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Anne McCormick
Anne O'Hare McCormick
Anne O'Hare McCormick
(1880 – 29 May 1954) was a foreign news correspondent for the New York Times, in an era where the field was almost exclusively "a man's world". In 1937, she won the Pulitzer Prize for correspondence, becoming the first woman to receive a major category Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
in journalism. Born in Wakefield, Yorkshire, UK, in 1880,[1] she was educated in the United States
United States
at the College of Saint Mary of the Springs in Columbus, Ohio. After graduating she became an associate editor for the Catholic Universe Bulletin. Her 1911 marriage to Dayton businessman Francis J
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Ruth Crawford Seeger
Ruth Crawford Seeger
Ruth Crawford Seeger
(July 3, 1901 – November 18, 1953), born Ruth Porter Crawford, was an American modernist composer active primarily during the 1920s and 1930s and an American folk music specialist from the late 1930s until her death. She was a prominent member of a group of American composers known as the "ultramoderns," and her music influenced later composers including Elliott Carter
Elliott Carter
(Shreffler 1994).Contents1 Background (1901–1921) 2 Career (1921–1953)2.1 Chicago
Chicago
(1921–1929) 2.2 New York (1929–1936) 2.3 Washington (1936–1953)3 Family 4 Composition 5 Works5.1 Early 5.2 Middle 5.3 Late 5.4 Unknown date6 Notes 7 Sources 8 External linksBackground (1901–1921)[edit] Ruth Crawford was born in East Liverpool, Ohio, the second child of Clark Crawford, a Methodist minister, and Clara Graves Crawford
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Stanisława Walasiewicz
Stanisława Walasiewicz, also known as Stefania Walasiewicz,[2] Stanisława Walasiewiczówna (see Polish name) and Stella Walsh (3 April 1911 – 4 December 1980) was a Polish track and field athlete, who became a women's Olympic champion in the 100 metres. Upon her death, it was discovered that Walasiewicz had a Y chromosome
Y chromosome
and was intersex.[3] She became an American citizen in 1947.Contents1 Background 2 Athletic career 3 Post-athletic career 4 Death and controversy 5 Legacy 6 Records 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksBackground[edit] Walasiewicz was born on 3 April 1911 in Wierzchownia (now Brodnica County), Congress Poland.[4] Her family emigrated to the United States when she was three months old
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Elizabeth M. Boyer
Dr. Elizabeth M. "Betty" Boyer (November 12, 1913 in Ohio – December 2, 2002) was a brilliant and influential American lawyer, feminist and writer. In 1937, she earned a B.S. in education from Bowling Green State University. In 1947, she received her law degree from Cleveland–Marshall College of Law. In 1950, she earned her Masters of Law degree from Case Western Reserve University School of Law. She was a full professor of business law at Cuyahoga Community College. In 1968, she founded the Women's Equity Action League (WEAL) as a moderate feminist movement for professional women.[1] It provided dissent against the pro-choice stance of the National Organization for Women (NOW).[2] Amongst other issues, WEAL worked to abolish university quotas and discrimination against women
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Gertrude Donahey
Gertrude Walton Donahey (August 4, 1908 – July 11, 2004) was an American politician of the Democratic party who served as Ohio State Treasurer from 1971 to 1983. Biography[edit] Donahey was born in Goshen Township, Tuscarawas County, Ohio. She earned her bachelor’s at Mann’s Business College in Columbus, Ohio and went to work at the Office of the Ohio Adjutant General's Business and Finance Division.[1] She was married to John W. Donahey, who served for a time as Lieutenant Governor of Ohio. Her father-in-law, A. Victor Donahey, was a Governor of Ohio and a member of the United States Senate.[1] She was chosen as a delegate to the Democratic National Conventions in 1964 and 1968 and represented Ohio on the Party’s platform and resolution committee. She was hired in 1964 by U.S
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Jane Edna Hunter
Jane Edna Hunter (December 13, 1882 – January 13, 1971), an African-American social worker, was born near Pendleton, South Carolina. In 1911 she established the Working Girls Association in Cleveland, Ohio, which later became the Phillis Wheatley Association of Cleveland.[1][2][3][4]Contents1 Life 2 Legacy 3 References 4 Further readingLife[edit] Her parents were wage earners on the Woodburn Plantation Farm. After her father died in 1892, she did housework for local families. She began school at the age of 14, attending the Ferguson and Williams Academy in Abbeville, South Carolina. She graduated with an eighth-grade education in 1900. She returned to work as a domestic.[2][4][5][6][7] She was briefly married to Edward Hunter, who was about 40 years her senior. She moved to Charleston, South Carolina
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Consolata Kline
Sister Consolata M. Kline (October 8, 1916 – November 7, 2016)[1] was a religious sister of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and the Executive Director of the St. Elizabeth Hospital Medical Center.[2] Career[edit] Consolata Kline was born in Cleveland, Ohio on October 8, 1916, where she graduated from Lincoln High School in 1935. She entered the Sisters of Humility of Mary in 1943 after working through the Great Depression. She made her first profession of vows in July 1945 and her perpetual vows in 1948.[3][4] Kline attended St. Louis University where she received her bachelor of science in commerce and her masters in hospital administration.[2][3] She was hired at the St
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Margaret Mahoney
Margaret Field
Margaret Field
