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Anthropodermic Bibliopegy
Anthropodermic bibliopegy
Anthropodermic bibliopegy
is the practice of binding books in human skin. As of April 2016, The Anthropodermic Book Project "has identified 47 alleged anthropodermic books in the world's libraries and museums. Of those, 30 books have been tested or are in the process of being tested. Seventeen of the books have been confirmed as having human skin bindings and nine were proven to be not of human origin but of sheep, pig, cow, or other animals."[1] (The confirmed figures as of August 2017 have increased to 18 bindings identified as human and 14 disproved.[2])Contents1 Terminology 2 History 3 Examples 4 Identification 5 Ethical and legal issues 6 Popular culture 7 Notes 8 Further readingTerminology[edit] Bibliopegy (/bɪblɪˈɒpɪdʒi/ bib-li-OP-i-jee) is a rare[3][4] synonym for bookbinding
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College Of Physicians Of Philadelphia
The College of Physicians of Philadelphia
College of Physicians of Philadelphia
is the oldest private medical society in the United States. Founded in 1787 by 24 Philadelphia physicians "to advance the Science of Medicine, and thereby lessen human misery, by investigating the diseases and remedies which are peculiar to our country" and to promote "order and uniformity in the practice of Physick," it has made important contributions to medical education and research
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National Library Of Australia
The National Library of Australia
Australia
is the largest reference library in Australia, responsible under the terms of the National Library Act for "maintaining and developing a national collection of library material, including a comprehensive collection of library material relating to Australia
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James Allen (highwayman)
James Allen (1809-1837), also known as George Walton, Jonas Pierce, James H. York, Burley Grove, was a Massachusetts highwayman in the early 19th century.[1] One man fought back when Allen attempted to rob him, and that was John Fenno. After a prolonged life of banditry, Allen was eventually imprisoned in the Massachusetts State Prison, which opened in 1805, in Charlestown, Boston, Massachusetts. He died in prison, and is remembered for delivering a deathbed confession to the warden in 1837, one copy of which was bound in the author's skin. This 40 page copy of the Narrative of the Life of James Allen, alias Jonas Pierce, alias James H. York, alias Burley Grove, the Highwayman, Being His Death-bed Confession to the Warden of the Massachusetts State Prison now belongs to the Boston Athenaeum.[2] Other copies are extant and can be found in other libraries. A scan of the text is freely available from the Internet Archive
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Royal College Of Surgeons Of Edinburgh
The Royal College of Surgeons of Edinburgh
Edinburgh
(RCSEd) is a professional organisation of surgeons located in Nicolson Street, Edinburgh, within the William Henry Playfair
William Henry Playfair
designed Surgeons' Hall
Surgeons' Hall
and adjoining buildings. It is one of the oldest surgical corporations in the world[1] and traces its origins to 1505 when the Barber Surgeons of Edinburgh
Edinburgh
were formally incorporated as a craft guild of Edinburgh. The Barber-Surgeons of Dublin was the first medical corporation in Ireland or Britain, having been incorporated in 1446 (by Royal Decree of Henry VI). It represents members and fellows across the UK and the world
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Alexander Monro (tertius)
Alexander Monro III of Craiglockhart, FRSE FRCPE FSA(Scot) MWS (5 November 1773 – 10 March 1859), was a Scottish anatomist and medical educator at the University of Edinburgh Medical School. According to his detractors, Monro was an uninspired anatomist who did not compare with his brilliant father or grandfather as a teacher or scientist. His students included Charles Darwin who asserted that Monro "made his lectures on human anatomy as dull as he was himself."[1]Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 In popular culture 4 See also 5 ReferencesLife[edit]Alexander Monro by John Watson GordonThe coat of arms of Alexander Monro, Dean CemeteryBorn at Nicolson Street[2] in Edinburgh on 5 November 1773, he was the son of Dr Alexander Monro. He was educated at the High School of Edinburgh, close to his home, then studoed Medicine at Edinburgh University receiving his doctorate (M.D.) in 1797
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Newberry Library
The Newberry Library
Newberry Library
is an independent research library, specializing in the humanities and located on Washington Square in Chicago, Illinois. It has been free and open to the public since 1887. Its collections encompass a variety of topics related to the history and cultural production of Western Europe
Western Europe
and the Americas over the last six centuries. The Library is named to honor the founding bequest from the estate of philanthropist Walter Loomis Newberry
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The Time Traveler's Wife
The Time Traveler's Wife is the debut novel of American author Audrey Niffenegger, published in 2003. It is a love story about a man with a genetic disorder that causes him to time travel unpredictably, and about his wife, an artist, who has to cope with his frequent absences and dangerous experiences. Niffenegger, frustrated in love when she began the work, wrote the story as a metaphor for her failed relationships. The tale's central relationship came to her suddenly and subsequently supplied the novel's title. The novel, which has been classified as both science fiction and romance, examines issues of love, loss, and free will. In particular, it uses time travel to explore miscommunication and distance in relationships, while also investigating deeper existential questions. As a first-time novelist, Niffenegger had trouble finding a literary agent
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Camille Flammarion
Nicolas Camille Flammarion
Camille Flammarion
