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Appian (other)
Appian
Appian
of Alexandria
Alexandria
(/ˈæpiən/; Greek: Ἀππιανὸς Ἀλεξανδρεύς Appianòs Alexandreús; Latin: Appianus Alexandrinus; c. 95 – c. AD 165) was a Greek historian with Roman citizenship who flourished during the reigns of Emperors of Rome Trajan, Hadrian, and Antoninus Pius. He was born c. 95 in Alexandria. After holding the chief offices in the province of Aegyptus (Egypt), he went to Rome
Rome
c. 120, where he practised as an advocate, pleading cases before the emperors (probably as advocatus fisci).[1] It was in 147 at the earliest that he was appointed to the office of procurator, probably in Egypt, on the recommendation of his friend Marcus Cornelius Fronto, a well-known litterateur
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Horace White (writer)
Horace White (August 10, 1834 – September 16, 1916) was a United States journalist and financial expert, noted for his connection with the Chicago Tribune, the New York Evening Post, and The Nation.Contents1 Biography 2 Works2.1 Original work 2.2 Translations 2.3 Editor3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] White was born at Colebrook, New Hampshire. His father was a Doctor. In 1837 his family moved to Beloit, Wisconsin, and White graduated at Beloit College in 1853. In 1854, he became city editor of the Chicago Evening Journal. In 1856-57 he served as assistant secretary of the National Kansas Committee. As a reporter for the Chicago Tribune he accompanied Abraham Lincoln in 1858 in his campaign against Stephen A. Douglas, his account being published in Herndon's Life of Lincoln. As a result, he became friends with Lincoln and Henry Villard
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Co-regency
A coregency or co-principality is the situation where a monarchical position (such as king, queen, emperor or empress), normally held by only a single person, is held by two or more. It is to be distinguished from diarchies or duumvirates such as ancient Sparta and Rome where monarchal power is formally divided between two rulers.Contents1 Historical examples1.1 Ancient Egypt 1.2 Gonghe Regency 1.3 Sweden 1.4 Britain 1.5 Lithuania2 Date discrepancies 3 References 4 See alsoHistorical examples[edit] Historical examples of this include the coregency of Frederick I of Austria and Louis the Bavarian
Louis the Bavarian
over the Kingdom of Germany. Jure uxoris Kings in Kingdoms such as Spain
Spain
and Portugal
Portugal
can also be found (Ferdinand V and Isabella I of Castile, Philip I and Joanna of Castile, Peter III and Maria I of Portugal, etc.)
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Erhard Ratdolt
Erhard Ratdolt
Erhard Ratdolt
(1442–1528) was an early German printer from Augsburg.[1] He was active as a printer in Venice
Venice
from 1476 to 1486, and afterwards in Augsburg. From 1475[1] to 1478 he was in partnership with two other German printers.[1] The first book the partnership produced was the Calendarium (1476), written and previously published by Regiomontanus, which offered one of the earliest examples of a modern title page. Other noteworthy publications are the Historia Romana of Appianus
Appianus
(1477), and the first edition of Euclid's Elements
Euclid's Elements
(1482), where he solved the problem of printing geometric diagrams, the Poeticon astronomicon, also from 1482, Haly Abenragel
Haly Abenragel
(1485),[2] and Alchabitius (1503)
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Ethnographic
Ethnography
Ethnography
(from Greek ἔθνος ethnos "folk, people, nation" and γράφω grapho "I write") is the systematic study of people and cultures. It is designed to explore cultural phenomena where the researcher observes society from the point of view of the subject of the study. An ethnography is a means to represent graphically and in writing the culture of a group
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Editio Princeps
In classical scholarship, the editio princeps (plural: editiones principes) of a work is the first printed edition of the work, that previously had existed only in manuscripts, which could be circulated only after being copied by hand. For example, the editio princeps of Homer
Homer
is that of Demetrius Chalcondyles, now thought to be from 1488. The most important texts of classical Greek and Roman authors were for the most part produced in editiones principes in the years on either side of 1500; the printing press itself was introduced into Europe around 1440, two centuries after its invention in East Asia around 1234.[1][2] In some cases there were possibilities of partial publication, of publication first in translation (for example from Greek to Latin), and of a usage that simply equates with first edition
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Johann Schweighäuser
Johann Schweighäuser (German: [ˈʃvaɪkˌhɔɪzɐ]; French: Jean Geoffroy Schweighaeuser; June 25, 1742 – January 19, 1830), was a French classical scholar.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Family 4 Bibliography 5 References 6 SourcesBiography[edit] He was born at Strasbourg, the son of a pastor of the church of Saint Thomas. From an early age his favourite subjects were philosophy (especially Scottish moral philosophy as represented by John Hutchinson and Adam Ferguson) and Oriental languages; Greek and Latin he took up later, and although he owes his reputation to his editions of Greek authors, he was always diffident as to his classical attainments. After visiting Paris, London and the principal cities of Germany, he became assistant professor of philosophy (1770) at University of Strasbourg.[1] When the French Revolution broke out, he was banished; in 1794 he returned, and after the reorganization of the Academy in 1809 was appointed professor of Greek
