HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Aomori Prefecture
Aomori Prefecture (青森県, Aomori-ken) is a prefecture of Japan located in the Tōhoku region.[2] The capital is the city of Aomori.[3]Contents1 History 2 Climate 3 Geography3.1 Cities 3.2 Towns and villages 3.3 Military bases 3.4 Mergers4 Economy 5 Culture5.1 Festivals6 Transportation6.1 Airports 6.2 Railway6.2.1 Stations 6.2.2 Lines6.3 Road6.3.1 Expressways 6.3.2 National highways7 Tourism7.1 Big Buddha 7.2 Hirosaki Castle 7.3 Mutsu Bay 7.4 Jesus Christ's grave legend 7.5 Juniko Lakes 7.6 Lake Towada 7.7 Mount Osore 7.8 Hakkoda Mountains 7.9 Other places of interest8 Education8.1 Universities9 Sport 10 Prefectural symbols 11 Dialects 12 Media12.1 TV13 Notable people from Aomori Prefecture 14 Notes 15 References 16 External links
[...More...]

"Aomori Prefecture" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Auction
An auction is a process of buying and selling goods or services by offering them up for bid, taking bids, and then selling the item to the highest bidder
[...More...]

"Auction" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hungary
Coordinates: 47°N 20°E / 47°N 20°E / 47; 20Hungary Magyarország  (Hungarian)FlagCoat of armsAnthem: "Himnusz" (Hungarian)[1] "Hymn"Location of  Hungary  (dark green) – in Europe  (green & dark grey) – in the European Union  (green)  –  [Legend]Capital and largest city Budapest 47°26′N 19°15′E / 47.433°N 19.250°E / 47.433; 19.250Official language and national language Hungarian[2]Ethnic groups (2011)80.7% Hungarians 14.7% not declared 3.1% Roma 1.3% Germans[3]Religion52.9% Christianity –38.9% Catholicism –13.7% Protestantism –0.1% Orthodox Church 0.1% Judaism 1.7% other 18.2% not religious 27.2% unanswered[4]Demonym HungarianGovernment Unitary parliamentary constitutional republic• PresidentJános Áder• Prime MinisterViktor O
[...More...]

"Hungary" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pyongtaek
Pyeongtaek (Korean pronunciation: [pʰjʌŋ.tʰɛ̝k̚]) is a city in Gyeonggi Province, South Korea. Located in the southwestern part of the province, Pyeongtaek was founded as a union of two districts in 940, during the Goryeo dynasty. It was elevated to city status in 1986 and is home to a South Korean naval base and a large concentration of United States troops. The South Korean government plans to transform Pyeongtaek city to an international economic hub to coincide with the move of the United States Forces Korea (USFK) to Pyeongtaek. During the Korean War it was the site of an early battle between U.S. and North Korean forces, the Battle of Pyongtaek. It is the location of Pyeongtaek University.Contents1 Military base1.1 South African War Memorial2 Education 3 Notes 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksMilitary base[edit] The United States and South Korean governments came to an agreement[when?] to enlarge Camp Humphreys — a U.S
[...More...]

"Pyongtaek" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Hakodate
Hakodate (函館市, Hakodate-shi) is a city and port located in Oshima Subprefecture, Hokkaido, Japan. It is the capital city of Oshima Subprefecture. As of July 31, 2011, the city has an estimated population of 279,851 with 143,221 households, and a population density of 412.83 persons per km2 (1,069.2 persons per sq. mi.). The total area is 677.77 km2 (261.69 sq mi)
[...More...]

"Hakodate" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Ferry
A ferry is a merchant vessel used to carry passengers, and sometimes vehicles and cargo as well, across a body of water. Most ferries operate regular return services. A passenger ferry with many stops, such as in Venice, Italy, is sometimes called a water bus or water taxi. Ferries form a part of the public transport systems of many waterside cities and islands, allowing direct transit between points at a capital cost much lower than bridges or tunnels
[...More...]

"Ferry" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Pittosporum Resiniferum
Pittosporum
Pittosporum
resiniferum, the resin cheesewood[2] or petroleum nut, is a tree that grows in the Philippines
Philippines
and Malaysia, particularly in the wilderness surrounding the Mayon Volcano
Mayon Volcano
and in the Cordillera of the Philippines
Philippines
and Mount Kinabalu
Mount Kinabalu
of Sabah, Malaysia.[1] The petroleum nut derives its name from the resemblance of the fruit's odor to petroleum-based fuels. The fruits of the tree burn brightly when ignited, and can be used for illumination as torches or candles.[3] Its fruit is also highly suitable for use in producing biofuel
[...More...]

"Pittosporum Resiniferum" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Seoul, South Korea
Seoul
Seoul
(/soʊl/; 서울; Korean: [sʌ.ul] ( listen)), officially the Seoul
Seoul
Special
Special
Metropolitan City – is the capital[10] and largest metropolis of the Republic of Korea
Korea
(commonly known as South Korea).[1] Seoul
Seoul
forms the heart of the Seoul
Seoul
Capital Area, and includes the surrounding Incheon
Incheon
metropolis and Gyeonggi province, altogether home to roughly half of the country's population.[11][12] Strategically situated on the Han River, Seoul's history stretches back over two thousand years, when it was founded in 18 BC by the people of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea. The city was later designated the capital of Korea
Korea
under the Joseon
Joseon
dynasty
[...More...]

