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Anthropocentrism
Anthropocentrism is (/ˌænθroʊpoʊˈsɛntrɪzəm/;[1] from Greek Ancient Greek: ἄνθρωπος, ánthrōpos, "human being"; and Ancient Greek: κέντρον, kéntron, "center") is the belief that human beings are the most significant entity of the universe. Anthropocentrism interprets or regards the world in terms of human values and experiences.[2] The term can be used interchangeably with humanocentrism, and some refer to the concept as human supremacy or human exceptionalism. Anthropocentrism is considered to be profoundly embedded in many modern human cultures and conscious acts
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Anthropocentric (album)
Anthropocentric is the fifth studio album by German metal band The Ocean. It is the second album in a 2 album series, following Heliocentric. Anthropocentric continues the critique of Christianity as in its companion album Heliocentric. The album was released in North America on November 9, 2010.Contents1 Theme 2 Music 3 Recording 4 Track listing 5 Personnel5.1 The Ocean 5.2 Additional personnel6 Reception 7 References 8 External linksTheme[edit] Like its companion Heliocentric, Anthropocentric focuses on critique of Fundamentalist Christianity and Creationism. It calls into question the beliefs of "creationists" and "modern fundamentalists" who assert that "the earth is at the center of the universe" as well as the belief that the Earth is "no more than 5,000 years old."[2] The band places the theme of the album focuses on "man and his place in the universe"
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Biological
A biopharmaceutical, also known as a biologic(al) medical product, biological,[1] or biologic, is any pharmaceutical drug product manufactured in, extracted from, or semisynthesized from biological sources. Different from totally synthesized pharmaceuticals, they include vaccines, blood, blood components, allergenics, somatic cells, gene therapies, tissues, recombinant therapeutic protein, and living cells used in cell therapy. Biologics can be composed of sugars, proteins, or nucleic acids or complex combinations of these substances, or may be living cells or tissues. They (or their precursors or components) are isolated from living sources—human, animal, plant, fungal, or microbial. Terminology surrounding biopharmaceuticals varies between groups and entities, with different terms referring to different subsets of therapeutics within the general biopharmaceutical category
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Stewardship
Stewardship is an ethic that embodies the responsible planning and management of resources. The concepts of stewardship can be applied to the environment and nature,[1][2] economics,[3][4] health,[5] property,[6] information,[7] theology,[8] etc.Contents1 History of the term 2 Notable organisations 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory of the term[edit] Stewardship was originally made up of the tasks of a domestic steward, from stiġ (house, hall) and weard, (ward, guard, guardian, keeper).[9][10] Stewardship in the beginning referred to the household servant’s duties for bringing food and drink to the castle’s dining hall
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Natural And Legal Rights
Natural and legal rights
Natural and legal rights
are two types of rights. Natural rights are those that are not dependent on the laws or customs of any particular culture or government, and so are universal and inalienable (they cannot be repealed or restrained by human laws). Legal rights are those bestowed onto a person by a given legal system (they can be modified, repealed, and restrained by human laws). The concept of natural law is related to the concept of natural rights. Natural law
Natural law
first appeared in ancient Greek philosophy,[1] and was referred to by Roman philosopher
Roman philosopher
Cicero. It was subsequently alluded to in the Bible,[2] and then developed in the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
by Catholic philosophers such as Albert the Great
Albert the Great
and his pupil Thomas Aquinas
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Human Rights
Human rights
Human rights
are moral principles or norms[1] that describe certain standards of human behaviour, and are regularly protected as legal rights in municipal and international law.[2] They are commonly understood as inalienable[3] fundamental rights "to which a person is inherently entitled simply because she or he is a human being",[4] and which are "inherent in all human beings"[5] regardless of their nation, location, language, religion, ethnic origin or any other status.[3] They are applicable everywhere and at every time in the sense of being universal,[1] and they are egalitarian in the sense of being the same f
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Universal Human Rights
Human rights are moral principles or norms[1] that describe certain standards of human behaviour, and are regularly protected as legal rights in municipal and international law.[2] They are commonly understood as inalienable[3] fundamental rights "to which a person is inherently entitled simply because she or he is a human being",[4] and which are "inherent in all human beings"[5] regardless of their nation, location, language, religion, ethnic origin or any other status.[3] They are applicable everywhere and at every time in the sense of being universal,[1] and they are egalitarian in the sense of being the same for everyone.[3] They are regarded as requiring empathy and the rule of law[6] and imposing an obligation on persons to respect the human rights of others,[1][3] and it is generally considered that they should not be taken away except as a result of due process based on specific circumstances;[3] for example, human rights may include freedom from unlawful imprisonment, torture
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Mortimer J. Adler
Mortimer Jerome Adler (December 28, 1902 – June 28, 2001) was an American philosopher, educator, and popular author. As a philosopher he worked within the Aristotelian and Thomistic
