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Anglo-Saxon Runes
Anglo-Saxon runes
Anglo-Saxon runes
are runes used by the early Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
as an alphabet in their writing. The characters are known collectively as the futhorc (or fuþorc), from the Old English
Old English
sound values of the first six runes. The futhorc was a development from the 24-character Elder Futhark. Since the futhorc runes are thought to have first been used in Frisia
Frisia
before the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain, they have also been called Anglo-Frisian runes.[1] They were likely used from the 5th century onward, recording Old English
Old English
and Old Frisian. After the 9th century, they were gradually supplanted in Anglo-Saxon England
England
by the Old English
Old English
Latin
Latin
alphabets introduced by Irish missionaries
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Anglo-Saxon Warfare
The period of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
Warfare spans the 5th Century AD to the 11th in England
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Replacement Character
Specials is a short Unicode
Unicode
block allocated at the very end of the Basic Multilingual Plane, at U+FFF0–FFFF. Of these 16 code points, five are assigned as of Unicode
Unicode
10.0:U+FFF9 INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION ANCHOR, marks start of annotated text U+FFFA INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION SEPARATOR, marks start of annotating character(s) U+FFFB INTERLINEAR ANNOTATION TERMINATOR, marks end of annotation block U+FFFC  OBJECT REPLACEMENT CHARACTER, placeholder in the text for another unspecified object, for example in a compound document. U+FFFD � REPLACEMENT CHARACTER used to replace an unknown, unrecognized or unrepresentable character U+FFFE <noncharacter-FFFE> not a character. U+FFFF <noncharacter-FFFF> not a character.FFFE and FFFF are not unassigned in the usual sense, but guaranteed not to be a Unicode
Unicode
character at all
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Burial In Early Anglo-Saxon England
Burial
Burial
in Early Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
refers to the grave and burial customs followed by the Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
between the mid 5th and 11th centuries CE in Early Mediaeval England. There was "an immense range of variation" of burial practice performed by the Anglo-Saxon peoples during this period,[1] with them making use of both cremation and inhumation. In most cases, the "two modes of burial were given to both wealthy and ordinary individuals", and in many cases were found alongside one another in the same cemetery.[1] Both of these forms of burial were typically accompanied by grave goods, which included food, jewellery and weaponry
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Saint Luke
Luke the Evangelist
Luke the Evangelist
(Latin: Lūcās, Ancient Greek: Λουκᾶς, Loukãs, Hebrew: לוקאס‎, Lūqās, Aramaic: לוקא‎, Lūqā’) is one of the Four Evangelists—the four traditionally ascribed authors of the canonical Gospels. The early church fathers ascribed to him authorship of both the Gospel according to Luke
Gospel according to Luke
and the book of the Acts of the Apostles, which would mean Luke contributed over a quarter of the text of the New Testament, more than any other author
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Writing
Writing
Writing
is a medium of human communication that represents language and emotion with signs and symbols. In most languages, writing is a complement to speech or spoken language. Writing
Writing
is not a language, but a tool used to make languages be read. Within a language system, writing relies on many of the same structures as speech, such as vocabulary, grammar, and semantics, with the added dependency of a system of signs or symbols. The result of writing is called text, and the recipient of text is called a reader. Motivations for writing include publication, storytelling, correspondence, record keeping and diary
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Frisia
Coordinates: 53°15′00″N 7°00′00″E / 53.25000°N 7.00000°E / 53.25000; 7.00000Frisia Frisia
Frisia
in Northwestern EuropeStateless nation FrisiansIndependence None*Area 13,482.73 km2 (5,205.71 sq mi)Population 2,655,391Germany: 877,092 Netherlands: 1,778,299Density 197/km2 (510/sq mi)Languages West Frisian North Frisian East Frisian Low Saxon (Friso-Saxon) Dutch (West Frisian Dutch, Stadsfries) German DanishMain religion ProtestantTime zone  • Summer CET (UTC+1) CEST (UTC+2)Internet TLD .frl* Integrated parts
