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Anti-Federalist Papers
Anti-Federalist Papers
Anti-Federalist Papers
is the collective name given to works written by the Founding Fathers who were opposed to or concerned with the merits of the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
of 1787. Starting on 25 September 1787 (8 days after the final draft of the US Constitution) and running through the early 1790s, these anti-Federalists published a series of essays arguing against a stronger and more energetic union as embodied in the new Constitution
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Ratification
Ratification is a principal's approval of an act of its agent where the agent lacked authority to legally bind the principal. Ratification defines the international act whereby a state indicates its consent to be bound to a treaty if the parties intended to show their consent by such an act. In the case of bilateral treaties, ratification is usually accomplished by exchanging the requisite instruments, while in the case of multilateral treaties the usual procedure is for the depositary to collect the ratifications of all states, keeping all parties informed of the situation. The institution of ratification grants states the necessary time-frame to seek the required approval for the treaty on the domestic level and to enact the necessary legislation to give domestic effect to that treaty.[1] The term applies to private contract law, international treaties, and constitutions in federations such as the United States
United States
and Canada
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Robert Yates (politician)
Robert Yates (January 27, 1738 – September 9, 1801) was a politician and judge well known for his Anti-Federalist stances. He is also well known as the presumed author of political essays published in 1787 and 1788 under the pseudonyms "Brutus" and "Sydney". The essays opposed the introduction of the Constitution
Constitution
of the United States. Biography[edit] Robert Yates was born January 27, 1738, in Schenectady, New York, the oldest of 12 children of merchant Joseph Yates and Maria Dunbar. He learned the craft of the surveyor and then decided to pursue a career in law. After clerking for William Livingston
William Livingston
in New York City, in 1760 he was licensed to practice on his own. In 1765, he married Jannette Van Ness and settled in Albany, New York. The couple had six children. Surveying supplemented Yates' attorney's income as he made a number of important land maps during the 1760s
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University Of Chicago
The University
University
of Chicago
Chicago
(UChi, U of C, Chicago, or UChicago) is a private research university in Chicago, Illinois. It holds top-ten positions in various national and international rankings.[9][10][11][12] The university is composed of the College, various graduate programs and interdisciplinary committees organized into five academic research divisions and seven professional schools. Beyond the arts and sciences, Chicago
Chicago
is also well known for its professional schools, which include the Pritzker School of Medicine, the Booth School of Business, the Law School, the School of Social Service Administration, the Harris School of Public Policy Studies, the Divinity School and the Graham School of Continuing Liberal and Professional Studies
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Patrick Henry
Patrick Henry
Patrick Henry
(May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was an American attorney, planter, and orator well known for his declaration to the Second Virginia Convention
Second Virginia Convention
(1775): "Give me liberty, or give me death!" A Founding Father, he served as the first and sixth post-colonial Governor of Virginia, from 1776 to 1779 and from 1784 to 1786. Henry was born in Hanover County, Virginia, and was for the most part educated at home. After an unsuccessful venture running a store, and assisting his father-in-law at Hanover Tavern, Henry became a lawyer through self-study. Beginning his practice in 1760, he soon became prominent though his victory in the Parson's Cause
Parson's Cause
against the Anglican clergy
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Mercy Otis Warren
Mercy Otis Warren
Mercy Otis Warren
(September 14, [September 25, New Style][1] 1728 – October 19, 1814) was a political writer and propagandist of the American Revolution. During the years before the American Revolution, Warren published poems and plays that attacked royal authority in Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and urged colonists to resist British infringements on colonial rights and liberties. She was married to James Warren, who was likewise heavily active in the independence movement. During the debate over the United States Constitution
United States Constitution
in 1788, she issued a pamphlet, Observations on the new Constitution, and on the Federal and State Conventions written under the pseudonym "A Columbian Patriot," that opposed ratification of the document and advocated the inclusion of a Bill of Rights. Observations was long thought to be the work of other writers, most notably Elbridge Gerry
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Samuel Bryan
Samuel Bryan (1759—1821) was a Pennsylvanian Anti-Federalist
Anti-Federalist
author, who wrote during the American Revolution. Historians generally ascribe to him the Letters of Centinel written under the pseudonym Centinel between 1787 and 1789. Centinel attacked the proposed Constitution of the United States as a document in the interests of the "well-born few". He was the son of George Bryan, a judge on the Pennsylvania Supreme Court and the principal Anti-Federalist
Anti-Federalist
in the state, to whom the essays were frequently attributed at the time they were written. Centinel wrote three series of essays. The first eighteen numbers appeared in late 1787 and early 1788, and reflected the Anti-Federalist
