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Anne Of Brittany
Anne of Brittany
Brittany
(French: Anne de Bretagne; Breton: Anna Breizh) (25/26 January 1477[1] – 9 January 1514[2]) was Duchess of Brittany from 1488 until her death, and queen consort of France
France
from 1491 to 1498 and from 1499 to her death. She is the only woman to have been queen consort of France
France
twice. During the Italian Wars, Anne also became queen consort of Naples, from 1501 to 1504, and duchess consort of Milan, in 1499–1500 and from 1500 to 1512. Anne was raised in Nantes
Nantes
during a series of conflicts in which the king of France
France
sought to assert his suzerainty over Brittany. Her father, Francis II, Duke of Brittany, was the last male of the House of Montfort. Upon his death in 1488, Anne became duchess regnant of Brittany, countess of Nantes, Montfort, and Richmond, and viscountess of Limoges
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Anne De Bretagne (rock Opera)
Bretagne may refer toContents1 Places 2 Ships 3 Other 4 See alsoPlaces[edit]Brittany, the historic province of France, called in French Bretagne Brittany
Brittany
(administrative region), the present-day French region, also called in French Bretagne, smaller than the historic province Bretagne, Indre, a French village in the Indre department Bretagne, Territoire de Belfort, a French village in the Territoire de Belfort department Bretagne-d'Armagn
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Château
A château (plural châteaux; French pronunciation: ​[ʃɑto] in both cases) is a manor house or residence of the lord of the manor or a country house of nobility or gentry, with or without fortifications, originally—and still most frequently—in French-speaking regions.[1]Contents1 Definition 2 Concept 3 French châteaux3.1 Loire Valley 3.2 Vaux-le-Vicomte 3.3 Château
Château
de Chenonceau 3.4 Dampierre-en-Yvelines 3.5 Versailles 3.6 Bordeaux4 See also 5 References 6 External linksDefinition[edit] The word "chateau" is a French word that has entered the English language, where its meaning is more specific than it is in French. The French word "chateau" denotes buildings as diverse as a medieval fortress, a Renaissance palace and a 19th-century country house. Care should therefore be taken when translating the French word château into English, noting the nature of the building in question
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Montfort-l'Amaury
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Montfort-l'Amaury
Montfort-l'Amaury
is a commune in the Yvelines
Yvelines
department in the Île-de- France
France
region in north-central France. It is located in the south-western suburbs of Paris 20 km (12 mi) north of Rambouillet. The name comes from Amaury I de Montfort, the first count of Montfort.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Sites of interest 4 People 5 Twin towns 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksGeography[edit] Montfort-l'Amaury
Montfort-l'Amaury
lies north of the Rambouillet
Rambouillet
Forest
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Limoges
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Limoges
Limoges
(/lɪˈmoʊʒ/;[1] French pronunciation: ​[limɔʒ];[1] Occitan: Lemòtges or Limòtges [liˈmɔdʒes]) is a city and commune, the capital of the Haute-Vienne
Haute-Vienne
department and was the administrative capital of the former Limousin
Limousin
region in west-central France. Limoges
Limoges
is known for its medieval and Renaissance enamels (Limoges enamels) on copper, for its 19th-century porcelain ( Limoges
Limoges
porcelain) and for its oak barrels which are used for Cognac and Bordeaux production
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Proxy Marriage
A proxy wedding or (proxy marriage) is a wedding in which one or both of the individuals being united are not physically present, usually being represented instead by other persons. If both partners are absent a double proxy wedding occurs. Marriage by proxy is usually resorted to either when a couple wish to marry but one or both partners cannot attend for reasons such as military service, imprisonment, or travel restrictions; or when a couple lives in a jurisdiction in which they cannot legally marry. Proxy weddings are not recognized as legally binding in most jurisdictions: both parties must be present
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Salic Law
The Salic law
Salic law
(/ˈsælɪk/ or /ˈseɪlɪk/; Latin: Lex salica), or the Salian law, was the ancient Salian Frankish civil law code compiled around AD 500 by the first Frankish King, Clovis. Written in Latin, or in "semi-French Latin" according to some linguists,[1] it also contains what Dutch linguists describe as one of the earliest known records of Old Dutch, perhaps second only to the Bergakker inscription.[2] It remained the basis of Frankish law throughout the early Medieval period, and influenced future European legal systems. The best-known tenet of the old law is the principle of exclusion of women from inheritance of thrones, fiefs and other property. The Salic laws were arbitrated by a committee appointed and empowered by the King of the Franks
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Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor
Charles V (Spanish: Carlos; German: Karl; Italian: Carlo; Latin: Carolus; Dutch: Karel; French: Charles, [a] 24 February 1500 – 21 September 1558) was ruler of both the Spanish Empire
Spanish Empire
as Charles I from 1516 and the Holy Roman Empire
Holy Roman Empire
as Charles V from 1519, as well as of the lands of the former Duchy of Burgundy
Duchy of Burgundy
