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Ankober
Ankober, formerly known as Ankobar,[1] is a town in central Ethiopia. Located in the Semien Shewa
Shewa
Zone of the Amhara Region, Ankober
Ankober
is perched on the eastern escarpment of the Ethiopian Highlands
Ethiopian Highlands
at an elevation of about 2,465 meters (8,100 ft). It is 40 kilometers (25 mi) to the east of Debre Birhan
Debre Birhan
and about 90 miles (140 km) northeast of Addis Ababa. Ankober
Ankober
was formerly the capital of the Ethiopian kingdom of Shewa. Buildings that survive from the Shewa
Shewa
period include the Kidus Mikael church, built by Sahle Selassie
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Abichu Oromo
Abbichu Oromo are one of the Tulema sub clans who live in Semen Shewa zone in Ethiopia. In 1841 William Harris mentioned them as allies of King Sahle Silassie of Shewa. The prominent settlements and towns are Lami, Mendida, Jiru, Robe, Deneba, Enewari and Chacha. History[edit] The commander in chief of his army, Ayto Mirach, was from this clan. At that time they inhabited the land north of Galan tribe, South of Menz, west of Karayyu and east of Marhabiete. They became Christian in the 1830s, thus connecting the two Amhara dominions. The capital city of the tribe was Angolala. This tribe of Oromo were Amharic speakers and their territory joined the Amhara region.This Ethiopia-related article is a stub
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Afar People
The Afar (Afar: Qafár), also known as the Danakil, Adali and Odali, are an ethnic group inhabiting the Horn of Africa. They primarily live in the Afar Region
Afar Region
of Ethiopia
Ethiopia
and in northern Djibouti, although some also inhabit the southern point of Eritrea
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Ethiopian News Agency
The Ethiopian News Agency (ENA) is the official news agency of the Government of Ethiopia. It is the oldest news organization in Ethiopia. External links[edit]Official websiteThis article about mass media in Ethiopia
Ethiopia
is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article about government in Ethiopia
Ethiopia
is a stub
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Greeks In Ethiopia
The Greek community in Ethiopia today numbers about 500 persons and can be traced back to ancient times. It is mainly located in the capital, Addis Ababa, and the city of Dire Dawa.Contents1 History 2 Present Situation 3 References 4 Further reading 5 External linksHistory[edit] The name Ethiopia itself is Greek and means "of burned face".[1] It is first attested in the Homeric epics but it is unlikely to have referred to any particular nation, but rather, to people of African descent in general
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William Cornwallis Harris
Major Sir William Cornwallis Harris
William Cornwallis Harris
(baptised 2 April 1807 – died 9 October 1848) was an English military engineer, artist and hunter.[1]Contents1 Life and career1.1 Early life 1.2 South Africa 1.3 Return to India 1.4 Mission to Ethiopia 1.5 Last years 1.6 Personal life2 Books 3 See also 4 Sources 5 References 6 External linksLife and career[edit] Early life[edit] The son of James Harris of Wittersham, Kent, he entered Addiscombe Military Seminary at the age of fourteen. Two years later, in December 1823, he joined the army of the East India Company as second lieutenant in Engineers, Bombay Establishment. Over the following thirteen years, he was posted to several places in India and was able to pursue his taste for field sports and the depiction of wildlife
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Ethiopia
Coordinates: 8°N 38°E / 8°N 38°E / 8; 38Federal Democratic Republic
Republic
of Ethiopia የኢትዮጵያ ፌዴራላዊ ዴሞክራሲያዊ ሪፐብሊክ yeʾĪtiyoṗṗya Fēdēralawī Dēmokirasīyawī RīpebilīkFlagEmblemAnthem:  ወደፊት ገስግሺ፣ ውድ እናት ኢትዮጵያ March Forward, Dear Mother EthiopiaCapital and largest city Addis Ababa 9°1′N 38°45′E / 9.017°N 38.750°E / 9.017; 38.750Official languages
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Tewodros II Of Ethiopia
Téwodros II (Ge'ez: ቴዎድሮስ, baptized as Sahle Dingil, and often referred to in English by the equivalent Theodore II) (c. 1818 – April 13, 1868) was the Emperor of Ethiopia
Emperor of Ethiopia
from 1855 until his death. He was born Kassa Haile Giorgis, but was more regularly referred to as Kassa Hailu (Ge'ez: ካሳ ኃይሉ — meaning "restitution" and "His [or the] power"). His rule is often placed as the beginning of modern Ethiopia, ending the decentralized Zemene Mesafint
Zemene Mesafint
(Era of the Princes). Tewodros II's origins were in the Era of the Princes, but his ambitions were not those of the regional nobility. He sought to reestablish a cohesive Ethiopian state and to reform its administration and church. He did not initially claim Solomonic lineage but did seek to restore Solomonic hegemony, and he considered himself the Elect of God
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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Yohannes IV Of Ethiopia