Anti-Federalist
opposition to the Constitution. Letters XIX through XXIV were produced toward the end of 1788
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John Williams (Salem, New York)
John Williams (September 1752 – July 22, 1806) was an American physician and politician from Salem, New York.Contents1 Life 2 See also 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksLife[edit] Williams was born in Barnstaple, England
England
in September 1752. He received a liberal education, studied medicine and surgery in St. Thomas' Hospital, London, and served for one year as surgeon’s mate on an English man-of-war. He immigrated to America in 1773 and settled in New Perth, Charlotte County, New York (now Salem, Washington County), where he engaged in an extensive medical practice. He married Susanna (Thomas) Turner, and they had four children. After the death of his first wife, he married Mrs. Mary Townley. Williams was a member of the New York Provincial Congress
New York Provincial Congress
in 1775; he was reelected and served until its dissolution in 1777. He was appointed surgeon of state militia forces in 1775
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Melancton Smith
Melancton Smith (May 7, 1744 – July 29, 1798) was a New York delegate to the Continental Congress. His first name is sometimes spelled "Melancthon"; it derives from Philip Melanchthon, the leader in the Reformation. He was born in Jamaica, Long Island, New York and was homeschooled by his parents. When his family moved to Poughkeepsie, New York, he became involved in the mercantile business.[1] In 1769 he helped organize the Washington Hollow Presbyterian Church. He became a delegate to the first New York Provincial Congress
New York Provincial Congress
in New York on May 22, 1775. He served in the Continental Line Regiment on June 30, 1775, which he organized as the Dutchess County Rangers. On Feb. 11, 1777, he became one of three members of a Dutchess County commission for "inquiring into, detecting and defeating all conspiracies ..
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George Clinton (vice President)
George Clinton (July 26, 1739 – April 20, 1812)[1] was an American soldier and statesman, considered one of the Founding Fathers of the United States. A prominent Democratic-Republican, Clinton served as the fourth Vice President of the United States
Vice President of the United States
from 1805 until his death in 1812. He also served as Governor of New York
Governor of New York
from 1777 to 1795 and from 1801 to 1804. Along with John C. Calhoun, he is one of two vice presidents to hold office under two different presidents. Clinton served in the French and Indian War, rising to the rank of lieutenant in the colonial militia. He began a legal practice after the war and served as a district attorney for New York City
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List Of Pseudonyms Used In The American Constitutional Debates
During the debates over the design and ratification of the United States Constitution, in 1787 and 1788, a large number of writers in the popular press used pseudonyms. This list shows some of the more important commentaries and the (known or presumed) authors responsible for them. Note: the identity of the person behind several of these pseudonyms is not known for certain.Pseudonym Author NotesA.B. Francis Hopkinson Federalist.[1]Agrippa James Winthrop[2] Eighteen essays appeared under this name in the Massachusetts Gazette between November 23, 1787 and February 5, 1788.[3]Alfredus Samuel Tenney Federalist.[4]Americanus John Stevens, Jr.[5]Aristedes Alexander Contee Hanson Federalist.[6]Aristocrotis William Petrikin Anti-Federalist.[7]An Assemblyman William FindleyBrutus Robert Yates[2] Anti-Federalist. After Marcus Junius Brutus, a Roman republican involved in the assassination of Caesar
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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American Revolutionary War
Allied victory:Peace of Paris British recognition of American independence End of the First British Empire British retention of Canada
Canada
and GibraltarTerritorial changesGreat Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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LibriVox
LibriVox
LibriVox
is a group of worldwide volunteers who read and record public domain texts creating free public domain audiobooks for download from their website and other digital library hosting sites on the internet. It was founded in 2005 by Hugh McGuire to provide "Acoustical liberation of books in the public domain"[1] and the LibriVox objective is "To make all books in the public domain available, for free, in audio format on the internet".[2] By the end of 2017, LibriVox
LibriVox
had a catalog of over 12,000 works and from 2009–2017 was producing about 1,000 per year.[3] Most releases are in the English language, but many non-English works are also available. There are multiple affiliated projects that are providing additional content
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Akhil Amar
Akhil Reed Amar (born September 6, 1958) is an American legal scholar, an expert on constitutional law and criminal procedure. Formerly the Southmayd Professor of Law at Yale Law School, he was named Sterling Professor of Law in 2008[1] and Adjunct Professor of Law at Columbia Law School in 2016.[2] A Legal Affairs poll placed Amar among the top 20 contemporary US legal thinkers.[3]Contents1 Life and career 2 Books 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksLife and career[edit] Amar was born in Ann Arbor, Michigan, where his parents were medical students from India
India
studying at the University of Michigan. His parents later became U.S
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