FRAS[1] (26 February 1842 – 3 June 1925) was a French astronomer and author. He was a prolific author of more than fifty titles, including popular science works about astronomy, several notable early science fiction novels, and works on psychical research and related topics. He also published the magazine L'Astronomie, starting in 1882. He maintained a private observatory at Juvisy-sur-Orge, France.Contents1 Biography 2 Family 3 Mars 4 Psychical research 5 Legacy 6 Honors 7 Quotations 8 Works 9 References 10 External linksBiography[edit] Camille Flammarion
Camille Flammarion
was born in Montigny-le-Roi, Haute-Marne, France. He was the brother of Ernest Flammarion (1846–1936), founder of the Groupe Flammarion publishing house
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Dale Carnegie
Dale Harbison Carnegie (/ˈkɑːrnɪɡi/;[1] spelled Carnagey until c. 1922; November 24, 1888 – November 1, 1955) was an American writer and lecturer and the developer of famous courses in self-improvement, salesmanship, corporate training, public speaking, and interpersonal skills. Born into poverty on a farm in Missouri, he was the author of How to Win Friends and Influence People
How to Win Friends and Influence People
(1936), a bestseller that remains popular today
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Lincoln The Unknown
Lincoln the Unknown is a biography of Abraham Lincoln, written in 1932 by Dale Carnegie. It is published by Dale Carnegie and Associates, and given out as a prize in the Dale Carnegie Course.Contents1 Summary 2 Inspirations and writing process 3 Praise 4 References 5 BibliographySummary[edit] Abraham Lincoln, a farm boy, becomes the president of The United States. He travels miles to borrow books; reading being the dominant passion of his for quarter of a century. He mourns the loss of his first love his whole life. He humors his colleagues in the White House, and lives with the difficulties of the marriage with his second love, while in war with the South. Inspirations and writing process[edit] One spring day, Dale Carnegie was breakfasting at a hotel in London. He came across a column in the Morning Post newspaper entitled "Men and Memories"
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Temple University
Temple University
Temple University
(Temple or TU) is a public research university located in the Cecil B. Moore neighborhood of Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States. It was founded in 1884 by Baptist Minister Russell Conwell. In 1882, Conwell came to Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
to lead the Grace Baptist Church while he began tutoring working class citizens late at night to accommodate their work schedules. These students, later dubbed "night owls", were taught in the basement of Conwell's Baptist Temple, hence the origin of the university's name and mascot
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Henry Garnet
Henry Garnet
Henry Garnet
(July 1555 – 3 May 1606), sometimes Henry Garnett, was an English Jesuit
Jesuit
priest executed for his complicity in the Gunpowder Plot of 1605. Born in Heanor, Derbyshire, he was educated in Nottingham
Nottingham
and later at Winchester College
Winchester College
before he moved to London in 1571 to work for a publisher. There he professed an interest in legal studies and in 1575, he travelled to the continent and joined the Society of Jesus. He was ordained in Rome some time around 1582. In 1586, Garnet returned to England as part of the Jesuit
Jesuit
mission, soon succeeding Father William Weston as Jesuit
Jesuit
superior, following the latter's capture by the English authorities
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Marquis De Sade
Donatien Alphonse François, Marquis
Marquis
de Sade (2 June 1740 – 2 December 1814) (French: [maʁki də sad]), was a French nobleman, revolutionary politician, philosopher, and writer, famous for his libertine sexuality. His works include novels, short stories, plays, dialogues, and political tracts; in his lifetime some were published under his own name, while others appeared anonymously, of which Sade denied being the author. Sade is best known for his erotic works, which combined philosophical discourse with pornography, depicting sexual fantasies with an emphasis on violence, criminality, and blasphemy against Christianity. He was a proponent of extreme freedom, unrestrained by morality, religion, or law
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Gunpowder Plot
The Gunpowder Plot
The Gunpowder Plot
of 1605, in earlier centuries often called the Gunpowder
Gunpowder
Treason
Treason
Plot or the Jesuit
Jesuit
Treason, was a failed assassination attempt against King James I
James I
of England and VI of Scotland by a group of provincial English Catholics led by Robert Catesby. The plan was to blow up the House of Lords
House of Lords
during the State Opening of England's Parliament on 5 November 1605, as the prelude to a popular revolt in the Midlands during which James's nine-year-old daughter, Princess Elizabeth, was to be installed as the Catholic head of state. Catesby may have embarked on the scheme after hopes of securing greater religious tolerance under King James had faded, leaving many English Catholics disappointed
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Leonard Smithers
Leonard Charles Smithers (/ˈsmɪðərz/; 19 December 1861 – 19 December 1907)[1] was a London publisher associated with the Decadent movement.Contents1 Biography 2 Translations 3 References 4 SourcesBiography[edit] Born in Sheffield, Smithers worked as a solicitor, qualifying in 1884,[2] and became friendly with the explorer and orientalist Sir Richard Francis Burton. He published Burton's translation of the Book of One Thousand and One Nights in 1885. He collaborated with Burton in a translation from the Latin of the Carmina of Caius Valerius Catullus and Priapeia, a collection of erotic poems by various writers. He also published a limited edition of the Satyricon of Petronius Arbiter. Smithers published works by Aubrey Beardsley, Max Beerbohm, Aleister Crowley, Ernest Dowson, Arthur Symons and Oscar Wilde and lesser known figures such as Vincent O'Sullivan and Nigel Tourneur. With Symons and Beardsley, he founded The Savoy, a periodical which ran to eight issues in 1896
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