninth day after the birth of a boy. The praenomen would then be formally conferred a second time when girls married, or when boys assumed the toga virilis upon reaching manhood. Although it was the oldest of the tria nomina commonly used in Roman naming conventions, by the late republic, most praenomina were so common that most people were called by their praenomina only by family or close friends. For this reason, although they continued to be used, praenomina gradually disappeared from public records during imperial times
[...More...]

"Praenomen" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Duumviri
The duumviri (Latin for "two men"), originally duoviri and also known in English as the duumvirs, were any of various joint magistrates of ancient Rome. Such pairs of magistrates were appointed at various periods of Roman history both in Rome itself and in the colonies and municipia.[1] Duumviri iuri or iure dicundo were the highest judicial magistrates in the cities of Italy and its provinces. Their chief duties were concerned with the administration of justice.[1] The activities of these individuals are described in the local statutes such as Lex Julia, Lex Irnitana,[2] Lex Malacitana, Lex Rubria, Lex Coloniae, and Genetivae Iuliae. The office was determined by election and lasted one year. Combined with the duumviri aediles, they formed the quattuorviri, a board of four officials
[...More...]

"Duumviri" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sestertius
The sestertius (plural sestertii), or sesterce (plural sesterces), was an ancient Roman coin. During the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
it was a small, silver coin issued only on rare occasions. During the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
it was a large brass coin. The name sestertius means "two and one half", referring to its nominal value of two and a half asses (a bronze Roman coin, singular as), a value that was useful for commerce because it was one quarter of a denarius, a coin worth ten asses. The name is derived from semis, "half" and "tertius", "third", in which "third" refers to the third as: the sestertius was worth two full asses and half of a third. English-language sources routinely use the original Latin form sestertius, plural sestertii; but older literature frequently uses sesterce, plural sesterces, terce being the English equivalent of tertius
[...More...]

"Sestertius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Carthage
Carthage
Carthage
(/ˈkɑːrθɪdʒ/, from Latin: Carthago; Phoenician: Qart-ḥadašt ("New city")) was the center or capital city of the ancient Carthaginian civilization, on the eastern side of the Lake of Tunis
Tunis
in what is now the Tunis Governorate
Tunis Governorate
in Tunisia. The city developed from a Phoenician colony into the capital of an empire dominating the Mediterranean during the first millennium BC.[1] The legendary Queen Dido
Dido
is regarded as the founder of the city, though her historicity has been questioned. According to accounts by Timaeus of Tauromenium, she purchased from a local tribe the amount of land that could be covered by an oxhide
[...More...]

"Carthage" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Rhetoric
Rhetoric
Rhetoric
is the art of discourse, wherein a writer or speaker strives to inform, persuade or motivate particular audiences in specific situations. It can also be in a visual form; as a subject of formal study and a productive civic practice, rhetoric has played a central role in the European tradition.[1] Its best known definition comes from Aristotle, who considers it a counterpart of both logic and politics, and calls it "the faculty of observing in any given case the available means of persuasion."[2] Rhetoric
Rhetoric
typically provides heuristics for understanding, discovering, and developing arguments for particular situations, such as Aristotle's three persuasive audience appeals, logos, pathos, and ethos. The five canons of rhetoric, which trace the traditional tasks in designing a persuasive speech, were first codified in classical Rome: invention, arrangement, style, memory, and delivery
[...More...]

"Rhetoric" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tripoli
Tripoli
Tripoli
(Arabic: طرابلس‎, Ṭarābulus; Berber:"Oea" or "Wy't" ) is the capital city and the largest city of Libya, with a population of about 1.1 million people in 2015.[1] It is located in the northwest of Libya
Libya
on the edge of the desert, on a point of rocky land projecting into the Mediterranean and forming a bay. It includes the port of Tripoli
Tripoli
and the country's largest commercial and manufacturing centre. It is also the site of the University of Tripoli. The vast Bab al-Azizia barracks, which includes the former family estate of Muammar Gaddafi, is also located in the city. Colonel
Colonel
Gaddafi largely ruled the country from his residence in this barracks. Tripoli
Tripoli
was founded in the 7th century BC by the Phoenicians, who named it Oea.[2] Due to the city's long history, there are many sites of archaeological significance in Tripoli
[...More...]