"Seoul, South Korea" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Khabarovsk, Russia
Khabarovsk (Russian: Хаба́ровск, IPA: [xɐˈbarəfsk]; Chinese: 伯力; pinyin: Bó Lì; Manchu: ᠪᠣᡥᠣᡵᡳ; Möllendorff: Bohori) is the largest city and the administrative center of Khabarovsk Krai, Russia,[4] located 30 kilometers (19 mi) from the Chinese border, at the confluence of the Amur and Ussuri Rivers, about 800 kilometers (500 mi) north of Vladivostok. The city also became the administrative center of the Far Eastern Federal District of Russia in 2002. It is the second largest city in the Russian Far East, after Vladivostok
[...More...]

"Khabarovsk, Russia" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Nonai
Nonai may refer to:Nonai, Aomori, a former municipality in Aomori, Aomori, Japan Nonai Station, a railway station in Aomori, Aomori, Japan Nōnai Poison Berry, an ongoing Japanese slice of life romance josei manga series written and illustrated by Setona Mizushiro.This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Nonai. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
[...More...]

"Nonai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Japanese Language
Japanese (日本語, Nihongo, [ɲihoŋɡo] or [ɲihoŋŋo] ( listen)) is an East Asian language spoken by about 126 million people, primarily in Japan, where it is the national language. It is a member of the Japonic (or Japanese-Ryukyuan) language family, and its relation to other languages, such as Korean, is debated. Japanese has been grouped with language families such as Ainu, Austroasiatic, and the now-discredited Altaic, but none of these proposals has gained widespread acceptance. Little is known of the language's prehistory, or when it first appeared in Japan. Chinese documents from the 3rd century recorded a few Japanese words, but substantial texts did not appear until the 8th century. During the Heian period
Heian period
(794–1185), Chinese had considerable influence on the vocabulary and phonology of Old Japanese
[...More...]

"Japanese Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

B-29 Superfortress
The Boeing
Boeing
B-29 Superfortress is a four-engine propeller-driven heavy bomber designed by Boeing, which was flown primarily by the United States during World War II
World War II
and the Korean War. It was one of the largest aircraft operational during World War II
World War II
and featured state-of-the-art technology. Including design and production, at over $3 billion it was the single most expensive weapons project undertaken by the United States
United States
in World War II, exceeding the cost of the Manhattan Project
Manhattan Project
by between $1 and 1.7 billion.[4][5] Innovations introduced included a pressurized cabin, dual-wheeled, tricycle landing gear, and an analog computer-controlled fire-control system that directed four remote machine gun turrets that could be operated by a single gunner and a fire-control officer
[...More...]

"B-29 Superfortress" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

2011 Tōhoku Earthquake And Tsunami
The 2011 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tōhoku (東北地方太平洋沖地震, Tōhoku-chihō Taiheiyō Oki Jishin) was a magnitude 9.0–9.1 (Mw) undersea megathrust earthquake off the coast of Japan
Japan
that occurred at 14:46 JST (05:46 UTC) on Friday 11 March 2011,[4][9][10] with the epicentre approximately 70 kilometres (43 mi) east of the Oshika Peninsula
Oshika Peninsula
of Tōhoku and the hypocenter at an underwater depth of approximately 29 km (18 mi).[4][11] The earthquake is often referred to in Japan
Japan
as the Great East Japan
Japan
Earthquake (東日本大震災, Higashi nihon daishinsai)[12][13][fn 1] and is also known as the 2011 Tōhoku earthquake,[28] and the 3.11 earthquake
[...More...]

"2011 Tōhoku Earthquake And Tsunami" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Meiji Restoration
The Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
(明治維新, Meiji Ishin), also known as the Meiji Ishin, Renovation, Revolution, Reform, or Renewal, was an event that restored practical imperial rule to the Empire of Japan
Empire of Japan
in 1868 under Emperor Meiji. Although there were ruling Emperors before the Meiji Restoration, the events restored practical abilities and consolidated the political system under the Emperor of Japan.[2] The goals of the restored government were expressed by the new Emperor in the Charter Oath
[...More...]

"Meiji Restoration" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tsunami
A tsunami (from Japanese: 津波, "harbour wave";[1] English pronunciation: /tsuːˈnɑːmi/ tsoo-NAH-mee[2]) or tidal wave, also known as a seismic sea wave, is a series of waves in a water body caused by the displacement of a large volume of water, generally in an ocean or a large lake.[3] Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other underwater explosions (including detonations of underwater nuclear devices), landslides, glacier calvings, meteorite impacts and other disturbances above or below water all have the potential to generate a tsunami.[4] Unlike normal ocean waves, which are generated by wind, or tides, which are generated by the gravitational pull of the Moon and the Sun, a tsunami is generated by the displacement of water. Tsunami
Tsunami
waves do not resemble normal undersea currents or sea waves because their wavelength is far longer.[5] Rather than appearing as a breaking wave, a tsunami may instead initially resemble a rapidly rising tide
[...More...]

"Tsunami" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Bewick's Swan
C. c. bewickii (Yarrell, 1830), Bewick's swan C. c. columbianus (Ord, 1815), whistling swanSynonymsAnas columbianus Ord, 1815 Cygnus bewickii (Yarrell, 1838) Cygnus bewickii jankowski (lapsus) Cygnus bewickii jankowskii Cygnus columbianus jancowskii (lapsus) Cygnus columbianus jankowskii Olor bewickii (Yarrell, 1838) Olor columbianus (Ord, 1815)The tundra swan (Cygnus columbianus) is a small Holarctic swan. The two taxa within it are usually regarded as conspecific, but are also sometimes[2][3] split into two species: Bewick's swan (Cygnus bewickii) of the Palaearctic and the whistling swan (C. columbianus) proper of the Nearctic. Birds from eastern Russia (roughly east of the Taimyr Peninsula) are sometimes separated as the subspecies C. c. jankowskii, but this is not widely accepted as distinct, with most authors including them in C. c. bewickii
[...More...]

"Bewick's Swan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.