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Animation
Animation
Animation
is a dynamic medium in which images or objects are manipulated to appear as moving images. In traditional animation the images were drawn (or painted) by hand on cels to be photographed and exhibited on film. Nowadays most animations are made with computer-generated imagery (CGI). Computer animation
Computer animation
can be very detailed 3D animation, while 2D computer animation can be used for stylistic reasons, low bandwidth or faster real-time renderings. Other common animation methods apply a stop motion technique to two and three-dimensional objects like paper cutouts, puppets or clay figures. The stop motion technique where live actors are used as a frame-by-frame subject is known as pixilation. Commonly the effect of animation is achieved by a rapid succession of sequential images that minimally differ from each other
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Production Report
A production report ("PR") is a filmmaking term for the form filled out each day of production of a movie or television show to summarize what occurred that day. There is no standard template for a production report, and each show usually has an original template, often created before production begins by one of the assistant directors ("AD"). Besides superficial differences, most forms record the same information and are simply a series of blank tables created in Excel printed doublesided on a legal sized (8 x 14 inch) sheet of paper. The purpose of this form is to keep track of a production's progress and expenses and to help determine what salary is owed to the cast and crew
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Sync Sound
Sync sound (synchronized sound recording) refers to sound recorded at the time of the filming of movies. It has been widely used in movies since the birth of sound movies. [1]Contents1 History 2 Pioneering films 3 Sync sound in Asia 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Even in the silent film era, films were shown with sounds, often with musical accompaniment by a pianist or an orchestra keeping time with the screen action. The first synchronization was a turning recording device marked with a white spot. As the white spot rotated, the cameraman hand cranked the camera to keep it in sync with the recording. The method was then repeated for playback, but with the projectionist hand cranking the film projector
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Film Inventory Report
The Film
Film
Inventory Report or Daily Raw Stock Log is a filmmaking term for a report produced by the clapper loader each day
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Daily Call Sheet
The daily call sheet is a filmmaking term for the schedule crafted by the assistant director, using the director's shot list. It is issued to the cast and crew of a film production to inform them of where and when they should report for a particular day of filming.[1][2] The production schedule is listed by call time, the time when people are expected to start work on a film set. Information found on call sheets[edit] Call sheets include other useful information such as contact information (e.g. phone numbers of crew members and other contacts), the schedule for the day, which scenes and script pages are being shot, and the address of the shoot location. Call sheets have information about cast transportation arrangements, parking instructions and safety notes. Call sheets may also provide logistical information regarding the location
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Daily Production Report
A daily production report (DPR) or production report (PR) is a filmmaking term for the form filled out each day of production for a movie or television show to summarize what occurred that day. There is no standard template for a production report and each show usually has an original template, often created before production begins by one of the assistant directors. Besides superficial differences, most forms record the same information and are simply a series of blank tables created in Excel printed double-sided on a legal sized (8 x 14) sheet of paper. The purpose of this form is to keep track of a production's progress and expenses. It is finally sent to studio executives and is permanently filed to serve as a legal record. Front[edit] The very top lists the production company name, production title, director, producers, unit production managers, assistant directors, the total number of scheduled production days, and the current production day
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Daily Progress Report
A daily progress report is a filmmaking report that is produced at the end of each shooting day by the First Assistant Director (1AD) and passed to the Production Manager for approval. The daily progress report contains a record of what scenes were shot that day, the locations used, the number of meals served, the vehicles and equipment utilised and any other notable events or incidents. References[edit]Miller, Pat P. (1998). Script Supervising and Film
Film
Continuity. Focal Press. p. 107
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Sound Report
A sound report is a filmmaking term for a sheet of paper created by the Sound Mixer to record details of each file recorded during filming. A sound report is arranged in a table format, where the rows represent each file recorded, which at the least would contain columns for noting down the scene, slate or shot and take number, and a wider column for remarks about the particular take's sound. A report would typically note the title of the production, the date, the audio roll or tape that the file is recorded on, tape speed or sample rate, bit depth, and timecode information
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Cost Report
There are several different types of cost reports. One type of cost report is a filmmaking term for a weekly report, compiled by the Production Accountant, detailing the costs to date, costs this week and estimate of the costs to complete the film. Medicare cost reports must be completed yearly by facilities such as nursing homes, home health agencies, and hospices in order to remain compliant with CMS regulations.[1] They must be filed once a year, generally five months after the close of the facility's fiscal year.[2] There are many other types that are related to multiple fields of work.v t eFilmmakingDevelopment Film
Film
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Re-recording (filmmaking)
Re-recording is the process by which the audio track of a film or video production is created. As sound elements are mixed and combined together the process necessitates "re-recording" all of the audio elements, such as dialogue, music, sound effects, by the sound re-recording mixer(s) to achieve the desired end result, which is the final soundtrack that the audience hears when the finished film is played.This filmmaking article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis article needs additional or more specific categories
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Soundtrack
A soundtrack, also written sound track,[1] can be recorded music accompanying and synchronized to the images of a motion picture, book, television program or video game; a commercially released soundtrack album of music as featured in the soundtrack of a film, video or television presentation; or the physical area of a film that contains the synchronized recorded sound.Contents1 Origin of the term 2 Types of recordings2.1 Terminology 2.2 Film
Film
score albums 2.3 Composite film tracks included on record3 Movie and television soundtracks 4
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Videography
Videography
Videography
refers to the process of capturing moving images on electronic media (e.g., videotape, direct to disk recording, or solid state storage) and even streaming media. The term includes methods of video production and post-production. It was initially equivalent of cinematography (moving images recorded on film stock). The advent of digital video recording in the late 20th century blurred the distinction between videography and cinematography, as in both methods the intermittent mechanism became the same. Nowadays, any video work outside commercial motion picture production could be called videography.Contents1 Etymology 2 Uses 3 Videography
Videography
in social science 4 See also 5 References 6 Further readingEtymology[edit] The word combines "video" from Latin, meaning "I see" or "I apprehend", with the Greek terminal ending "graphy", meaning "to write"
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Film Score
A film score (also sometimes called background score, background music, film soundtrack, film music, or incidental music) is original music written specifically to accompany a film
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Filmography
A filmography is a list of films related by some criteria. For example, an actor's career filmography is the list of films he or she has appeared in; a director's comedy filmography is the list of comedy films directed by a particular director
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Sound Effect
Sound
Sound
effects (or audio effects) are artificially created or enhanced sounds, or sound processes used to emphasize artistic or other content of films, television shows, live performance, animation, video games, music, or other media. In motion picture and television production, a sound effect is a sound recorded and presented to make a specific storytelling or creative point without the use of dialogue or music. The term often refers to a process applied to a recording, without necessarily referring to the recording itself. In professional motion picture and television production, dialogue, music, and sound effects recordings are treated as separate elements
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Roadshow Theatrical Release
A roadshow theatrical release (known also as reserved seat engagement) was a term in the motion picture industry for a practice in which a film opened in a limited number of theaters in large cities like New York City, Los Angeles, Chicago
Chicago
and other major cities around the world for a specific period of time before the nationwide general release. Although variants of roadshow releases occasionally still exist, the practice mostly ended in the early 1970s. As far as is known, virtually all of the films given roadshow releases were subsequently distributed to regular movie theatres. This was called a general release, and was akin to the modern-day wide release of a film
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