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Aphrodite Pandemos
Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Pandemos (Ancient Greek: Πάνδημος; "common to all the people"), occurs as an epithet of the Greek goddess Aphrodite. This epithet can be interpreted in different ways. Plato and Pausanias describe Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Pandemos (Venus vulgivaga or popularis) as the goddess of sensual pleasures, in opposition to Aphrodite
Aphrodite
Urania, or "the heavenly Aphrodite".[1] She was represented at Elis
Elis
by Scopas riding on a ram.[2] Another interpretation is that of Aphrodite uniting all the inhabitants of a country into one social or political body
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Pandemos (butterfly)
Numerous, see textThe Nymphidiini are one of the larger tribes of metalmark butterflies (family Riodinidae). As numerous Riodinidae genera have not yet been unequivocally assigned to a tribe, the genus list is preliminary. The Theopina subtribe was formerly considered a distinct tribe Theopini. Selected genera[edit]Subtribe NymphidiinaAdelotypa Calociasma[verification needed] Calospila[verification needed] Catocyclotis Dysmathia Hypophylla Joiceya Livendula Menander Minotauros Mycastor Nymphidium Pandemos Periplacis Rodinia Setabis ZelotaeaSubtribe AricorinaAriconias AricorisSubtribe LemoniadinaJuditha Lemonias Synargis ThisbeSubtribe TheopinaArchaeonympha Behemothia Calicosama[verification needed] Protonymphidia TheopeTaxon identifiersWd: Q2674341 Fossilworks: 233698 NCBI: 124372This Riodinidae-related article is a stub
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Hetaera
Hetaira
Hetaira
/hɪˈtaɪrə/ (plural hetairai (/hɪˈtaɪraɪ/), also hetaera /hɪˈtɪrə/ (plural hetaerae /hɪˈtɪriː/), (Ancient Greek: ἑταίρα, "companion", pl. ἑταῖραι) was a type of prostitute in ancient Greece. Traditionally, historians of ancient Greece have distinguished between hetairai and pornai, another class of Greek prostitute. In contrast to pornai, who provided sex for a large number of clients in brothels or on the street, hetairai were thought to have had only a few men as clients at any one time, to have had long-term relationships with them, and to have provided companionship and intellectual stimulation as well as sex.[1] For instance, Charles Seltman
Charles Seltman
wrote in 1953 that "hetaeras were certainly in a very different class, often highly educated women".[2] More recently, however, historians have questioned the extent to which there was really a distinction between hetairai and pornai
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Dictionary Of Greek And Roman Biography And Mythology
The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology
(1849, originally published 1844 under a slightly different title) is an encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. Edited by William Smith, the dictionary spans three volumes and 3,700 pages. It is a classic work of 19th-century lexicography. The work is a companion to Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography.[1]Contents1 Authors and scope 2 Use and availability today 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksAuthors and scope[edit]Excerpt from Philolaus
Philolaus
Pythagoras book, (Charles Peter Mason, 1870)The work lists thirty-five authors in addition to the editor, who is also an author for some definitions and articles
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William Smith (lexicographer)
Sir William Smith (20 May 1813 – 7 October 1893)[1] was an English lexicographer. He also made advances in the teaching of Greek and Latin in schools.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Publications3 Honours and death 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Smith was born in Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist
Nonconformist
parents. He attended the Madras House school of John Allen in Hackney.[2] Originally destined for a theological career, he instead was articled to a solicitor. In his spare time he taught himself classics, and when he entered University College London
University College London
he carried off both the Greek and Latin prizes
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively dedicated
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Crete
Crete
Crete
(Greek: Κρήτη, Kríti ['kriti]; Ancient Greek: Κρήτη, Krḗtē) is the largest and most populous of the Greek islands, the 88th largest island in the world and the fifth largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, after Sicily, Sardinia, Cyprus, and Corsica. Crete and a number of surrounding islands and islets constitute the region of Crete
Crete
