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Anton Walter
Gabriel Anton Walter
Anton Walter
(5 February 1752 – 11 April 1826) was a builder of pianos. The Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians
Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians
describes him as "the most famous Viennese piano maker of his time".[1]Contents1 Life 2 Walter's pianos2.1 Mozart's instrument 2.2 Surviving Walter pianos3 Walter's pianos as models for modern builders 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] Walter was born in Neuhausen auf den Fildern, Germany.[1] The record of his marriage to a widow named Anna Elisabeth Schöffstoss in 1780 indicates that he had moved to Vienna by that time.[2] His earlier surviving pianos are dated to this year.[1] His piano business was evidently successful
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Friedrich Gauermann
Friedrich Gauermann
Friedrich Gauermann
(10 September 1807, Scheuchenstein (de) – 7 July 1862) was an Austrian painter. The son of the landscape painter Jacob Gauermann
Jacob Gauermann
(1773–1843), he was born at Miesenbach near Gutenstein in Lower Austria. He was an early representative of the Veristic style devoted to nature in all its diversity.[1] It was the intention of his father that Gauermann should devote himself to agriculture, but the example of an elder brother, who, however, died early, fostered his inclination towards art. Under his father's direction he began studies in landscape, and he also diligently copied the works of the chief masters in animal painting which were contained in the academy and court library of Vienna
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Walnut
A walnut is the nut of any tree of the genus Juglans
Juglans
(Family Juglandaceae), particularly the Persian or English walnut, Juglans regia. Technically a walnut is the seed of a drupe or drupaceous nut, and thus not a true botanical nut. It is used for food after being processed while green for pickled walnuts or after full ripening for its nutmeat. Nutmeat of the eastern black walnut from the Juglans nigra is less commercially available, as are butternut nutmeats from Juglans
Juglans
cinerea
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SNAC
SNAC, or Social Networks and Archival Context, is an online effort for discovering, locating, and using distributed historical records started by a collaboration of United States-based organizations. It was established in 2010, with funding from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) by the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA),[1] California Digital Library (CDL), Institute for Advanced Technology in the Humanities (IATH) at the University of Virginia and the University of California, Berkeley School of Information.[2][3] See also[edit] Archival Resource Key (ARK)References[edit]^ Ferriero, David (2015-08-18). "Introducing SNAC". National Archives - AOTUS blog. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ "SNAC: Social Networks and Archival Context". socialarchive.iath.virginia.edu. Retrieved 2017-05-08.  ^ Larson, Ray R.; Pitti, Daniel; Turner, Adrian (2014)
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Biblioteca Nacional De España
The Biblioteca Nacional de España
Biblioteca Nacional de España
(National Library of Spain) is a major public library, the largest in Spain, and one of the largest in the world. It is located in Madrid, on the Paseo de Recoletos.Contents1 History 2 The library today 3 See also 4 References 5 External links 6 ImagesHistory[edit] The library was founded by King Philip V in 1712 as the Palace Public Library (Biblioteca Pública de Palacio). The Royal Letters Patent that he granted, the predecessor of the current legal deposit requirement, made it mandatory for printers to submit a copy of every book printed in Spain
Spain
to the library. In 1836, the library's status as Crown property was revoked and ownership was transferred to the Ministry of Governance (Ministerio de la Gobernación)
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garb
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Eva Badura-Skoda
Eva Badura-Skoda (née Halfar) is a German/Austrian musicologist.[1] Eva Halfar studied at the Vienna Conservatory and took courses in musicology, philosophy, and art history at the universities of Heidelberg, Vienna (Erich Schenk), and Innsbruck (Ph.D., 1953, with the thesis Studien zur Geschichte des Musikunterrichtes in Österreich im 16., 17. und 18. Jahrhundert). In 1951 she married Paul Badura-Skoda, with whom she collaborated on the volumes Mozart-Interpretation (Vienna, 1957; English transl., 1961; 2nd edition, rev., 1996) and Bach-Interpretation (Laaber, 1990; English transl., 1992). In 1962 and 1963 she led summer seminars at the Salzburg Mozarteum. In 1964 she was the Brittingham visiting professor at the University of Wisconsin, where she served as professor of musicology from 1966 to 1974
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Historically Informed Performance
Historically informed performance
Historically informed performance