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August Immanuel Bekker
August Immanuel Bekker
August Immanuel Bekker
(21 May 1785 – 7 June 1871) was a German philologist and critic.Contents1 Biography 2 Notes 3 References 4 Further readingBiography[edit] Born in Berlin, Bekker completed his classical education at the University of Halle
University of Halle
under Friedrich August Wolf, who considered him as his most promising pupil. In 1810 he was appointed professor of philosophy in the University of Berlin. For several years, between 1810 and 1821, he travelled in France, Italy, England and parts of Germany, examining classical manuscripts and gathering materials for his great editorial labours. [1] Some of the fruits of his researches were published in the Anecdota Graeca (3 vols, 1814–1821),[2] but the major results are to be found in the enormous array of classical authors edited by him
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Bibliotheca Teubneriana
The Bibliotheca Teubneriana, or Teubner editions of Greek and Latin texts, comprise the most thorough modern collection ever published of ancient (and some medieval) Greco-Roman literature
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Collection Budé
The Collection Budé, or the Collection des Universités de France, is a series of books comprising the Greek and Latin classics up to the middle of the 6th century (before Emperor Justinian). It is published by Les Belles Lettres, and is sponsored by the Association Guillaume Budé. Each title of the series includes an introduction, notes and a critical apparatus, as well as a facing-page French translation, comparable to the Loeb Classical Library
Loeb Classical Library
in the English-speaking world, but with considerably more detailed introductions, apparatus, and critical or explanatory annotations. Some titles even comprise full-scale commentaries. The Greek authors in the series can be recognized by a yellow cover on which Athena's little owl can be seen, the Latin ones by a red one where one finds a she-wolf reminiscent of the Capitoline Wolf
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William Barker (translator)
William Barker (fl. 1572) was an English translator.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] Barker was born before 1522 and educated in the University of Cambridge at the cost of Queen Anne Boleyn, the second wife of Henry VIII of England. He appears to have commenced M.A. in 1540 and to have been a member either of Christ's College or of St. John's College.[1] After some years spent travelling in Italy, he published Epitaphia et inscriptiones lugubres. He then served as one of the members for Great Yarmouth in the parliaments which met in January 1557/8, January 1558/9, and April 1571 and was M.P. for Bramber in 1562/3.[2] He was one of the Duke of Norfolk's secretaries, and was deeply implicated in that nobleman's plots. About 4 September 1571, as a result of the discovery of the Ridolfi Plot, he was committed to the Tower of London
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Shakespeare
William Shakespeare
Shakespeare
(/ˈʃeɪkspɪər/; 26 April 1564 (baptised) – 23 April 1616)[a] was an English poet, playwright and actor, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist.[2][3][4] He is often called England's national poet and the "Bard of Avon".[5][b] His extant works, including collaborations, consist of approximately 39 plays,[c] 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems and a few other verses, some of uncertain authorship. His plays have been translated into every major living language and are performed more often than those of any other playwright.[7] Shakespeare
Shakespeare
was born and brought up in Stratford-upon-Avon, Warwickshire. At the age of 18, he married Anne Hathaway, with whom he had three children: Susanna and twins Hamnet and Judith
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James Leigh Strachan-Davidson
James Leigh Strachan-Davidson (born Strachan) (22 October 1843 – 28 March 1916) was an English classical scholar, born at Byfleet, Surrey, southern England.[1] Strachan-Davidson was educated at Leamington College and at Balliol College, Oxford. He graduated from Oxford with first-class honours in both Classical Moderations (1864) and Literae Humaniores (1866).[2] He was appointed Fellow and Classical Tutor at Balliol in 1872 and was Master of the college from 1907.[3] He received the honorary degree of Doctor of Laws from the universities of St Andrews and Glasgow. His publications include an edition of Selections from Polybius (1888); of Appian, Civil Wars, Book I (1902); Cicero and the Fall of the Roman Republic (1894); Problems of the Roman Criminal Law (two volumes, 1914, available online: Volume 1 and Volume 2. References[edit]^ Mackail, J. W. (1925). James Leigh Strachan-Davidson Master of Balliol: a Memoir. Oxford University Press
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Roman Citizen
Citizenship in ancient Rome
Rome
(Latin: civitas) was a privileged political and legal status afforded to free individuals with respect to laws, property, and governance.A male Roman citizen enjoyed a wide range of privileges and protections defined in detail by the Roman state. A citizen could, under certain exceptional circumstances, be deprived of his citizenship. Roman women had a limited form of citizenship. Though held in high regard they were not allowed to vote or stand for civil or public office. The rich might participate in public life by funding building projects or sponsoring religious ceremonies and other events. Women had the right to own property, to engage in business, and to obtain a divorce, but their legal rights varied over time
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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