HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Aoi Tokugawa Sandai
Aoi Tokugawa Sandai (葵 徳川三代, Aoi: Tokugawa Three Generations) is a 2000 Japanese television series that premiered on January 9, 2000, and ended on December 17, 2000
[...More...]

"Aoi Tokugawa Sandai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Honda Masazumi
Honda Masazumi (本多 正純) (1566 – April 5, 1637) was a Japanese samurai of the Azuchi–Momoyama period through early Edo period, who served the Tokugawa clan. He later became a daimyō, and one of the first rōjū of the Tokugawa shogunate. Masazumi was born in 1565; he was the eldest son of Honda Masanobu. Father and son served Tokugawa Ieyasu together. Masazumi was in the main force at Sekigahara; after the battle, Masazumi was entrusted with the guardianship of the defeated Ishida Mitsunari. Masazumi was made a daimyo in 1608, with an income of 33,000 koku. Ieyasu trusted Honda sufficiently to have relied on him as an intermediary for diplomatic initiatives with China.[1] Later, Masazumi served at the Siege of Osaka; in 1616, he became a toshiyori; this was the position that would soon after be renamed as rōjū. In this role, he worked closely with the now-retired second shogun, Hidetada. During this period, his income was increased to 53,000 koku, then to 155,000 in 1619
[...More...]

"Honda Masazumi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Tokugawa Masako
Tokugawa Masako (徳川 和子, November 23, 1607 – August 2, 1678), also known as Kazu-ko,[1] was an empress consort of Japan. She was the daughter of Tokugawa Hidetada, who was the second shōgun of the Edo period of the history of Japan.Contents1 History 2 Achievements 3 Family 4 Interests 5 Notes 6 ReferencesHistory[edit]1620 (Genna 6): Masako entered the palace as a consort of the Emperor Go-Mizunoo. Although Go-Mizunoo has already taken a wife, the marriage to Masako was celebrated with great pomp.[2] 1624: Masako is granted the title of chūgū (中宮), indicating she was a second legitimate wife and therefore an established Empress Consort. She is the first consort to hold this title since the reign of Emperor Go-Hanazono.[3] 1629: When the Emperor Go-Mizunoo abdicated in 1629, Masako took the title and name of Tōfuku mon-in (東福門院).[4]Masako's daughter, Imperial Princess Onna-Ichi-no-miya Okiko, succeeded her father
[...More...]

"Tokugawa Masako" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
Toyotomi Hideyoshi
(豊臣 秀吉, March 17, 1537 – September 18, 1598) was a preeminent daimyō, warrior, general, samurai, and politician of the Sengoku period[1] who is regarded as Japan's second "great unifier".[2] He succeeded his former liege lord, Oda Nobunaga, and brought an end to the Warring Lords period. The period of his rule is often called the Momoyama period, named after Hideyoshi's castle. After his death, his young son Hideyori was displaced by Tokugawa Ieyasu. Hideyoshi is noted for a number of cultural legacies, including the restriction that only members of the samurai class could bear arms. He financed the construction, restoration and rebuilding of many temples standing today in Kyoto. Outside of Japan, he is best known for ordering the Japanese invasions of Korea (1592–98)
[...More...]

"Toyotomi Hideyoshi" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tokugawa Ieyasu
Illegitimate:Yūki Hideyasu Toku-hime Tokugawa Hidetada Matsudaira Tadayoshi Takeda Nobuyoshi Matsudaira Tadateru Matsudaira Matsuchiyo Matsudaira Senchiyo Tokugawa Yoshinao Tokugawa Yorinobu Tokugawa Yorifusa Furihime Matsuhime IchihimeAmong others...ParentsMatsudaira Hirotada Odai-no-kataThe Tokugawa clan
Tokugawa clan
crest Tokugawa Ieyasu
Tokugawa Ieyasu
(徳川 家康, January 31, 1543 – June 1, 1616) was the founder and first shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate
Tokugawa shogunate
of Japan, which effectively ruled Japan
Japan
from the Battle of Sekigahara
Battle of Sekigahara
in 1600 until the Meiji Restoration
Meiji Restoration
in 1868. Ieyasu seized power in 1600, received appointment as shōgun in 1603, and abdicated from office in 1605, but remained in power until his death in 1616
[...More...]