Yohannes IV (Ge'ez: ፬ኛ ዮሓንስ, Āratenya Yōḥānnis; horse name "Abba Bezba"; 11 July 1837 – 10 March 1889),[1] born Lij Kaśa Mercha and contemporaneously also known in English as Johannes or John IV, was ruler of Tigray 1867-71, and Emperor of Ethiopia ("King of Zion" and "King of Kings" of Ethiopia [as shown in his seal]) 1872-89 is remembered as one of the leading architects of the modern state of Ethiopia.[2] Contents1 Origin and rise of Power 2 Internal policy2.1 Religious policy3 Foreign policy3.1 War with Ottoman Egypt 3.2 War with Sudan4 Death 5 Descendants5.1 Araya Selassie Yohannes 5.2 Mengesha Yohannes6 Legacy6.1 Full title7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksOrigin and rise of Power[edit] On the side of his father, Mercha Wolde Kidan, Yohannes descended from the ruling dynasty of Tembien where both his father and grandfather bore the traditional title of šum Tembien,
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Qedami Qal
Kidane Kale (reigned c. 1718 - c. 1744; literal meaning: "Beginning, Word"), better known as Abuye, was a Meridazmach of Shewa, an important Amhara noble of Ethiopia. He was the son of Sebestyanos.[1] Abir states that he ruled for 25 years, although noting that Harris claims he ruled for 15 years, Coulbeaux for 25 (from 1725 to 1750), and d'Hericourt for 60.[2] His wife was Woizero Tagunestiya, daughter of Mama Rufa'el, Governor of Mamameder. Abuye succeeded on the death of his father, and made his capital at Har Amba. Sebestyanos had died "by a curious accident", according to Levine. Abuye had been rebuilding some of the churches destroyed by Ahmad Gragn, one of which was in Doqaqit dedicated to St
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First World War
Allied victoryCentral Powers' victory on the Eastern Front nullified by defeat on the Western Front Fall of the German, Russian, Ottoman, and Austro-Hungarian empires Russian Civil War
Russian Civil War
and foundation of the Soviet Union Formation of new countries in Europe
Europe
and the Middle East Transfer of German colonies
German colonies
and regions of the former Ottoman Empire to other powers Establishment of the League of Nations
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Negus
Negus
Negus
(Ge'ez: ነጉሥ, nəgūś IPA: [nɨguːɬ]; Amharic: nigūs; cf. Tigrinya: ነጋሲ negus) is a royal title in the Ethiopian Semitic languages.[1] It denotes a monarch,[2] such as the Bahri Negus
Negus
(Lord of the Seas) of the Medri Bahri
Medri Bahri
kingdom in pre-1890 Eritrea, and the Negus
Negus
in pre-1974 Ethiopia. Overview[edit] Main article: Ethiopian aristocratic and court titles Negus
Negus
is a noun derived from the Ethiopian Semitic root ngś, meaning "to reign". The title has subsequently been used to translate the words "king" or "emperor" in Biblical and other literature
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Mikael Of Wollo
Michael
Michael
/ˈmaɪkəl/ is a masculine given name that comes from Hebrew: מִיכָאֵל / מיכאל‎ (Mīkhāʼēl, pronounced [miχaˈʔel]), derived from the question מי כאל mī kāʼēl, meaning "Who is like God?".[1] Patronymic surnames that come from Michael
Michael
include Carmichael, DiMichele, MacMichael, McMichael, Michaels, Micallef, Michaelson, Michels, Mihály, Mikeladze, Mikhaylov, Mikkelsen, Mitchell and Mykhaylenko.Contents1 Religion 2 Popularity 3 See also 4 ReferencesReligion[edit] The name first appears in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
in the Book of Numbers, 13:13 where Sethur the son of Michael
Michael
is one of 12 spies sent into the Land of Canaan. Michael
Michael
features in the Book of Daniel
Book of Daniel
12:1, as the archangel in romanization, and in the Islamic Quran
Quran
as Mikaeel
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Ras (title)
Until the end of the Ethiopian monarchy in 1974, there were two categories of nobility in Ethiopia. The Mesafint (Ge'ez: መሳፍንት masāfint, modern mesāfint, singular Ge'ez: መስፍን masfin, modern mesfin, "prince"), the hereditary nobility, formed the upper echelon of the ruling class. The Mekwanint (Ge'ez: መኳንንትmäkʷanin, modern mäkʷenin singular Ge'ez: መኳንንት mäkʷanin, modern mäkʷenin or Amharic: መኮንን mekonnen, "governor") were the appointed nobles, often of humble birth, who formed the bulk of the aristocracy. Until the 20th century, the most powerful people at court were generally members of the Mekwanint appointed by the monarch, while regionally, the Mesafint enjoyed greater influence and power
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Italian East Africa
Italian East Africa
Italian East Africa
(Italian: Africa Orientale Italiana) was an Italian colony in the Horn of Africa. It was formed in 1936 through the merger of Italian Somaliland, Italian Eritrea, and the newly conquered Ethiopian Empire
Ethiopian Empire
which became Italian Ethiopia.[3] During the Second World War, Italian East Africa
Italian East Africa
was occupied by a British-led force including colonial and Ethiopian units.[4] After the war, Italian Somaliland
Italian Somaliland
and Eritrea
Eritrea
came under British administration, while Ethiopia
Ethiopia
regained full independence
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