(also referred to as period performance, authentic performance, or HIP) is an approach to the performance of classical music, which aims to be faithful to the approach, manner and style of the musical era in which a work was originally conceived. It is based on two key aspects: the application of the stylistic and technical aspects of performance, known as performance practice; and the use of period instruments which may be reproductions of historical instruments that were in use at the time of the original composition and which usually have different timbre and temperament.[1] Because no sound recordings exist of music before the modern era, historically informed performance is necessarily derived from academic musicological research. Historical treatises, as well as additional historical evidence, are used to gain insight into the performance practice of a historic era
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Franz Schubert
Franz Peter Schubert (German: [ˈfʁant͡s ˈʃuːbɐt]; 31 January 1797 – 19 November 1828) was an Austrian composer. Schubert was extremely prolific during his short lifetime. His output consists of over 600 secular vocal works (mainly Lieder), seven complete symphonies, sacred music, operas, incidental music and a large body of chamber and piano music, all before he died at age 31. Appreciation of Schubert's music while he was alive was limited to a relatively small circle of admirers in Vienna, but interest in his work increased significantly in the decades following his death. Felix Mendelssohn, Robert Schumann, Franz Liszt, Johannes Brahms
Johannes Brahms
and other 19th-century composers discovered and championed his works
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Wilhelm August Rieder
Wilhelm August Rieder
Wilhelm August Rieder
(30 October 1796 – 8 September 1880), was an Austrian painter and draughtsman. Rieder was born in Oberdöbling, the son of the composer Ambros Rieder (1771–1855). He studied at the Academy of Fine Arts Vienna, where he first met and befriended Franz Schubert. He subsequently painted a number of Schubert's portraits. He also painted a number of religious and historical themed works. References[edit]Constantin von Wurzbach : Rieder, Wilhelm August . In : Biographical Dictionary of the Empire of Austria. Volume 26, published by LC Zamarski, Vienna 1874, pp. 107-110 . Art Auction by CJ Wawra : catalog of the artistic legacy of the history painter Wilhelm August Rieder, Vienna: CJ Wawra, 1881. Wilhelm August Rieder. In : Ulrich Thieme, Felix Becker, among others : general lexicon of visual artists from antiquity to the present. Volume XXVIII, E. A. Seemann, Leipzig 1934, p 322 Prof
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Bach House (Eisenach)
The Bach House in Eisenach, Thuringia, Germany, is a museum dedicated to the composer Johann Sebastian Bach
Johann Sebastian Bach
who was born in the city. On its 600 m² it displays around 250 original exhibits, among them a Bach music autograph. The core of the building complex is a half-timbered house, ca. 550 years old, which was mistakenly identified as Bach's birth house in the middle of the 19th century. In 1905, the Leipzig-based Neue Bachgesellschaft
Neue Bachgesellschaft
acquired the building
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Caryatid
A caryatid (/kæriˈætɪd/ kair-ee-AT-id; Greek: Καρυάτις, plural: Καρυάτιδες) is a sculpted female figure serving as an architectural support taking the place of a column or a pillar supporting an entablature on her head
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Gilding
The term gilding covers a number of decorative techniques for applying fine gold leaf or powder to solid surfaces such as wood, stone, or metal to give a thin coating of gold. A gilded object is also described as "gilt". Where metal is gilded, it was traditionally silver in the West, to make silver-gilt (or vermeil) objects, but gilt-bronze is commonly used in China, and also called ormolu if it is Western. Methods of gilding include hand application and glueing, chemical gilding, and electroplating, the last also called gold plating.[1] Parcel-gilt (partial gilt) objects are only gilded over part of their surfaces
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Stuttgart
Stuttgart
Stuttgart
(/ˈʃtʊtɡɑːrt/ SHTUUT-gart;[4] German: [ˈʃtʊtɡaʁt] ( listen); Swabian: Schduagert, pronounced [ˈʒ̊d̥ua̯ɡ̊ɛʕd̥]; names in other languages) is the capital and largest city of the German state of Baden-Württemberg. Stuttgart is located on the Neckar
Neckar
river in a fertile valley known locally as the " Stuttgart
Stuttgart
Cauldron." It lies an hour from the Swabian Jura
Swabian Jura
and the Black Forest. Its urban area has a population of 609,219,[5] making it the sixth largest city in Germany.[6] 2.7 million people live in the city's administrative region[7] and another 5.3 million people in its metropolitan area,[8] making it the fourth largest metropolitan area in Germany
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Square Piano
The square piano is a type of piano that has horizontal strings arranged diagonally across the rectangular case above the hammers and with the keyboard set in the long side, with the sounding board above a cavity in the short side. It is variously attributed to Silbermann and Frederici and was improved by Petzold and Babcock. The English and Viennese square pianos were built in many different designs, including within the action as well as general appearance, from roughly 1760. Because of the competitive industry and relative youth of the instrument design itself, experimentation ensued in the early years, creating a range of moderators (sound-altering effects) and other technical devices (knee levers; hand stops) not seen today.[1] In London, the explosion of the trade is generally attributed to the maker Zumpe
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