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Anne Of Denmark, Electress Of Saxony
Anne of Denmark
Anne of Denmark
(Danish and German: Anna; Haderslev, 22 November 1532 - Dresden, 1 October 1585) was a Danish princess from the House of Oldenburg. Through her marriage with Augustus of Saxony
Augustus of Saxony
she became Electress of Saxony. She was renowned for her knowledge of plants and her skill in the preparation of herbal remedies, and contributed to the development of farming and horticulture in Saxony
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Queen Consort
A queen consort is the wife of a reigning king (or an empress consort in the case of an emperor). A queen consort usually shares her husband's social rank and status. She holds the feminine equivalent of the king's monarchical titles, but historically, she does not share the king's political and military powers. A queen regnant is a queen in her own right with all the powers of a monarch, who (usually) has become queen by inheriting the throne upon the death of the previous monarch. In Brunei, the wife of the Sultan
Sultan
is known as a Raja Isteri with prefix Pengiran Anak, equivalent to queen consort in English, as were the consorts of tsars when Bulgaria
Bulgaria
was still a monarchy.[clarification needed]Contents1 Titles 2 Role 3 Examples of queens and empresses consort 4 See alsoTitles[edit] The title of king consort for the husband of a reigning queen is rare, but not unheard of
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Imprisonment
Imprisonment (from imprison Old French, French emprisonner, from en in + prison prison, from Latin prensio, arrest, from prehendere, prendere, to seize) is the restraint of a person's liberty, for any cause whatsoever, whether by authority of the government, or by a person acting without such authority. In the latter case it is "false imprisonment". Imprisonment does not necessarily imply a place of confinement, with bolts and bars, but may be exercised by any use or display of force, lawfully or unlawfully, wherever displayed, even in the open street
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Calvinism
Calvinism
Calvinism
(also called the Reformed tradition, Reformed Christianity, Reformed Protestantism, or the Reformed faith) is a major branch of Protestantism
Protestantism
that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice of John Calvin
John Calvin
and other Reformation-era theologians. Calvinists broke from the Roman Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in the 16th century. Calvinists differ from Lutherans on the real presence of Christ
Christ
in the Eucharist, theories of worship, and the use of God's law for believers, among other things.[1][2] As declared in the Westminster and Second Helvetic confessions, the core doctrines are predestination and election
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Medicinal Plants
Medicinal plants, also called medicinal herbs, have been discovered and used in traditional medicine practices since prehistoric times. Plants
Plants
synthesise hundreds of chemical compounds for functions including defence against insects, fungi, diseases, and herbivorous mammals. Numerous phytochemicals with potential or established biological activity have been identified. However, since a single plant contains widely diverse phytochemicals, the effects of using a whole plant as medicine are uncertain
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Protestantism
Protestantism
Protestantism
is the second largest form of Christianity
Christianity
with collectively more than 900 million adherents worldwide or nearly 40% of all Christians.[1][2][3][a] It originated with the Reformation,[b] a movement against what its followers con
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Maurice, Elector Of Saxony
Elector may refer to: Prince-elector
Prince-elector
or elector, a member of the electoral college of the Holy Roman Empire, having the function of electing the Holy Roman Emperors Elector, a member of an electoral collegeConfederate elector, a member of the Electoral College (Confederate States), which elected the President Jefferson Davis, and Vice President Alexander H. Stephens U.S
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Torgau
Torgau
Torgau
is a town on the banks of the Elbe
Elbe
in northwestern Saxony, Germany. It is the capital of the district Nordsachsen. Outside Germany, the town is best known as the place where, on 25 April 1945, US and Soviet forces first met near the end of the Second World War.Contents1 Sights 2 History2.1 World War II 2.2 Post–World War II 2.3 Mayors of Torgau
Torgau
(1359-1600)3 Population development 4 Gallery 5 Notable Residents 6 References 7 External links7.1 MultimediaSights[edit] Sights include the historic town centre, restored since the unification, a brewery museum, the monument for the meeting of the Russian and American troops on the Elbe
Elbe
and a Russian military cemetery
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Albertinian Line
The Albertinian line was a line of the Habsburg dynasty, begun by Duke Albert III of Austria, who, after death of his elder brother Rudolf IV, divided the Habsburg hereditary lands with his brother Leopold III by the 1379 Treaty of Neuberg. The branch finally became extinct in the male line with the early death of Ladislaus the Posthumous
Ladislaus the Posthumous
in 1457. History[edit] According to the terms of the treaty, Albert was the ruler over the Duchy of Austria
Duchy of Austria
