HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff

Annales Ecclesiastici IV
Annales or annals are a concise form of historical writing which record events chronologically, year by year.List of Works with titles containing the word "Annales"[edit] Annales (Ennius), an epic poem by Quintus Ennius
Quintus Ennius
covering Roman history from the fall of Troy down to the censorship of Cato the Elder Annals
Annals
(Tacitus) Ab excessu divi Augusti "Following the death of the divine Augustus" Annales Alamannici, ed. W. Lendi, Untersuchungen zur frühalemannischen Annalistik. Die Murbacher Annalen,mit Edition (Freiburg, 1971) Annales Bertiniani, eds. F. Grat, J. Vielliard, S. Clemencet and L. Levillain, Annales de Saint-Bertin (Paris, 1964) Annales du Muséum national d'histoire naturelle, Paris, France. Published 1802 to 1813, then became the Mémoires then the Nouvelles Annales Annales Fuldenses, ed. F
[...More...]

picture info

Annals
Annals
Annals
(Latin: annāles, from annus, "year")[1][2] are a concise historical record in which events are arranged chronologically, year by year,[1] although the term is also used loosely for any historical record.[2]Contents1 Scope 2 History2.1 Ancient 2.2 Medieval 2.3 Modern3 See also 4 Notes 5 More Notes 6 References 7 External linksScope[edit] The nature of the distinction between annals and history is a subject that has received more attention from critics than its intrinsic importance deserves, based on divisions established by the ancient Romans.[1]
[...More...]

Annales Iuvavenses
The Annales iuvavenses or Annals
Annals
of Salzburg
Salzburg
were a series of annals written in the 9th and 10th centuries at Salzburg
Salzburg
(the former Roman Iuvavum) in the East Frankish stem duchy of Bavaria. They are a useful source for southeastern Germany
Germany
and Austria
Austria
where they exist, but they only survive in fragments copied at the scriptorium of Admont Abbey
Admont Abbey
in the 12th century.[1] According to the Annales Iuvavenses, in 920 Baiuarii sponte se reddiderunt Arnolfo duci et regnare eum fecerunt in regno Teutonicorum: "the Bavarians, with some other East Franks, elected Arnulf German king in opposition to Henry" (actually in 919)
[...More...]

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
[...More...]

Annales D'histoire économique Et Sociale
Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales is a French academic journal covering social history that was established in 1929 by Marc Bloch
Marc Bloch
and Lucien Febvre. The journal gave rise to an approach to history known as the Annales School. The journal began in Strasbourg as Annales d'histoire économique et sociale; it moved to Paris and kept the same name from 1929 to 1939. It was successively renamed Annales d'histoire sociale (1939–1942, 1945), Mélanges d’histoire sociale (1942–1944), Annales. Economies, sociétés, civilisations (1946–1994), and, finally, Annales
[...More...]

Annales School
The Annales school (French pronunciation: ​[a'nal]) is a group of historians associated with a style of historiography developed by French historians in the 20th century to stress long-term social history. It is named after its scholarly journal Annales d'histoire économique et sociale, which remains the main source of scholarship, along with many books and monographs.[1] The school has been highly influential in setting the agenda for historiography in France and numerous other countries, especially regarding the use of social scientific methods by historians, emphasizing social rather than political or diplomatic themes, and for being generally hostile to the class analysis of Marxist historiography. The school deals primarily with late medieval and early modern Europe (before the French Revolution), with little interest in later topics. It has dominated French social history and influenced historiography in Europe and Latin America
[...More...]

Granius Licinianus
Granius Licinianus (active in the 2nd century AD) was a Roman author of historical and encyclopedic works that survive only in fragments. He most likely lived at the time of Hadrian.[1]Contents1 History 2 Editions 3 Commentary 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Granius compiled a "novel"[2] narrative epitome of Roman history, drawing mainly on Livy
Livy
and Sallust, that ran to at least 36 books, "keen on ane
[...More...]

picture info

Annales Xantenses
The Annales Xantenses
Annales Xantenses
or Annals
Annals
of Xanten are a series of annals written, probably at Lorsch
Lorsch
for the period 832 to 852 and at Cologne for the period until 873. The Lorsch
Lorsch
author is probably Gerward, a royal chaplain, but the continuator is unknown. For that period (832–873) they present an independent source to augment the other Reichsannalen. Sources[edit]Medieval Sourcebook: Annals
Annals
of Xanten, 845-853. Reuter, Timothy (trans.) The Annals
Annals
of Fulda
[...More...]