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Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
England
was early medieval England, existing from the 5th to the 11th century from the end of Roman Britain
Roman Britain
until the Norman conquest in 1066. It consisted of various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until 927 when it was united as the Kingdom of England
Kingdom of England
by King Æthelstan (r. 927–939). It became part of the North Sea Empire
North Sea Empire
of Cnut the Great, a personal union between England, Denmark
Denmark
and Norway
Norway
in the 11th century. The Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
were the members of Germanic-speaking groups who migrated to the southern half of the island of Great Britain from continental Europe and their cultural descendants
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List Of Anglo-Saxon Monarchs And Kingdoms
The Heptarchy
Heptarchy
is a collective name applied to the seven petty kingdoms of Anglo-Saxon England
Anglo-Saxon England
from the Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain
Anglo-Saxon settlement of Britain
in 5th century
5th century
until their unification into the Kingdom of England
Kingdom of England
in the early 10th century. The term "Heptarchy" (from the Greek ἑπταρχία heptarchia, from ἑπτά hepta "seven", ἀρχή arche "reign, rule" and the suffix -ία -ia) alludes to the tradition that there were seven Anglo-Saxon kingdoms, usually enumerated as: East Anglia, Essex, Kent, Mercia, Northumbria, Sussex
Sussex
and Wessex
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Unicode
Unicode
Unicode
is a computing industry standard for the consistent encoding, representation, and handling of text expressed in most of the world's writing systems. The latest version contains a repertoire of 136,755 characters covering 139 modern and historic scripts, as well as multiple symbol sets
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Celtic Christianity
Celtic Christianity
Christianity
or Insular Christianity
Christianity
refers broadly to certain features of Christianity
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Cnut The Great
Cnut
Cnut
the Great[2] (Old Norse: Knútr inn ríki;[3] c. 995[4] – 12 November 1035), also known as Canute—whose father was Sweyn Forkbeard (which gave him the patronym Sweynsson, Old Norse: Sveinsson)—was King of Denmark, England
England
and Norway; together often referred to as the North Sea
North Sea
Empire. Yet after the deaths of his heirs within a decade of his own, and Norman conquest of England
England
in 1066, this legacy was lost
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Christianisation Of Anglo-Saxon England
The Christianisation of Anglo-Saxon England was a process spanning the 7th century. It was essentially the result of the Gregorian mission of 597, which was joined by the efforts of the Hiberno-Scottish mission from the 630s. From the 8th century, the Anglo-Saxon mission was in turn instrumental in the conversion of the population of the Frankish Empire. Æthelberht of Kent was the first king to accept baptism, circa 601. He was followed by Saebert of Essex and Rædwald of East Anglia in 604. However, when Æthelberht andSaebert died, in 616, they were both succeeded by pagan sons who were hostile to Christianity and drove the missionaries out, encouraging their subjects to return to their native paganism. Christianity only hung on with Rædwald, who was still worshiping the pagan gods alongside Christ. The first Archbishops of Canterbury during the first half of the 7th century were members of the original Gregorian mission
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Cumae Alphabet
Many local variants of the Greek alphabet
Greek alphabet
were employed in ancient Greece during the archaic and early classical periods, until they were replaced by the classical 24-letter alphabet that is the standard today, around 400 BC
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Four Evangelists
In Christian tradition, the Four Evangelists
Four Evangelists
are Matthew, Mark, Luke, and John, the authors attributed with the creation of the four Gospel accounts in the New Testament
New Testament
that bear the following titles: Gospel according to Matthew; Gospel
Gospel
according to Mark; Gospel
Gospel
according to Luke and Gospel
Gospel
according to John.Contents1 Gospels 2 Symbols 3 Naming 4 Depictions 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGospels[edit]The four winged creatures that symbolise the Four Evangelists
Four Evangelists
surround Christ in Majesty
Christ in Majesty
on the Romanesque tympanum of the Church of St. Trophime in Arles.The lion symbol of St. Mark
St

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