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Apanchomene
Apanchomene (Ancient Greek: Ἀπαγχομένη) was in Greek mythology an epithet for the goddess Artemis
Artemis
that meant "the strangled goddess" or "she who hangs herself".[1] The origin of this name is thus related by Pausanias:[2] in the neighborhood of the town of Caphyae in Arcadia, in a place called Condylea, there was a sacred grove of Artemis
Artemis
Condyleatis. On one occasion when some boys were playing in this grove, they put a string around the goddess's statue, and said in their jokes they would strangle Artemis. Some of the inhabitants of Caphyae who found the boys engaged in their sport, stoned them to death. After this occurrence, all the women of Caphyae had premature births, and all the children were brought dead into the world
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Ancient Greek Language
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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University Of California Press
University of California
University of California
Press, otherwise known as UC Press, is a publishing house associated with the University of California
University of California
that engages in academic publishing. It was founded in 1893[2] to publish books and papers for the faculty of the University of California, established 25 years earlier in 1868. Its headquarters are located in Oakland, California. The University of California
University of California
Press currently publishes in the following general subject areas: anthropology, art, ancient world/classical studies, California
California
and the West, cinema & media studies, criminology, environmental studies, food and wine, history, music, politics, psychology, public health and medicine, religion, and sociology. It is a non-profit publishing arm of the University of California
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Dictionary Of Greek And Roman Biography And Mythology
The Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology
Dictionary of Greek and Roman Biography and Mythology
(1849, originally published 1844 under a slightly different title) is an encyclopedia/biographical dictionary. Edited by William Smith, the dictionary spans three volumes and 3,700 pages. It is a classic work of 19th-century lexicography. The work is a companion to Smith's Dictionary of Greek and Roman Antiquities and Dictionary of Greek and Roman Geography.[1]Contents1 Authors and scope 2 Use and availability today 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksAuthors and scope[edit]Excerpt from Philolaus
Philolaus
Pythagoras book, (Charles Peter Mason, 1870)The work lists thirty-five authors in addition to the editor, who is also an author for some definitions and articles
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William Smith (lexicographer)
Sir William Smith (20 May 1813 – 7 October 1893)[1] was an English lexicographer. He also made advances in the teaching of Greek and Latin in schools.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Publications3 Honours and death 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Smith was born in Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist
Nonconformist
parents. He attended the Madras House school of John Allen in Hackney.[2] Originally destined for a theological career, he instead was articled to a solicitor. In his spare time he taught himself classics, and when he entered University College London
University College London
he carried off both the Greek and Latin prizes
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Leonhard Schmitz
Dr Leonhard Schmitz
Leonhard Schmitz
FRSE
FRSE
LLD (1807 – May 1890)[1] was a Prussian-born classical scholar and educational author, mainly active in the United Kingdom. He is sometimes referred to in the Anglicised version of his name Leonard Schmitz.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 Publications 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Schmitz was born in Eupen
Eupen
in what was then Prussia
Prussia
(now in Belgium) close to the Belgium/Germany border. He attended gymnasium in Aix-la-Chappelle to the east (now called Aachen
Aachen
and within modern day Germany). He lost his right arm in an accident at the age of 10, but nonetheless excelled academically
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Public Domain
The legal term public domain refers to works whose exclusive intellectual property rights have expired,[1] have been forfeited,[2] have been expressly waived, or are inapplicable.[3] For example, the works of Shakespeare
Shakespeare
and Beethoven, and most early silent films are in the public domain either by virtue of their having been created before copyright existed, or by their copyright term having expired.[1] Some works are not covered by copyright, and are therefore in the public domain—among them the formulae of Newtonian physics, cooking recipes,[4] and all computer software created prior to 1974.[5] Other works are actively dedicated
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Wiley-Blackwell
Wiley-Blackwell is the international scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly publishing business of John Wiley & Sons. It was formed by the merger of John Wiley's Global Scientific, Technical, and Medical business with Blackwell Publishing, after Wiley took over the latter in 2007.[1] As a learned society publisher, Wiley-Blackwell partners with around 750 societies and associations. The company publishes nearly 1,500 peer-reviewed journals and more than 1,500 new books annually in print and online, as well as databases, major reference works, and laboratory protocols
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Routledge
Routledge
Routledge
(/ˈraʊtlɪdʒ/)[2] is a British multinational publisher. It was founded in 1836 by George Routledge, and specialises in providing academic books, journals, & online resources in the fields of humanities, behavioural science, education, law and social science
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Sarah Iles Johnston
Sarah Iles Johnston (born 25 October 1957) is an American academic working at Ohio State University. She is primarily known for her contribution to Classics, and in particular her research into Ancient Greek divination and ritual texts, and their role within Ancient Greek religion.[1]Contents1 Education 2 Career 3 Publications3.1 Books 3.2 Edited volumes4 References 5 External LinksEducation[edit] Johnston attended the University of Kansas
University of Kansas
where she received her B.S. in Journalism
Journalism
in 1979, followed shortly by her B.A. in Classics
Classics
in 1980. She then attended Cornell University, where she also worked as a teaching assistant, to complete her M.A
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Greek Mythology
Greek mythology
Greek mythology
is the body of myths and teachings that belong to the ancient Greeks, concerning their gods and heroes, the nature of the world, and the origins and significance of their own cult and ritual practices. It was a part of the religion in ancient Greece. Modern scholars refer to and study the myths in an attempt to shed light on the religious and political institutions of ancient Greece and its civilization, and to gain understanding of the nature of myth-making itself.[1] Greek mythology
Greek mythology
has had an extensive influence on the culture, arts, and literature of Western civilization and remains part of Western heritage and language
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Helen King (classicist)
Helen King is a British classical scholar, who is Professor Emerita of Classical Studies at the Open University.[1] She was previously Professor of the History of Classical Medicine and head of the Department of Classics at the University of Reading.[2]Contents1 Career 2 Research interests 3 References 4 External linksCareer[edit] King took her first degree in Ancient History and Social Anthropology, at University College London; followed by a PhD at the same institution on menstruation in ancient Greece.[3] She then held research fellowships in Cambridge and Newcastle, taught at the Liverpool Institute of Higher Education for 8 years, and moved to Reading on a Wellcome Trust University Award in 1996. She moved to the Open University to be Professor of Classical Studies in 2011. She retired in January 2017 and took up the position of Robert E. and Susan T
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Apollo
Apollo
Apollo
(Attic, Ionic, and Homeric
Homeric
Greek: Ἀπόλλων, Apollōn (GEN Ἀπόλλωνος); Doric: Ἀπέλλων, Apellōn; Arcadocypriot: Ἀπείλων, Apeilōn; Aeolic: Ἄπλουν, Aploun; Latin: Apollō) is one of the most important and complex of the Olympian deities in classical Greek and Roman religion and Greek and Roman mythology. The ideal of the kouros (a beardless, athletic youth), Apollo
Apollo
has been variously recognized as a god of music, truth and prophecy, healing, the sun and light, plague, poetry, and more. Apollo
Apollo
is the son of Zeus
Zeus
and Leto, and has a twin sister, the chaste huntress Artemis
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Manes
In ancient Roman religion, the Manes
Manes
/ˈmeɪniːz/ or Di Manes
Manes
are chthonic deities sometimes thought to represent souls of deceased loved ones. They were associated with the Lares, Lemures, Genii, and Di Penates
Di Penates
as deities (di) that pertained to domestic, local, and personal cult. They belonged broadly to the category of di inferi, "those who dwell below,"[1] the undifferentiated collective of divine dead.[2] The Manes
Manes
were honored during the Parentalia and Feralia in February. The theologian St
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