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Anne Cobden-Sanderson
Anne Cobden-Sanderson
Anne Cobden-Sanderson
or Julia Sarah Anne Cobden (26 March 1853 – 2 November 1926) was a British socialist and suffragette. Life[edit] Cobden was born in London
London
in 1853 to Catherine Anne and the radical politician Richard Cobden. After her father died, she was educated at schools in Britain and Germany. She lived for a time at the home of George MacDonald
George MacDonald
and later at the home of William Morris. In 1882 she married the out-of-work barrister T. J. Sanderson, and they both took the surname Cobden-Sanderson.[1] Anne was concerned that her husband was thinking rather than doing, and she suggested that he take up book-binding. They were already in the social circle of William Morris
William Morris
and Jane Burdon, and it was her husband who first coined the term "Arts and Crafts"
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Independent Labour Party
The Independent Labour Party
Independent Labour Party
(ILP) was a British political party of the left, established in 1893, when the Liberals appeared reluctant to endorse working-class candidates, representing the interests of the majority. A sitting independent MP and prominent union organiser, Keir Hardie, became its first chairman. The word ‘Labour’ was chosen for the title, rather than ‘Socialist’, which at that time was almost synonymous with ‘Marxist’.[citation needed] Still it was positioned to the left of Ramsay MacDonald’s Labour Representation Committee, founded in 1900 and soon renamed the Labour Party, with whom it was affiliated from 1906-1932
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names
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Harriet Stanton Blatch
Harriot Eaton Stanton Blatch (January 20, 1856 – November 20, 1940) was a U.S. writer, suffragist, and the daughter of pioneering women's rights activist Elizabeth Cady Stanton.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Suffrage campaigns 3 War and postwar 4 Last years and death 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] Harriot Eaton Stanton was born, the sixth of eight children, in Seneca Falls, New York, to social activists Henry Brewster Stanton and Elizabeth Cady Stanton. She attended Vassar College, where she graduated with a degree in mathematics in 1878. She attended the Boston School for Oratory for a year, and then spent most of 1880-81 in Germany as a tutor for young girls.[1] On her return voyage to the United States, she met English businessman William Henry Blatch, Jr., known as "Harry Blatch"
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Women's Freedom League
The Women's Freedom League
Women's Freedom League
was an organisation in the United Kingdom which campaigned for women's suffrage and sexual equality.Contents1 History 2 The Vote and the Growth in the Women's Freedom League 3 Protests and events 4 Archives 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The group was founded in 1907 by seventy members of the Women's Social and Political Union (WSPU) including Teresa Billington-Greig, Charlotte Despard, Alice Schofield, Edith How-Martyn
Edith How-Martyn
and Margaret Nevinson
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George Bernard Shaw
George Bernard Shaw
George Bernard Shaw
(26 July 1856 – 2 November 1950), known at his insistence simply as Bernard Shaw, was an Irish playwright, critic, polemicist, and political activist. His influence on Western theatre, culture and politics extended from the 1880s to his death and beyond. He wrote more than sixty plays, including major works such as Man and Superman
Man and Superman
(1902), Pygmalion (1912) and Saint Joan (1923). With a range incorporating both contemporary satire and historical allegory, Shaw became the leading dramatist of his generation, and in 1925 was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature. Born in Dublin, Shaw moved to London in 1876, where he struggled to establish himself as a writer and novelist, and embarked on a rigorous process of self-education. By the mid-1880s he had become a respected theatre and music critic
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Nellie Martel
Ellen Alma "Nellie" Martel, née Charleston (30 September 1855 – 11 August 1940) was an English-Australian suffragist and elocutionist.[1]Contents1 Life 2 Election 3 Return to England 4 ReferencesLife[edit] Born at Beacon in Cornwall
Cornwall
to hammer-man John Charleston and Elizabeth, née Williams (one of her siblings was future Australian Senator David Charleston), she migrated to Australia in 1879, arriving in Sydney
Sydney
in January 1880. She married a Guernsey
Guernsey
widower, photographer Charles Martel, at Christ Church Cathedral in Newcastle on 4 April 1885; the couple returned to Britain in 1889
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Minnie Baldock