"Tokugawa Ieyasu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tokugawa Hidetada
Among Others...ParentsTokugawa Ieyasu Saigō-no-Tsubone Tokugawa Hidetada
Tokugawa Hidetada
(徳川 秀忠, May 2, 1579 – March 14, 1632) was the second shōgun of the Tokugawa dynasty, who ruled from 1605 until his abdication in 1623. He was the third son of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the first shōgun of the Tokugawa shogunate.Contents1 Early life (1579–1593) 2 Military achievements (1593–1605) 3 Shōgun
Shōgun
(1605–1623) 4 Ogosho (1623–1632) 5 Honours 6 Eras 7 Family 8 Notable descendants 9 Notes 10 ReferencesEarly life (1579–1593)[edit] Tokugawa Hidetada
Tokugawa Hidetada
was born to Tokugawa Ieyasu
Tokugawa Ieyasu
and the Lady Saigō
Lady Saigō
(the first of his many consorts) on May 2, 1579
[...More...]

"Tokugawa Hidetada" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tokugawa Iemitsu
Tokugawa Iemitsu
Tokugawa Iemitsu
(徳川 家光 August 12, 1604 – June 8, 1651) was the third shōgun of the Tokugawa dynasty. He was the eldest son of Tokugawa Hidetada, and the grandson of Tokugawa Ieyasu. Iemitsu ruled from 1623 to 1651, and during this period he crucified Christians, expelled all Europeans from Japan
Japan
and closed the borders of the country, a foreign politics policy that continued for over 200 years after its institution. It is debatable whether Iemitsu can be considered a kinslayer for making his younger brother Tadanaga commit suicide by seppuku
[...More...]

"Tokugawa Iemitsu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Oeyo
Oeyo
Oeyo
(於江与), (江), Ogō (小督) or Satoko (達子) : 1573 – September 15, 1626) was a prominently-placed female figure in late-Sengoku period. She married three times, first to Saji Kazunari, her cousin, then to Toyotomi Hideyoshi's nephew, Toyotomi Hidekatsu. She had a daughter with Hidekatsu named Toyotomi Sadako later married Kujō Yukiie. Her third and last husband Tokugawa Hidetada
Tokugawa Hidetada
became the second Tokugawa shōgun. She was also the mother of his successor Iemitsu, the third shōgun. She had Senhime, Tamahime, Katsuhime, Hatsuhime, Takechiyo (Iemitsu), and Tadanaga. Hatsuhime was adopted by Oeyo's sister Ohatsu, who is the wife of Kyōgoku Takatsugu. Hidetada's changing fortunes affected Oeyo's life as well
[...More...]

"Oeyo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Michiko Godai
Michiko Godai (五大 路子, Godai Michiko), real name Michiko Ōwada (大和田 美智子, Ōwada Michiko) (born on September 22, 1952 in Yokohama, Kanagawa) is a Japanese actress. Roles[edit]Sachiko Yagami in Death NoteReferences[edit] Michiko Godai on IMDbAuthority controlWorldCat Identities VIAF: 83553473This article about a Japanese actor or actress is a stub
[...More...]

"Michiko Godai" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lady Chaa
Lady Chaa (茶阿局, Chaa no Tsubone) (d. July 30, 1621) was a concubine of Tokugawa Ieyasu, the founder of the Tokugawa shogunate in Japan. She lived in Tōtōmi Province.[1][2] Her Buddhist name was Unkoin. When the daikan (a local official) had her husband killed, she appealed to Ieyasu, who was then the lord of Hamamatsu Castle; as a result, he punished the daikan.[3] She subsequently became a concubine of Ieyasu, and in 1592 bore him a son Matsudaira Tadateru. Chaa died in 1621. Her grave is at Sōkei-ji, a Buddhist temple in Bunkyō, Tokyo. Her buddhist name is Satoru'in Family[edit]Husband: Tokugawa Ieyasu Sons:Matsudaira Tadateru Matsudaira MatsuchiyoNotes[edit]^ Bolitho, Harold. (1974). Treasures Among Men: The Fudai Daimyo in Tokugawa Japan. New Haven: Yale University Press. ISBN 978-0-300-01655-0; OCLC 185685588 ^ McClain, James. (1991)
[...More...]