Thomistic
traditions
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Wesley J. Smith
Wesley J. Smith (born 1949) is an American lawyer and author, a Senior Fellow at the Discovery Institute's Center on Human Exceptionalism, a politically conservative[1][2] non-profit think tank, best known for its advocacy of intelligent design (ID). He is also a consultant for the Patients Rights Council.[3] Smith is known for his criticism of assisted suicide and utilitarian bioethics. Smith has authored or co-authored fourteen books. He formerly collaborated with consumer advocate Ralph Nader, and has been published in regional and national outlets such as The New York Times,[4] Newsweek,[5] The Wall Street Journal,[6] USA Today,[7] the San Francisco Chronicle,[8] The Seattle Times,[9] the New York Post,[10] and others.[11] He is also well known for his blog, "Human Exceptionalism", hosted by National Review, which advances his theory of "human exceptionalism" and defends intrinsic human dignity
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Discovery Institute
The Discovery Institute
Discovery Institute
(DI) is a politically conservative[4][5][6] non-profit think tank based in Seattle, Washington, that advocates the pseudoscientific principle[7][8][9] of intelligent design (ID). Its "Teach the Controversy" campaign aims to permit teaching of anti-evolution, intelligent-design beliefs in United States
United States
public high school science courses alongside accepted scientific theories, positing that a scientific controversy exists over these subjects.[10][11][12][13][14][15][16]Contents1 History 2 Organization2.1 Officers, directors and fellows 2.2 Center for Science and Culture 2.3 Biologic Institute3 Programs3.1 Intelligent design
Intelligent design
and Teach the Controversy 3.2 Cascadia Center 3.3 Technology and Democracy Project 3.4 The Real Russia
Russia
Project 3.5 C. S. Lewis
C. S

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Cognitive Psychology
Cognitive psychology
Cognitive psychology
is the study of mental processes such as "attention, language use, memory, perception, problem solving, creativity, and thinking".[1] Much of the work derived from cognitive psychology has been integrated into various other modern disciplines of psychological study, including educational psychology, social psychology, personality psychology, abnormal psychology, developmental psychology, and economics.Contents1 History 2 Mental processes2.1 Attention 2.2 Memory2.2.1 Working memory 2.2.2 Long-term memory2.3 Perception 2.4 Language 2.5 Metacognition3 Modern 4 Applications4.1 Abnormal psychology 4.2 Social psychology 4.3 Developmental psychology 4.4 Educational psychology 4.5 Personality psychology5 Cognitive psychology
Cognitive psychology
vs
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Analogy
Analogy
Analogy
(from Greek ἀναλογία, analogia, "proportion"[1][2]) is a cognitive process of transferring information or meaning from a particular subject - the analog or source, to another - the target, or a linguistic expression corresponding to such a process. In a narrower sense, analogy is an inference or an argument from one particular to another particular, as opposed to deduction, induction, and abduction, where at least one of the premises or the conclusion is general
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Scientific Misconceptions
Scientific misconceptions are commonly held beliefs about science that have no basis in actual scientific fact. Scientific misconceptions can also refer to preconceived notions based on religious and/or cultural influences. Many scientific misconceptions occur because of faulty teaching styles and the sometimes distancing nature of true scientific texts.Contents1 Types 2 Identifying student misconceptions 3 Addressing student misconceptions 4 See also 5 References 6 FootnotesTypes[edit] Misconceptions (a.k.a
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Book Of Genesis
The Book
Book
of Genesis (from the Latin Vulgate, in turn borrowed or transliterated from Greek γένεσις, meaning "Origin"; Hebrew: בְּרֵאשִׁית‬, Bərēšīṯ, "In [the] beginning") is the first book of the Hebrew Bible
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Programmed Cell Death
Programmed cell death
Programmed cell death
(or PCD) is the death of a cell in any form, mediated by an intracellular program.[1][2] PCD is carried out in a biological process, which usually confers advantage during an organism's life-cycle. For example, the differentiation of fingers and toes in a developing human embryo occurs because cells between the fingers apoptose; the result is that the digits are separate. PCD serves fundamental functions during both plant and animal tissue development. Apoptosis
Apoptosis
and autophagy are both forms of programmed cell death, but necrosis was long seen as a non-physiological process that occurs as a result of infection or injury.[3] Necrosis
Necrosis
is the death of a cell caused by external factors such as trauma or infection and occurs in several different forms
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Ecosystem
An ecosystem can be defined as a community made up of living organisms and nonliving components such as air, water and mineral soil.[2] However, ecosystems can be defined in many ways.[3] The biotic and abiotic components interact through nutrient cycles and energy flows.[4] Ecosystems include a network of interactions among organisms, and between organisms and their environment.[5] Ecosystems can be of any size but one ecosystem has a specific, limited space.[6] Some scientists view the entire planet as one ecosystem.[7] Energy, water, nitrogen and soil minerals are other essential abiotic components of an ecosystem. The energy that flows through ecosystems comes primarily from the sun, through photosynthesis. Photosynthesis also captures carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Animals also play an important role in the movement of matter and energy through ecoystems. They influence the amount of plant and microbial biomass that lives in the system
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