from 1506. He voluntarily stepped down from these and other positions by a series of abdications between 1554 and 1556. Through inheritance, he brought together under his rule extensive territories in western, central, and southern Europe, and the Spanish viceroyalties in the Americas and Asia
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Romantic Period
Romanticism
Romanticism
(also known as the Romantic era) was an artistic, literary, musical and intellectual movement that originated in Europe toward the end of the 18th century, and in most areas was at its peak in the approximate period from 1800 to 1850. Romanticism
Romanticism
was characterized by its emphasis on emotion and individualism as well as glorification of all the past and nature, preferring the medieval rather than the classical
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Loire Valley
The Loire Valley
Loire Valley
(French: Vallée de la Loire, pronounced [vale də la lwaʁ]), spanning 480 kilometres (300 mi), is located in the middle stretch of the Loire River in central France, in both the administrative regions Pays de la Loire
Pays de la Loire
and Centre-Val de Loire
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Amboise
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Amboise
Amboise
(pronounced [ɑ̃bwaz]) is a commune in the Indre-et-Loire
Indre-et-Loire
department in central France. It lies on the banks of the Loire River, 27 kilometres (17 mi) east of Tours. Today a small market town, it was once home of the French royal court. The town of Amboise
Amboise
is also only about 18 kilometres (11 mi) away from the historic Château
Château
de Chenonceau, situated on the Cher River near the small village of Chenonceaux
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Duchess Consort Of Milan
A duke (male) (British English: /djuːk/[1] or American English: /duːk/[2]) or duchess (female) can either be a monarch ruling over a duchy or a member of the nobility, historically of highest rank below the monarch. The title comes from French duc, itself from the Latin dux, 'leader', a term used in republican Rome to refer to a military commander without an official rank (particularly one of Germanic or Celtic origin), and later coming to mean the leading military commander of a province. The title dux survived in the Eastern Roman Empire where it was used in several contexts signifying a rank equivalent to a captain or general. Later on, in the 11th century, the title Megas Doux was introduced for the post of commander-in-chief of the entire navy. During the Middle Ages the title (as Herzog) signified first among the Germanic monarchies
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Château Des Ducs De Bretagne
The Château des ducs de Bretagne (English: Castle of the Dukes of Brittany) is a large castle located in the city of Nantes in the Loire-Atlantique département of France; it served as the centre of the historical province of Brittany until its separation in 1941. It is located on the right bank of the Loire, which formerly fed its ditches. It was the residence of the Dukes of Brittany between the 13th and 16th centuries, subsequently becoming the Breton residence of the French Monarchy. The castle has been listed as a monument historique by the French Ministry of Culture since 1862
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Loire-Atlantique
Loire-Atlantique
Loire-Atlantique
(French pronunciation: ​[lwaʁatlɑ̃tik]; formerly Loire-Inférieure) is a department on the west coast of France
France
named after the Loire River
Loire River
and the Atlantic Ocean.Contents1 History 2 Geography 3 Culture 4 Transport 5 Tourism 6 See also 7 External linksHistory[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (July 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Historical regions of Brittany before 1790 Loire-Atlantique
Loire-Atlantique
is one of the original 83 departments created during the French Revolution
French Revolution
on March 4, 1790
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Departments Of France
(including overseas)Departments (including overseas)ArrondissementsCantonsIntercommunality Métropole Communauté urbaine Communauté d'agglomération Communauté de communesCommunes Associated communes Municipal arrondissementsOthers in Overseas France Overseas collectivities Sui generis collectivity Overseas country Overseas territory Clipperton IslandIn the administrative divisions of France, the department (French: département, pronounced [depaʁt(ə)mɑ̃]) is one of the three levels of government below the national level ("territorial collectivities"), between the administrative regions and the commune. There are 96 departments in metropolitan France, and 5 overseas departments, which are also classified as regions
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Salic Law
The Salic law
Salic law
(/ˈsælɪk/ or /ˈseɪlɪk/; Latin: Lex salica), or the Salian law, was the ancient Salian Frankish civil law code compiled around AD 500 by the first Frankish King, Clovis. Written in Latin, or in "semi-French Latin" according to some linguists,[1] it also contains what Dutch linguists describe as one of the earliest known records of Old Dutch, perhaps second only to the Bergakker inscription.[2] It remained the basis of Frankish law throughout the early Medieval period, and influenced future European legal systems. The best-known tenet of the old law is the principle of exclusion of women from inheritance of thrones, fiefs and other property. The Salic laws were arbitrated by a committee appointed and empowered by the King of the Franks
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