"Tripoli" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Dionysian Mysteries
The Dionysian Mysteries
Dionysian Mysteries
were a ritual of ancient Greece
Greece
and Rome which used intoxicants and other trance-inducing techniques (like dance and music) to remove inhibitions and social constraints, liberating the individual to return to a natural state. It also provided some liberation for those marginalized by Greek society: women, slaves, outlaws, and non-citizens. In their final phase the Mysteries shifted their emphasis from a chthonic, underworld orientation to a transcendental, mystical one, with Dionysus
Dionysus
changing his nature accordingly
[...More...]

"Dionysian Mysteries" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Asclepius
Asclepius
Asclepius
(/æsˈkliːpiəs/; Greek: Ἀσκληπιός, Asklēpiós [asklɛːpiós]; Latin: Aesculapius) was a hero and god of medicine in ancient Greek religion and mythology. Asclepius
Asclepius
represents the healing aspect of the medical arts; his daughters are Hygieia
Hygieia
("Hygiene", the goddess/personification of health, cleanliness, and sanitation), Iaso (the goddess of recuperation from illness), Aceso (the goddess of the healing process), Aglæa/Ægle (the goddess of the glow of good health), and Panacea
Panacea
(the goddess of universal remedy). He was associated with the Roman/Etruscan god Vediovis
Vediovis
and the Egyptian Imhotep.[1] He was one of Apollo's sons, sharing with Apollo
Apollo
the epithet Paean ("the Healer").[2] The rod of Asclepius, a snake-entwined staff, remains a symbol of medicine today
[...More...]

"Asclepius" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alexandria
Alexandria
Alexandria
(/ˌælɪɡˈzændriə/ or /-ˈzɑːnd-/;[3] Arabic: الإسكندرية al-ʾIskandariyya; Egyptian Arabic: إسكندرية Eskendria; Coptic: Ⲁⲗⲉⲝⲁⲛⲇⲣⲓⲁ, Ⲣⲁⲕⲟⲧⲉ Alexandria, Rakotə) is the second-largest city in Egypt
Egypt
and a major economic centre, extending about 32 km (20 mi) along the coast of the Mediterranean Sea
Mediterranean Sea
in the north central part of the country. Its low elevation on the Nile delta
Nile delta
makes it highly vulnerable to rising sea levels. Alexandria
Alexandria
is an important industrial center because of its natural gas and oil pipelines from Suez. Alexandria
Alexandria
is also a popular tourist destination. Alexandria
Alexandria
was founded around a small, ancient Egyptian town c. 331 BC by Alexander the Great
[...More...]

"Alexandria" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Oea
Oea ( /ˈiːə/) was an ancient city in present-day Centre ville, à le Souq, Yafran Tripoli, Libya. It was founded by the Phoenicians in the seventh century BC, and later became a Roman–Berber colony.[1] As part of the Roman Africa Nova province, Oea and surrounding Tripolitania were prosperous. It reached its height in the 2nd and 3rd centuries AD, when the city was experienced a golden age under the Severan dynasty in nearby Leptis Magna.[2] The city was conquered by the Rashidun Caliphate with the spread of Islam in the 7th century, and came to be known as Tripoli during the 9th century.Contents1 History 2 See also 3 Notes 4 BibliographyHistory[edit] The city was founded in the 7th century BC, by the Phoenicians, who gave it the Libyco-Berber name Oea (or Wy't),[3] suggesting that the city may have been built upon an existing native Berber village
[...More...]

"Oea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Frame Story
A frame story (also known as a frame tale or frame narrative) is a literary technique that sometimes serves as a companion piece to a story within a story, whereby an introductory or main narrative is presented, at least in part, for the purpose of setting the stage either for a more emphasized second narrative or for a set of shorter stories. The frame story leads readers from a first story into another, smaller one (or several ones) within it. The frame story may also be used to allow readers to understand a part of the story, then jump to another part that can now be understood. This is not however, to be mixed up with a narrative structure or character personality change.Contents1 Origins 2 A set of stories 3 Single story 4 Use 5 Compared to reprise 6 See also 7 NotesOrigins[edit] The earliest known frame stories are those preserved on the ancient Egyptian Papyrus Westcar
[...More...]

"Frame Story" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.