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Apple III
The Apple III
Apple III
(often styled as apple ///) is a business-oriented personal computer produced and released by Apple Computer in 1980. It was intended as the successor to the Apple II
Apple II
series, but was largely considered a failure in the market. Development work on the Apple III
Apple III
started in late 1978 under the guidance of Dr. Wendell Sander
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QWERTY
QWERTY
QWERTY
is a keyboard design for Latin-script alphabets. The name comes from the order of the first six keys on the top left letter row of the keyboard (Q W E R T Y). The QWERTY
QWERTY
design is based on a layout created for the " href="../php/SummaryGet.php?FindGo=Sholes_and_Glidden_typewriter " style= " text-decoration:none; color:#000060; " target="_blank"> Sholes and Glidden typewriter " height="200 " width="122.90502793296";>
Sholes and Glidden typewriter
and sold to Remington in 1873. It became popular with the success of the Remington No
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Federal Communications Commission
The Federal Communications Commission
Federal Communications Commission
(FCC) is an independent agency of the United States government created by statute (47 U.S.C. § 151 and 47 U.S.C. § 154) to regulate interstate communications by radio, television, wire, satellite, and cable. The FCC
FCC
works towards six goals in the areas of broadband, competition, the spectrum, the media, public safety and homeland security, and modernizing itself.[4] The FCC
FCC
was formed by the Communications Act of 1934
Communications Act of 1934
to replace the radio regulation functions of the Federal Radio Commission. The FCC took over wire communication regulation from the Interstate Commerce Commission. The FCC's mandated jurisdiction covers the 50 states, the District of Columbia, and the Territories of the United States
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United States Dollar
 United States  East Timor[2][Note 1]  Ecuador[3][Note 2]  El Salvador[4]  Federated States of Micronesia  Marshall Islands  Palau  Panama[Note 3]  Zimbabwe[Note 4]3 non-U.S
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MultiPlan
Multiplan
Multiplan
was an early spreadsheet program developed by Microsoft. Known initially by the code name "EP" (for "Electronic Paper"), it was introduced in 1982 as a competitor for VisiCalc. Multiplan
Multiplan
was released first for computers running CP/M; it was developed using a Microsoft
Microsoft
proprietary p-code C compiler[1] as part of a portability strategy that facilitated ports to systems such as MS-DOS, Xenix, Commodore 64
Commodore 64
and 128, Texas Instruments TI-99/4A
Texas Instruments TI-99/4A
(on four 6K GROMs and a single 8K ROM), Radio Shack TRS-80
TRS-80
Model II, TRS-80
TRS-80
Model 4, TRS-80
TRS-80
Model 100 (on ROM), Apple II, and Burroughs B-20 series
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MS-DOS
MS- DOS
DOS
(/ˌɛmˌɛsˈdɒs/ em-ess-DOSS; acronym for Microsoft
Microsoft
Disk Operating System) is an operating system for x86-based personal computers mostly developed by Microsoft. Collectively, MS-DOS, its rebranding as IBM PC
IBM PC
DOS, and some operating systems attempting to be compatible with MS-DOS, are sometimes referred to as "DOS" (which is also the generic acronym for disk operating system)
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PC DOS
IBM
IBM
PC DOS
DOS
(an acronym for IBM
IBM
personal computer disk operating system) is a discontinued operating system for the IBM
IBM
Personal Computer, manufactured and sold by IBM
IBM
from the early 1980s into the 2000s. Before version 6.1, PC DOS
DOS
was an IBM-branded version of MS-DOS
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16-bit
In computer architecture, 16-bit integers, memory addresses, or other data units are those that are 16 bits (2 octets) wide. Also, 16-bit CPU and ALU architectures are those that are based on registers, address buses, or data buses of that size. 16-bit microcomputers are computers in which 16-bit microprocessors were the norm. A 16-bit register can store 216 different values. The signed range of integer values that can be stored in 16 bits is −32,768 (−1 × 215) through 32,767 (215 − 1); the unsigned range is 0 through 65,535 (216 − 1). Since 216 is 65,536, a processor with 16-bit memory addresses can directly access 64 KB (65,536 bytes) of byte-addressable memory
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IBM
IBM
IBM
(International Business
Business
Machines Corporation) is an American multinational technology company headquartered in Armonk, New York, United States, with operations in over 170 countries. The company originated in 1911 as the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company
Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company
(CTR) and was renamed "International Business
Business
Machines" in 1924. IBM
IBM
manufactures and markets computer hardware, middleware and software, and provides hosting and consulting services in areas ranging from mainframe computers to nanotechnology. IBM
IBM
is also a major research organization, holding the record for most U.S
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Radio Frequency Interference
Electromagnetic interference
Electromagnetic interference
