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Antiochus II Theos
Antiochus II Theos
Antiochus II Theos
(Greek: Ἀντίοχος Β΄ ὁ Θεός; 286–246 BC) was a Greek king of the Hellenistic Seleucid Empire
Seleucid Empire
who reigned from 261 to 246 BC. He succeeded his father Antiochus I
Antiochus I
Soter in the winter of 262–61 BC. He was the younger son of Antiochus I and princess Stratonice, the daughter of Demetrius Poliorcetes.[1] He inherited a state of war with Ptolemaic Egypt, the "Second Syrian War", which was fought along the coasts of Asia Minor, and the constant intrigues of petty despots and restless city-states in Asia Minor. Antiochus also made some attempt to get a footing in Thrace.[2] During the war he was given the title Theos (Greek: Θεός, "God"), being such to the Milesians in slaying the tyrant Timarchus.[3] During the time Antiochus was occupied with the war against Egypt, Andragoras, his satrap in Parthia, proclaimed independence
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Basileus
Basileus
Basileus
(Greek: βασιλεύς)[n 1] is a Greek term and title that has signified various types of monarchs in history. In the English-speaking world it is perhaps most widely understood to mean "king" or "emperor". The title was used by the Byzantine emperors, and has a longer history of use by sovereigns and other persons of authority in ancient Greece, as well as for the kings of modern Greece. The feminine forms are basileia (βασίλεια), basilis (βασιλίς), basilissa (βασίλισσα), or the archaic basilinna (βασιλίννα), meaning "queen" or "empress".[1]Contents1 Etymology 2 Ancient Greece2.1 Original senses encountered on clay tablets2.1.1 Basileus
Basileus
vs
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Thrace
Thrace
Thrace
(/θreɪs/; Modern Greek: Θράκη, Thráke; Bulgarian: Тракия, Trakiya; Turkish: Trakya) is a geographical and historical area in southeast Europe, now split between Bulgaria, Greece
Greece
and Turkey, which is bounded by the Balkan Mountains
Balkan Mountains
to the north, the Aegean Sea
Aegean Sea
to the south and the Black Sea
Black Sea
to the east
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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Chola
List of Chola
Chola
kings and emperorsEarly CholasEllalan Kulakkottan Ilamchetchenni Karikala Nedunkilli Nalankilli Killivalavan Kopperuncholan Kochchenganan PerunarkilliInterregnum (c. 200 – c. 848)Medieval CholasVijayalaya 848–891(?)Aditya I 891–907Parantaka I 907–950Gandaraditya 950–957Arinjaya 956–957Sundara (Parantaka II) 957–970Aditya II (co-regent)Uttama 970–985Rajaraja I 985–1014Rajendra I 1012–1044Rajadhiraja 1044–1054Rajendra II 1054–1063Virar
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Herbal Medicine
Herbalism
Herbalism
(also herbal medicine or phytotherapy) is the study of botany and use of plants intended for medicinal purposes or for supplementing a diet. Plants have been the basis for medical treatments through much of human history, and such traditional medicine is still widely practiced today.[1] Modern medicine makes use of many plant-derived compounds as the basis for evidence-based pharmaceutical drugs. Although phytotherapy may apply modern standards of effectiveness testing to herbs and medicines derived from natural sources, few high-quality clinical trials and standards for purity or dosage exist
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Antigonus Gonatas
Antigonus (Ancient Greek: Ἀντίγονος), a Greek name meaning "comparable to his father" or "worthy of his father", may refer to:Three Macedonian kings of the Antigonid dynasty
Antigonid dynasty
that succeeded Alexander the Great in Asia:
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Yojana
A Yojana (Sanskrit: योजन) is a Vedic measure of distance that was used in ancient India. A Yojana is about 12–15 km. (i.e. 4 Kosh = 1 Yojana and 1 kosh is 2 - 3.5 km)Contents1 Yojana as per "Vishnu Purana"1.1 Clearly defined2 Variations on length 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading Yojana as per "Vishnu Purana"[edit] Yojana is defined in Chapter 6 of Book 1 of the ancient vedic text “Vishnu Purana” as follows:[1] Clearly defined[edit]Measurement Equals to..
