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Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
is a collection of annals in Old English chronicling the history of the Anglo-Saxons. The original manuscript of the Chronicle was created late in the 9th century, probably in Wessex, during the reign of Alfred the Great
Alfred the Great
(r. 871–899). Multiple copies were made of that one original and then distributed to monasteries across England, where they were independently updated. In one case, the Chronicle was still being actively updated in 1154. Nine manuscripts survive in whole or in part, though not all are of equal historical value and none of them is the original version. The oldest seems to have been started towards the end of Alfred's reign, while the most recent was written at Peterborough Abbey after a fire at that monastery in 1116
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Written Language
A written language is the representation of a spoken or gestural language by means of a writing system. Written language
Written language
is an invention in that it must be taught to children, who will pick up spoken language (oral or sign) by exposure even if they are not specifically taught. A written language exists only as a complement to a specific spoken language, and no natural language is purely written.Contents1 Compared to spoken language 2 See also 3 Further reading 4 External linksCompared to spoken language[edit]This section does not cite any sources. Please help improve this section by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (February 2010) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Written languages change more slowly than corresponding spoken languages. When at least one register of a language is strongly divergent from spoken language, the resulting situation is called diglossia
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Mercia
Mercia (/ˈmɜːrʃiə, -ʃə/;[1] Old English: Miercna rīce) was one of the kingdoms of the Anglo-Saxon Heptarchy. The name is a Latinisation of the Old English Mierce or Myrce, meaning "border people" (see March). The kingdom was centred on the valley of the River Trent and its tributaries, in the region now known as the English Midlands. The kingdom's "capital" was the town of Tamworth, which was the seat of the Mercian Kings from at least c. 584, when King Creoda built a fortress at the town. For 300 years (between 600 and 900), having annexed or gained submissions from five of the other six kingdoms of the Heptarchy (East Anglia, Essex, Kent, Sussex and Wessex), Mercia dominated England south of the River Humber: this period is known as the Mercian Supremacy. The reign of King Offa, who is best remembered for his Dyke that designated the boundary between Mercia and the Welsh kingdoms, is sometimes known as the "Golden Age of Mercia"
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Cotton Otho
Cotton
Cotton
is a soft, fluffy staple fiber that grows in a boll, or protective case, around the seeds of the cotton plants of the genus Gossypium
Gossypium
in the mallow family Malvaceae. The fiber is almost pure cellulose. Under natural conditions, the cotton bolls will increase the dispersal of the seeds. The plant is a shrub native to tropical and subtropical regions around the world, including the Americas, Africa, and India. The greatest diversity of wild cotton species is found in Mexico, followed by Australia
Australia
and Africa.[1] Cotton
Cotton
was independently domesticated in the Old and New Worlds. The fiber is most often spun into yarn or thread and used to make a soft, breathable textile
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Pope
The pope (Latin: papa from Greek: πάππας pappas,[1] a child's word for "father"),[2] also known as the supreme pontiff (from Latin pontifex maximus "greatest bridge-builder"), is the Bishop
Bishop
of Rome, and therefore ex officio the leader of the worldwide Catholic Church.[3] The primacy of the Roman bishop is largely derived from his role as the supposed apostolic successor to Saint Peter, to whom Jesus is said to have given the Keys of Heaven
Keys of Heaven
and the powers of "binding and loosing", naming him as the "rock" upon which the church would be built. The pope is also head of state of Vatican City,[4] a sovereign city-state entirely enclaved within Rome. The current pope is Francis, who was elected on 13 March 2013, succeeding Benedict XVI.[5] The office of the pope is the papacy
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Rolls Series
The Chronicles and Memorials of Great Britain and Ireland during the Middle Ages (Latin: Rerum Britannicarum medii aevi scriptores), widely known as the Rolls Series, is a major collection of British and Irish historical materials and primary sources published as 99 works in 253 volumes between 1858 and 1911.[1] Almost all the great medieval English chronicles were included: most existing editions, published by scholars of the 17th and 18th centuries, were considered to be unsatisfactory. The scope was also extended to include legendary, folklore and hagiographical materials, and archival records and legal tracts
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Archbishop Of Canterbury
The Archbishop of Canterbury
Canterbury