(EMI), also called radio-frequency interference (RFI) when in the radio frequency spectrum, is a disturbance generated by an external source that affects an electrical circuit by electromagnetic induction, electrostatic coupling, or conduction.[1] The disturbance may degrade the performance of the circuit or even stop it from functioning. In the case of a data path, these effects can range from an increase in error rate to a total loss of the data.[2] Both man-made and natural sources generate changing electrical currents and voltages that can cause EMI: ignition systems, cellular network of mobile phones, lightning, solar flares, and auroras (Northern/Southern Lights)
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8-bit
In computer architecture, 8-bit integers, memory addresses, or other data units are those that are 8 bits (1 octet) wide. Also, 8-bit CPU and ALU architectures are those that are based on registers, address buses, or data buses of that size. 8-bit is also a generation of microcomputers in which 8-bit microprocessors were the norm. The IBM System/360
IBM System/360
introduced byte-addressable memory with 8-bit bytes, as opposed to bit-addressable or decimal digit-addressable or word-addressable memory, although its general purpose registers were 32 bits wide, and addresses were contained in the lower 24 bits of those addresses
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Market Segmentation
Market segmentation
Market segmentation
is the process of dividing a broad consumer or business market, normally consisting of existing and potential customers, into sub-groups of consumers (known as segments) based on some type of shared characteristics. In dividing or segmenting markets, researchers typically look for common characteristics such as shared needs, common interests, similar lifestyles or even similar demographic profiles. The overall aim of segmentation is to identify high yield segments – that is, those segments that are likely to be the most profitable or that have growth potential – so that these can be selected for special attention (i.e. become target markets). Many different ways to segment a market have been identified. Business-to-business
Business-to-business
(B2B) sellers might segment the market into different types of businesses or countries
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Megahertz
The hertz (symbol: Hz) is the derived unit of frequency in the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) and is defined as one cycle per second.[1] It is named for Heinrich Rudolf Hertz, the first person to provide conclusive proof of the existence of electromagnetic waves. Hertz
Hertz
are commonly expressed in multiples: kilohertz (103 Hz, kHz), megahertz (106 Hz, MHz), gigahertz (109 Hz, GHz), and terahertz (1012 Hz, THz). Some of the unit's most common uses are in the description of sine waves and musical tones, particularly those used in radio- and audio-related applications
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Bank Switching
Bank switching
Bank switching
is a technique used in computer design to increase the amount of usable memory beyond the amount directly addressable by the processor.[1] It can be used to configure a system differently at different times; for example, a ROM required to start a system from diskette could be switched out when no longer needed. In video game systems, bank switching allowed larger games to be developed for play on existing consoles. Bank switching
Bank switching
originated in minicomputer systems.[2] Many modern microcontrollers and microprocessors use bank switching to manage random-access memory, non-volatile memory, input-output devices and system management registers in small embedded systems. The technique was common in 8-bit microcomputer systems
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Kilobyte
The kilobyte is a multiple of the unit byte for digital information. The International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) defines the prefix kilo as 1000 (103); per this definition, one kilobyte is 1000 bytes.[1] The internationally recommended unit symbol for the kilobyte is kB.[1] In some areas of information technology, particularly in reference to digital memory capacity, kilobyte instead denotes 1024 (210) bytes. This arises from the powers-of-two sizing common to memory circuit design. In this context, the symbols K and KB are often used.Contents1 Definitions and usage1.1 1000 bytes 1.2 1024 bytes1.2.1 Kibibyte2 Examples 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesDefinitions and usage[edit] 1000 bytes[edit] In the International System of Units
International System of Units
(SI) the prefix kilo means 1000 (103); therefore, one kilobyte is 1000 bytes
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MOS Technology 6502
The MOS Technology
MOS Technology
6502 (typically "sixty-five-oh-two" or "six-five-oh-two")[3] is an 8-bit microprocessor that was designed by a small team led by Chuck Peddle for MOS Technology. When it was introduced in 1975, the 6502 was, by a considerable margin, the least expensive microprocessor on the market. It initially sold for less than one-sixth the cost of competing designs from larger companies, such as Motorola
Motorola
and Intel, and caused rapid decreases in pricing across the entire processor market. Along with the Zilog Z80, it sparked a series of projects that resulted in the home computer revolution of the early 1980s. Popular home video game consoles and computers, such as the Atari 2600, Atari 8-bit family, Apple II, Nintendo
Nintendo
Entertainment System, Commodore 64, and others, used the 6502 or variations of the basic design
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