(née Morlan;[2][3] May 10, 1922 – November 6, 2011) was an American film actress[4] usually billed as Maggie Mahoney. The mother of actress Sally Field,[3] she was best known for her work in two science fiction films, The Man from Planet X (1951) and Captive Women (1952).[5]Contents1 Early years 2 Career 3 Personal life 4 Death 5 Selected filmography 6 References 7 External linksEarly years[edit] Field was born in Houston, Texas,[5] the daughter of Joy Beatrice (née Bickeley) and Wallace Miller Morlan.[6] Late in the 1930s she and her family moved to Pasadena, California.[7] Career[edit] Field was discovered at the Pasadena Playhouse[8] by talent scout Milton Lewis for Paramount Pictures. Following a successful screen test, she was offered an 18-month contract
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Helen Grace McClelland
Helen may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places 3 Arts, entertainment, and media 4 Storms 5 Other uses 6 See alsoPeople[edit] Helen of Troy, in Greek mythology, the most beautiful woman in the world Helen (actress)
Helen (actress)
(born 1938), Indian actress
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Rose Papier
Rose Papier
Rose Papier
(November 29, 1912—August 9, 2000) was an Ohio social administrator who worked in several departments throughout the state including the Department of Mental Health and Retardation, the Ohio Commission on Aging and headed the Ohio Administration on Aging when it was created in 1965. She was one of the inaugural inductees into the Ohio Women's Hall of Fame
Ohio Women's Hall of Fame
in 1978.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 References3.1 Citations 3.2 BibliographyEarly life[edit] Rose Locumovitz[1] was born on November 29, 1912 in St. Marys, Ohio[2] to Harry and Maisha Locumovitz, who had immigrated to the country from Russia. Soon thereafter, they shortened the surname to Locum and moved to Wapakoneta, Ohio. They were Jewish and her father peddled goods from a pushcart to support his eight children. After graduating from high school Locum worked as a model for fur coats in Cleveland
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Lottie Randolph
Lottie Randolph (died 1968) was a prominent agriculturist in the State of Ohio.[1] She was born in Rushville, Ohio. In 1931, she received her master farm homemaker degree from Ohio
Ohio
State University. In 1936, her husband Frank M. Randolph, a farmer, died.[2] Randolph was the assistant director of the Department of Agriculture in Ohio
Ohio
from 1939 to 1944 and 1947 to 1948, under two Governors
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Ella P. Stewart
Ella Nora Phillips Stewart (March 6, 1893 – November 27, 1987) was one of the first African-American female pharmacists in the United States.[1][2]Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Civic activities 4 Legacy 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Stewart was born Ella Nora Phillips, in Stringtown, a small village near Berryville, in Clark County, Virginia, the oldest of the four children of Henry H. Philips and Eliza T
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Marigene Valiquette
Marigene Gertrude Valiquette (born 1924) is a former member of the Ohio General Assembly.[1] She served 24 consecutive years in the state legislature, first as a member of the Ohio House of Representatives, beginning in 1963, and subsequently as a member of the Ohio State Senate, from 1969 until 1986.[2] For most of her 18 years as a state senator Valiquette was the only female senator in office.[1][2] She became chair of the Judiciary Committee in 1971; later she chaired the Ethics Committee.[2] During a period in the 1980s when the Democratic Party was in the majority, she was a ranking member on both the Finance and the Rules Committee.[2] In the early 1970s, as a state senator, Valiquette advocated strongly for Ohio's passage of the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA),[2][3] the proposed amendment to the United States Constitution that aimed to guarantee equal rights for women; in February 1974 Ohio became the 33rd state to ratify the ERA.[3] References[edit]^ a b "Ohio Women's Hal
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Mary Jobe Akeley
Mary Jobe Akeley
Mary Jobe Akeley
(29 January, 1878 – 19 July, 1966) was an American explorer and naturalist, famous as one of the earliest woman explorers in Africa where she and her husband hunted and photographed animals during their natural history studies. She is the author of Carl Akeley's Africa, published in 1929, Lions, Gorillas and Their Neighbors, published in 1932 and Congo Eden published in 1950. Mount Jobe in Canada was renamed in her honor to acknowledge her exploration efforts in the Rocky Mountains.[2]Contents1 Childhood and education 2 Explorations in Canada 3 Camp Mystic & the Peace River Sanctuary 4 Travels in Africa and Marriage 5 Awards and recognition 6 Bibliography 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksChildhood and education[edit] Mary Lenore Jobe Akeley was born to Richard Watson and Sarah Jane Pittis Jobe on 29 January 1878.[1] She grew up on her parents' farm in Tappan, Ohio and graduated from Scio College, Ohio
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Helen Chatfield Black
Helen Black is a leading naturalist and conservationist in the Greater Cincinnati area. Biography[edit] Black was one of the founders of the Cincinnati Nature Center (CNC) in 1965 and Little Miami Inc.[1][2] She served as vice president of the CNC from 1967 to 1977. Black was president of the Ohio chapter of The Nature Conservancy from 1976 to 1978 and board member of the Ohio Environmental Council.[3] In 1972, the Garden Club of America awarded Black the Medal of Merit for Conservation. In 1973, she was awarded the oak Leaf Award from The Nature Conservancy as well as the Ohio Department of Natural Resources Conservation Award. She was inducted into the Ohio Women's Hall of Fame in 1978.[3] She was nominated along with her husband, Robert L. Black Jr., in 1997 for the Jacob E
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Mary Ann Bickerdyke
Mary
Mary
may refer to: Mary
Mary
(name), a female given nameContents1 People1.1 Religious contexts 1.2 Royalty2 Geography 3 Books 4 Film and television 5 Music5.1 Albums 5.2 Songs6 Ships and boats 7 Other uses 8 See alsoPeople This section lists people commonly referred to
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