"Lady Chaa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Lady Kasuga
Lady Kasuga (春日局, Kasuga no Tsubone, 1579 – October 26, 1643) was from a prominent Japanese samurai family of the Azuchi–Momoyama and Edo periods. Born Saitō Fuku (斉藤福), she was a daughter of Saitō Toshimitsu (who was a retainer of Akechi Mitsuhide). Her mother's father was Inaba Yoshimichi. Married to Inaba Masanari, she had three sons, including Inaba Masakatsu, and an adopted son, Hotta Masatoshi. She was the wet nurse of the third Tokugawa shogun Iemitsu. She also established the Ōoku, the women's quarters, at Edo Castle and also she became Roju otoshiyori after Iemitsu became shogun. There is some rumour said that Tokugawa Iemitsu was son of Tokugawa Ieyasu with Kasuga. In 1629, Ofuku traveled to the capital, where she had an audience with the emperor at the Imperial Court in Kyoto
[...More...]

"Lady Kasuga" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Okaji No Kata
Okaji no Kata (お梶の方) (December 7, 1578 – September 17, 1642) or Lady Okaji, was a concubine of Tokugawa Ieyasu. She came from a relatively unknown origin. She was either Ōta Dōkan's adopted daughter, Tōyama Naokage's daughter, or Edo Shigemichi's daughter. Her other names are Oha (お八の方) and Okatsu (お勝の方). Many people believe that Ieyasu met Okaji around the time he first settled in Edo. Due to her status as his concubine, her age when they met is not recorded but some historians postulate that she could have been in her early teens. The two met due to her older brother reaching a higher status. Ieyasu was pleased with her charming wit and fell in love with her quickly. She was going to marry Matsudaira Masatsuna but the arrangement was cancelled after she became pregnant. She bore Ieyasu's last child and daughter, Ichihime, who died on 1610 after took some wild berries that poisoned
[...More...]

"Okaji No Kata" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Japan
Coordinates: 35°N 136°E / 35°N 136°E / 35; 136Japan 日本国 Nippon-koku or Nihon-kokuFlagImperial SealAnthem: "Kimigayo" 君が代"His Imperial Majesty's Reign"[2][3] Government
Government
Seal of JapanGo-Shichi no Kiri (五七桐)Area controlled by Japan
[...More...]

"Japan" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Senhime
Senhime
Senhime
or Lady Sen (千姫) (May 26,[1] 1597 – March 11,[2] 1666) was the eldest daughter of the shōgun Tokugawa Hidetada
Tokugawa Hidetada
and his wife Oeyo. She was born during the Warring-States period of Japanese history
[...More...]

"Senhime" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Yūki Hideyasu
Yūki Hideyasu
Yūki Hideyasu
(結城 秀康, 1 March 1574 – 2 June 1607) was a Japanese daimyō who lived during the Azuchi–Momoyama and early Edo periods. He was the head of the Fukui Domain
Fukui Domain
in Echizen.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Mature years 3 Later years 4 Family 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Hideyasu was born Tokugawa Ogimaru (於義丸) in 1574, the second son of Tokugawa Ieyasu, by his concubine, Lady Oman (also known as Lady Kogō). Oman is said to have given birth to twins, and that Ogimaru's brother succeeded Oman's father as priest of Chiryū Shrine in Mikawa Province. He was born near Hamamatsu Castle, in Ofumi Village.[citation needed] Oman was a servant to Lady Tsukiyama, Ieyasu's wife
[...More...]

"Yūki Hideyasu" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Matsudaira Tadateru
Matsudaira Tadateru
Matsudaira Tadateru
(松平 忠輝, February 16, 1592 – August 24, 1683) was a daimyō during the Edo period
Edo period
of Japan. He was the sixth son of Tokugawa Ieyasu. He was born in Edo Castle
Edo Castle
during the year of the dragon (tatsu), and as a child his name was Tatsuchiyo (辰千代). His mother was Lady Chaa (茶阿局, Chaa no Tsubone), a concubine of Ieyasu. Ieyasu sent the boy to live with a vassal, Minagawa Hiroteru, daimyō of the Minagawa Domain in Shimotsuke Province.Matsudaira Tadateru's grave, at Teishoin in Suwa, NaganoIn 1599, Ieyasu granted him a fief in Musashi Province, and increased his holdings in 1602 and 1603 with transfers first to Shimōsa and then to Shinano Provinces. Tadateru married Irohahime, the first daughter of Date Masamune, in 1606. In 1610, Tadateru became daimyo of Takada in Echigo Province
[...More...]

"Matsudaira Tadateru" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.