(Lucy) Minnie Baldock (c. 1864 – 1954)[1] was a British suffragette.[2] Along with Annie Kenney, she co-founded the first branch in London of the Women's Social and Political Union.[2] Life[edit] Lucy Minnie Rogers was born in Bromley-By-Bow in 1864. She worked in sweated labour and married in 1888. The East End of London was known for its poor conditions and the Baldocks joined the Independent Labour Party (ILP) after the socialist Keir Hardie became their member of parliament in 1892.[3] She worked with Charlotte Despard and Dora Montefiore.[4] She took charge of the local unemployment Fund that was used to mitigate extreme hardship.[3] Women were not then allowed to be a member of parliament, but the ILP chose her as their candidate to sit on the West Ham Board of Guardians in 1905.[4] Baldock and Annie Kenney formed the first London branch (in Canning Town) of the then Manchester based Women's Social and Political Union in 1906.[2] Baldock became a paid employee of the WSPU
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River Thames
The River Thames
River Thames
(/tɛmz/ ( listen) TEMZ) is a river that flows through southern England, most notably through London. At 215 miles (346 km), it is the longest river entirely in England
England
and the second longest in the United Kingdom, after the River Severn. It also flows through Oxford
Oxford
(where it is called Isis), Reading, Henley-on-Thames
Henley-on-Thames
and Windsor. The lower reaches of the river are called the Tideway, derived from its long tidal reach up to Teddington Lock. It rises at Thames Head
Thames Head
in Gloucestershire, and flows into the North Sea
North Sea
via the Thames Estuary
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Hammersmith
Hammersmith
Hammersmith
is a district of west London, England, located 4.3 miles (6.9 km) west-southwest of Charing Cross. It is the administrative centre of the London
London
Borough of Hammersmith
Hammersmith
and Fulham, and identified in the London
London
Plan as one of 35 major centres in Greater London. It is bordered by Shepherd's Bush
Shepherd's Bush
to the north, Kensington
Kensington
to the east, Chiswick
Chiswick
to the west, and Fulham
Fulham
to the south, with which it forms part of the north bank of the River Thames. It is linked by Hammersmith Bridge
Hammersmith Bridge
to Barnes in the southwest. The area is one of west London's key commercial and employment centres, and has for some decades been a major centre of London's Polish community
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Arts And Crafts Movement
The Arts and Crafts movement
Arts and Crafts movement
was an international movement in the decorative and fine arts that began in Britain and flourished in Europe and North America between about 1880 and 1920, emerging in Japan (the Mingei
Mingei
movement) in the 1920s. It stood for traditional craftsmanship using simple forms, and often used medieval, romantic, or folk styles of decoration. It advocated economic and social reform and was essentially anti-industrial.[1][2][3] It had a strong influence on the arts in Europe until it was displaced by Modernism
Modernism
in the 1930s,[4] and its influence continued among craft makers, designers, and town planners long afterwards.[5] The term was first used by T. J. Cobden-Sanderson
T. J

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Kelmscott Press
William Morris
William Morris
(24 March 1834 – 3 October 1896) was an English textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, and socialist activist. Associated with the British Arts and Crafts Movement, he was a major contributor to the revival of traditional British textile arts and methods of production. His literary contributions helped to establish the modern fantasy genre, while he played a significant role in propagating the early socialist movement in Britain. Born in Walthamstow, Essex, to a wealthy middle-class family, Morris came under the strong influence of medievalism while studying Classics at Oxford University, there joining the Birmingham
Birmingham
Set
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William Morris
William Morris
William Morris
(24 March 1834 – 3 October 1896) was an English textile designer, poet, novelist, translator, and socialist activist. Associated with the British Arts and Crafts Movement, he was a major contributor to the revival of traditional British textile arts and methods of production. His literary contributions helped to establish the modern fantasy genre, while he played a significant role in propagating the early socialist movement in Britain. Born in Walthamstow, Essex, to a wealthy middle-class family, Morris came under the strong influence of medievalism while studying Classics at Oxford University, there joining the Birmingham
Birmingham
Set
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George MacDonald
George MacDonald
George MacDonald
(10 December 1824 – 18 September 1905) was a Scottish author, poet and Christian minister. He was a pioneering figure in the field of fantasy literature and the mentor of fellow writer Lewis Carroll. His writings have been cited as a major literary influence by many notable authors, including W. H. Auden, C. S. Lewis, J. R. R. Tolkien,[1] Walter de la Mare,[2] E. Nesbit
E. Nesbit
and Madeleine L'Engle.[1] C. S. Lewis
C. S. Lewis
wrote that he regarded MacDonald as his "master": "Picking up a copy of Phantastes one day at a train-station bookstall, I began to read. A few hours later", said Lewis, "I knew that I had crossed a great frontier." G. K. Chesterton
G. K

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