proper, while the southern territories (Inner Austria) were ruled by his brother - Leopold III, ancestor of the Leopoldian line. Albert ruled over Austria until his death in 1395. His only son and heir was also called Albert, he took the rule over his territories as Albert IV and quickly came to terms with his Leopoldian cousins William, Leopold IV, Ernest and Frederick IV
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House Of Wettin
Ernestine branch: (see more)Tsar of Bulgaria Grand Duke
Duke
of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach King of the Belgians King of Portugal King/Queen of the United KingdomAlbertine branch: (see more)King of Saxony King of PolandCadet branchesSaxe-Weimar-Eisenach Saxe-Meiningen Saxe-Coburg
Saxe-Coburg
and GothaHouse of WindsorSaxonyThe House of Wettin
House of Wettin
(German: Haus Wettin) is a dynasty of German counts, dukes, prince-electors and kings that once ruled territories in the present-day German states of Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt
Saxony-Anhalt
and Thuringia. The dynasty is one of the oldest in Europe, and its origins can be traced back to the town of Wettin, Saxony-Anhalt. The Wettins gradually rose to power within the Holy Roman Empire. Members of the family became the rulers of several medieval states, starting with the Saxon Eastern March
Saxon Eastern March
in 1030
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Weißenfels
Weißenfels
Weißenfels
(IPA: [ˈvaɪsənˌfɛls]; often written in English as Weissenfels) is the largest town of the Burgenlandkreis
Burgenlandkreis
district, in southern Saxony-Anhalt, Germany
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Crypto-Calvinism
Crypto- Calvinism
Calvinism
is a pejorative term describing a segment of German members of the Lutheran Church
Lutheran Church
accused of secretly subscribing to Calvinist
Calvinist
doctrine of the Eucharist
Eucharist
in the decades immediately after the death of Martin Luther
Martin Luther
in 1546. It denotes what was seen as a hidden (crypto- from Greek: κρύπτω meaning "to hide, conceal, to be hid")[1] Calvinist
Calvinist
belief, i.e., the doctrines of John Calvin, by members of the Lutheran Church. The term crypto- Calvinist
Calvinist
in Lutheranism
Lutheranism
was preceded by terms Zwinglian
Zwinglian
and Sacramentarian
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Torture
Torture
Torture
(from the Latin tortus, "twisted") is the act of deliberately inflicting physical or psychological pain in order to fulfill some desire of the torturer or compel some action from the victim. Torture, by definition, is a knowing and intentional act; deeds which unknowingly or negligently inflict pain without a specific intent to do so are not typically considered torture. Torture
Torture
has been carried out or sanctioned by individuals, groups, and states throughout history from ancient times to modern day, and forms of torture can vary greatly in duration from only a few minutes to several days or longer
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Crop
A crop is a plant or animal product that can be grown and harvested extensively for profit or subsistence.[1] Crop
Crop
may refer either to the harvested parts or to the harvest in a more refined state (husked, shelled, etc.). Most crops are cultivated in agriculture or aquaculture. A crop is usually expanded to include macroscopic fungus (e.g. mushrooms), or alga (algaculture). Most crops are harvested as food for humans or livestock (fodder crops). Some crops are gathered from the wild (including intensive gathering, e.g. ginseng). Important non-food crops include horticulture, floriculture and industrial crops. Horticulture
Horticulture
crops include plants used for other crops (e.g. fruit trees). Floriculture
Floriculture
crops include bedding plants, houseplants, flowering garden and pot plants, cut cultivated greens, and cut flowers
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Herbal Remedies
Herbalism
Herbalism
(also herbal medicine or phytotherapy) is the study of botany and use of plants intended for medicinal purposes or for supplementing a diet. Plants have been the basis for medical treatments through much of human history, and such traditional medicine is still widely practiced today.[1] Modern medicine makes use of many plant-derived compounds as the basis for evidence-based pharmaceutical drugs. Although phytotherapy may apply modern standards of effectiveness testing to herbs and medicines derived from natural sources, few high-quality clinical trials and standards for purity or dosage exist
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Livestock
Livestock
Livestock
are domesticated animals raised in an agricultural setting to produce labor and commodities such as meat, eggs, milk, fur, leather, and wool. The term is sometimes used to refer solely to those that are bred for consumption, while other times it refers only to farmed ruminants, such as cattle and goats.[1] In recent years, some organizations have also raised livestock to promote the survival of rare breeds. The breeding, maintenance, and slaughter of these animals, known as animal husbandry, is a component of modern agriculture that has been practiced in many cultures since humanity's transition to farming from hunter-gatherer lifestyles. Animal
Animal
husbandry practices have varied widely across cultures and time periods. Originally, livestock were not confined by fences or enclosures, but these practices have largely shifted to intensive animal farming, sometimes referred to as "factory farming"
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