Annales Vedastini
The Annales Vedastini or Annals
Annals
of St-Vaast are a series of annals written in the early tenth century at the Abbey of St. Vaast
Abbey of St. Vaast
in Arras. They are an important source for the ninth century. The years from 874 to 900 are covered with a strong bias for Lotharingian and West Frankish affairs. Like the Annales Fuldenses
Annales Fuldenses
and Annales Bertiniani, the AV, as it is often abbreviated, was combined with the other Reichsannalen in the so-called Chronicon Vedastinum, a general chronicle covering the history of the Carolingian Empire
Carolingian Empire
up until 899. See also[edit]ReichsannalenReferences[edit] Reuter, Timothy (trans.) The Annals
Annals
of Fulda
[...More...]

picture info

Annales Regni Francorum
The Royal Frankish Annals
Annals
(Latin: Annales regni Francorum; also Annales Laurissenses maiores and German: Reichsannalen) are Latin annals composed in Carolingian Francia, recording year-by-year the state of the monarchy from 741 (the death of Mayor of the Palace Charles Martel) to 829 (the beginning of the crisis of Louis the Pious)
[...More...]

picture info

Annales (Ennius)
Annales is the name of a highly fragmentary Latin
Latin
epic poem written by the Roman poet Ennius
Ennius
in the 2nd century BC. Although only snippets of the work survive in the present day, the poem's influence on Latin literature was significant.Contents1 Contents1.1 Sources2 Style 3 Remains 4 Reception 5 References 6 BibliographyContents[edit] Ennius's Annales—which was the first epic poem that covered the early history of the Roman state—was originally published in fifteen books, although Ennius
Ennius
later amended it with the addition of three others.[1][2] Fragments of the Annales, as well as ancient testimonia, suggest that Ennius
Ennius
opened his epic with a recollection of a dream
[...More...]

Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales
Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales is a French academic journal covering social history that was established in 1929 by Marc Bloch
Marc Bloch
and Lucien Febvre. The journal gave rise to an approach to history known as the Annales School. The journal began in Strasbourg as Annales d'histoire économique et sociale; it moved to Paris and kept the same name from 1929 to 1939. It was successively renamed Annales d'histoire sociale (1939–1942, 1945), Mélanges d’histoire sociale (1942–1944), Annales. Economies, sociétés, civilisations (1946–1994), and, finally, Annales
[...More...]

picture info

Annales Fuldenses
The Annales Fuldenses
Annales Fuldenses
or Annals of Fulda are East Frankish chronicles that cover independently the period from the last years of Louis the Pious (died 840) to shortly after the end of effective Carolingian rule in East Francia
East Francia
with the accession of the child-king, Louis III, in 900. Throughout this period they are a near contemporary record of the events they describe and a primary source for Carolingian historiography. They are usually read as a counterpart to the narrative found in the West Frankish Annales Bertiniani.Contents1 Authorship and manuscripts 2 Sources 3 Content 4 Importance 5 See also 6 ReferencesAuthorship and manuscripts[edit] The Annals were composed at the Abbey of Fulda
Abbey of Fulda
in Hesse
[...More...]

picture info

Muséum National D'Histoire Naturelle
The French National Museum of Natural History, known in French as the Muséum national d'histoire naturelle
Muséum national d'histoire naturelle
(abbreviation MNHN), is the national natural history museum of France
France
and a grand établissement of higher education part of Sorbonne
Sorbonne
Universities. The main museum is located in Paris, France, on the left bank of the River Seine. It was founded in 1793 during the French Revolution, but was established earlier in 1635
[...More...]

Annales Bertiniani
Annales Bertiniani (or Annals
Annals
of Saint Bertin) are late Carolingian, Frankish annals that were found in the Abbey of Saint Bertin, Saint-Omer, France, after which they are named. Their account is taken to cover the period 830-82, thus continuing the Royal Frankish Annals (741–829), from which, however, it has circulated independently in only one manuscript. They are available in the Monumenta Germaniæ Historica (Waitz 1883) and in a later French edition taking into account a newly discovered manuscript (Grat 1964). The Annals
Annals
of St. Bertin are one of the principal sources of ninth-century Francia, and are particularly well-informed on events in the West Frankish sphere of Charles the Bald
[...More...]

picture info

Annales Alamannici
The Annales Almannici, which are also referred to as the Annals of St. Gall, provide one of the earliest records of Medieval Europe available.[1] They are notable for their short, cursory style and limited narrative. To the modern scholar, they might appear to be incomplete, and for that reason, of limited value. However, in recent years, historians such as Hayden White have argued that the style of the chronicles depict a worldview that is distinctly medieval where "things happen to people rather than one in which people do things." For that reason, they provide insight into the medieval mind and what things the people of the Dark Ages considered important.[2] The core text of the Annales Alamannici
Annales Alamannici
covers the years 709 through to 799. Spread over several Swabian monasteries, the annals were continued independently in several places, in the Reichenau Abbey up to 939 (continued by Hermannus Contractus), in St. Gallen
St

[...More...]

.