(Greek: Περιφέρεια Κρήτης), one of the 13 top-level administrative units of Greece. The capital and the largest city is Heraklion. As of 2011[update], the region had a population of 623,065. Crete
Crete
forms a significant part of the economy and cultural heritage of Greece, while retaining its own local cultural traits (such as its own poetry and music). It was once the centre of the Minoan civilisation (c. 2700–1420 BC), which is the earliest known civilisation in Europe
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Apollo
Apollo
Apollo
(Attic, Ionic, and Homeric
Homeric
Greek: Ἀπόλλων, Apollōn (GEN Ἀπόλλωνος); Doric: Ἀπέλλων, Apellōn; Arcadocypriot: Ἀπείλων, Apeilōn; Aeolic: Ἄπλουν, Aploun; Latin: Apollō) is one of the most important and complex of the Olympian deities in classical Greek and Roman religion and Greek and Roman mythology. The ideal of the kouros (a beardless, athletic youth), Apollo
Apollo
has been variously recognized as a god of music, truth and prophecy, healing, the sun and light, plague, poetry, and more. Apollo
Apollo
is the son of Zeus
Zeus
and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis
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Plutarch
Plutarch
Plutarch
(/ˈpluːtɑːrk/; Greek: Πλούταρχος, Ploútarkhos, Koine Greek: [plǔːtarkʰos]; c. CE 46 – CE 120),[1] later named, upon becoming a Roman citizen, Lucius Mestrius Plutarchus, (Λούκιος Μέστριος Πλούταρχος)[a] was a Greek biographer and essayist, known primarily for his Parallel Lives
Parallel Lives
and Moralia.[2] He is classified[3] as a Middle Platonist
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Eros
In Greek mythology, Eros
Eros
(UK: /ˈɪərɒs, ˈɛrɒs/, US: /ˈɛrɒs, ˈɛroʊs/;[2] Greek: Ἔρως, "Desire") was the Greek god
Greek god
of sexual attraction. His Roman counterpart was Cupid[3] ("desire"). Some myths make him a primordial god, while in other myths, he is the son of Aphrodite. He was one of the winged love gods, Erotes.Contents1 Etymology 2 Cult and depiction 3 Primordial god 4 Son of Aphrodite
Aphrodite
and Ares 5 Eros
Eros
and Psyche 6 Eros
Eros
in art 7 See also 8 References and sources 9 External linksEtymology[edit] The Greek ἔρως, meaning "desire," comes from ἔραμαι "to desire, love", of uncertain etymology. R. S. P
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Athenaeus
Athenaeus
Athenaeus
of Naucratis
Naucratis
(/ˌæθəˈniːəs/; Ancient Greek: Ἀθήναιος Nαυκρατίτης or Nαυκράτιος, Athēnaios Naukratitēs or Naukratios; Latin: Athenaeus
Athenaeus
Naucratita) was a Greek rhetorician and grammarian, flourishing about the end of the 2nd and beginning of the 3rd century AD. The Suda
Suda
says only that he lived in the times of Marcus Aurelius, but the contempt with which he speaks of Commodus, who died in 192, shows that he survived that emperor
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Thebes, Greece
Thebes (/θiːbz/; Ancient Greek: Θῆβαι, Thēbai, Greek pronunciation: [tʰɛ̂ːbai̯];[2] Greek: Θήβα, Thíva [ˈθiva]) is a city in Boeotia, central Greece. It played an important role in Greek myths, as the site of the stories of Cadmus, Oedipus, Dionysus
Dionysus
and others. Archaeological excavations in and around Thebes have revealed a Mycenaean settlement and clay tablets written in the Linear B
Linear B
script, indicating the importance of the site in the Bronze Age. Thebes was the largest city of the ancient region of Boeotia
Boeotia
and was the leader of the Boeotian confederacy. It was a major rival of ancient Athens, and sided with the Persians during the 480 BC invasion under Xerxes. Theban forces under the command of Epaminondas ended the power of Sparta
Sparta
at the Battle of Leuctra
Battle of Leuctra
in 371 BC
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Arcadia
Arcadia
Arcadia
(Greek: Αρκαδία, Arkadía) is one of the regional units of Greece. It is part of the administrative region of Peloponnese. It is situated in the central and eastern part of the Peloponnese peninsula. It takes its name from the mythological figure Arcas. In Greek mythology, it was the home of the god Pan
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Megalopolis, Greece
Megalopoli (Greek: Μεγαλόπολη) is a town in the southwestern part of the regional unit of Arcadia, southern Greece. It is located in the same site as ancient Megalopolis (Μεγαλόπολις). When it was founded in 371 BC, it was the first large urbanization in rustic Arcadia. Its theater had a capacity of 20,000 visitors, making it one of the largest ancient Greek theaters.[citation needed] Megalopoli has several schools, shops, churches, hotels and other services. The population of Megalopoli in 2011 was 5,779 for the town proper.A silver triobol of the Arcadian League from ancient Megalopolis
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