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Proselytism
Proselytism
Proselytism
/ˈprɒsəlɪˌtɪzəm/ is the act of attempting to convert people to another religion or opinion.[1][2] The word proselytize is derived from the Greek language
Greek language
prefix προσ- (pros-, toward) and the verb ἔρχομαι (érchomai, to come) in the form of προσήλυτος (prosélytos, a new comer).[3] Historically in the Koine Greek
Koine Greek
Septuagint
Septuagint
and New Testament, the word proselyte denoted a gentile who was considering conversion to Judaism. Though the word proselytism originally referred to Early Christianity (and earlier Gentiles such as God-fearers), it now refers to the attempt of any religion or religious individuals to convert people to their beliefs, or any attempt to convert people to a different point of view, religious or not
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Buddhism
Buddhism
Buddhism
(/ˈbʊdɪzəm, ˈbuː-/)[1][2] is a religion[3][4] and dharma that encompasses a variety of traditions, beliefs and spiritual practices largely based on original teachings attributed to the Buddha and resulting interpreted philosophies. Buddhism
Buddhism
originated in Ancient India
India
sometime between the 6th and 4th centuries BCE, from where it spread through much of Asia, whereafter it declined in India
India
during the Middle Ages. Two major extant branches of Buddhism
Buddhism
are generally recognized by scholars: Theravada
Theravada
(Pali: "The School of the Elders") and Mahayana
Mahayana
(Sanskrit: "The Great Vehicle")
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Antioch
Antioch
Antioch
on the Orontes (/ˈæntiˌɒk/; Greek: Ἀντιόχεια ἡ ἐπὶ Ὀρόντου, also Syrian Antioch)[note 1] was an ancient Greco-Roman
Greco-Roman
city[1] on the eastern side of the Orontes River. Its ruins lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey, and lends the modern city its name. Antioch
Antioch
was founded near the end of the 4th century
4th century
BC by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals. The city's geographical, military, and economic location benefited its occupants, particularly such features as the spice trade, the Silk Road, and the Persian Royal Road. It eventually rivaled Alexandria
Alexandria
as the chief city of the Near East. It was also the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple
Second Temple
period
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Phylarchus
Phylarchus (Greek: Φύλαρχoς, Phylarkhos; fl. 3rd century BC) was a Greek historical writer whose works have been lost, but not before having been considerably used by other historians whose works have survived.Contents1 Life 2 His influence 3 His style 4 His known works 5 References 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksLife[edit] Phylarchus was a contemporary of Aratus, in the 3rd century BC. His birthplace is doubtful. We learn from the Suda[1] that three different cities are mentioned as his native place, Athens, Naucratis
Naucratis
in Egypt, or Sicyon; but as Athenaeus
Athenaeus
calls him[2] an Athenian or Naucratian, we may leave the claims of Sicyon
Sicyon
out of the question
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Parthian Empire
The Parthian Empire
Empire
(/ˈpɑːrθiən/; 247 BC – 224 AD), also known as the Arsacid Empire
Empire
(/ˈɑːrsəsɪd/),[9] was a major Iranian political and cultural power in ancient Iran
Iran
and Iraq.[10] Its latter name comes from Arsaces I of Parthia[11] who, as leader of the Parni
Parni
tribe, founded it in the mid-3rd century BC when he conquered the region of Parthia[12] in Iran's northeast, then a satrapy (province) in rebellion against the Seleucid Empire. Mithridates I of Parthia
Parthia
(r. c. 171–138 BC) greatly expanded the empire by seizing Media and Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
from the Seleucids. At its height, the Parthian Empire
Empire
stretched from the northern reaches of the Euphrates, in what is now central-eastern Turkey, to eastern Iran
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Arsaces I Of Parthia
Arsaces I (/ˈɑːrsəsiːz/; from Greek: Ἀρσάκης; in Parthian: 𐭀𐭓𐭔𐭊 Aršak, Persian Ashk اشک) was the founder of the Arsacid dynasty of Parthia, and after whom all 30+ monarchs of the Arsacid empire officially named themselves. A celebrated descent from antiquity (the Bagratid "line") begins with Arsaces.[1] Ashk has also given name to the city of Ashkabad.[dubious – discuss]Contents1 Origin 2 Reign 3 See also 4 Notes 5 ReferencesOrigin[edit] The dates of Arsaces' birth and death are unknown, as is his real name
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Bactria
Bactria
Bactria
or Bactriana was the name of a historical region in Central Asia. Bactria
Bactria
proper was north of the Hindu Kush
Hindu Kush
mountain range and south of the Amu Darya
Amu Darya
river,[1] covering the flat region that straddles modern-day Afghanistan, Tajikistan, and Uzbekistan
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Justin (historian)
Justin (Latin: Marcus Junianus Justinus Frontinus;[n 1] c. second century) was a Latin
Latin
historian who lived under the Roman Empire.Contents1 Life 2 Works 3 Legacy 4 Notes 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksLife[edit] Almost nothing is known of Justin's personal history, his name appearing only in the title of his work. He must have lived after Gnaeus Pompeius Trogus, whose work he excerpted, and his references to the Romans and Parthians' having divided the world between themselves would have been anachronistic after the rise of the Sassanians in the third century. His Latin
Latin
appears to be consistent with the style of the second century
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