is the senior bishop and principal leader of the Church of England, the symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the diocesan bishop of the Diocese of Canterbury. The current archbishop is Justin Welby, who was enthroned at Canterbury Cathedral on 21 March 2013. Welby is the 105th in a line which goes back more than 1400 years to Augustine of Canterbury, the "Apostle to the English", sent from Rome
Rome
in the year 597. Welby succeeded Rowan Williams.[1] From the time of Augustine until the 16th century, the Archbishops of Canterbury
Canterbury
were in full communion with the See of Rome
Rome
and usually received the pallium from the Pope. During the English Reformation, the Church of England
Church of England
broke away from the authority of the Catholic Church
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Abingdon Abbey
Abingdon Abbey
Abbey
was a Benedictine
Benedictine
monastery also known as St Mary's Abbey
Abbey
located in Abingdon, historically in the county of Berkshire
Berkshire
but now in Oxfordshire, England.[1]Contents1 History 2 Other burials 3 Extant buildings 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The abbey was supposedly founded in 675 either by Cissa, viceroy of Centwine, king of the West Saxons, or by his nephew Hean, in honour of the Virgin Mary, for twelve Benedictine
Benedictine
monks.[2] Cissa was buried here, as well. Endowed by successive West Saxon kings, it grew in importance and wealth until its destruction by the Danes in the reign of King Alfred, and the sequestration of its estates by Alfred because the monks had not made him a sufficient requital for vanquishing their enemies
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Doom Book
The Doom Book, Code of Alfred or Legal Code of Ælfred the Great was the code of laws ("dooms" being laws or judgments) compiled by Alfred the Great (c. 893 AD)
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Recension
Recension is the practice of editing or revising a text based on critical analysis.[1] When referring to manuscripts, this may be a revision by another author. The term is derived from Latin recensio "review, analysis". In textual criticism, particularly Biblical scholarship, the count noun "recension" may be used to refer to a family of manuscripts sharing similar traits;[2] for example, the Alexandrian text-type
Alexandrian text-type
may be referred to as the "Alexandrian recension"
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Winchester
Winchester
Winchester
is a city and the county town of Hampshire, England. The city lies at the heart of the wider City of Winchester, a local government district, and is located at the western end of the South Downs National Park, along the course of the River Itchen.[2] It is situated 61 miles (98 km) south-west of London
London
and 13.6 miles (21.9 km) from Southampton, its closest city. At the time of the 2011 Census, Winchester
Winchester
had a population of 45,184. The wider City of Winchester
Winchester
district which includes towns such as Alresford and Bishop's Waltham
Bishop's Waltham
has a population of 116,800. [3] Winchester
Winchester
developed from the Roman town of Venta Belgarum, which in turn developed from an Iron Age
Iron Age
oppidum
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Paulus Orosius
Paulus Orosius
Orosius
(/ˈpɔːləs ɔːˈroʊʒiəs/; born c. 375, died after 418 AD)[1] — less often Paul Orosius
Orosius
in English — was a Gallaecian Chalcedonian priest, historian and theologian, a student of Augustine of Hippo. It is possible that he was born in Bracara Augusta (now Braga, Portugal), then capital of the Roman province of Gallaecia, and which would be the capital of the Kingdom of the Suebi by his death.[2] Although there are some questions regarding his biography, such as his exact date of birth, it is known that he was a person of some prestige from a cultural point of view, as he had contact with the greatest figures of his time such as Saint Augustine of Hippo and Saint Jerome. In order to meet with them Orosius travelled to cities on the southern coast of the Mediterranean Sea, such as Hippo Regius
Hippo Regius
and Alexandria. These journeys defined his life and intellectual output
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Frank Stenton
Sir Frank Merry Stenton (17 May 1880 – 15 September 1967) was a 20th-century historian of Anglo-Saxon England, and president of the Royal Historical Society (1937–1945).[1] He was the author of Anglo-Saxon England, a volume of the Oxford History of England, first published in 1943 and widely considered a classic history of the period. He delivered the Ford Lectures
Ford Lectures
at Oxford University
Oxford University
in 1929. Stenton was a professor of history at the University of Reading (1926-1946), and subsequently the university's vice-chancellor (1946-1950). During Stenton's period as vice-chancellor at Reading, he presided over the university's purchase of Whiteknights Park, creating the new campus that allowed for the expansion of the university in later decades
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Parker Library, Corpus Christi College
Christi is a feminine given name. Notable people with the name include: Christi Belcourt
Christi Belcourt
(born 1966), Métis painter, craftsperson, and writer Christi Lake (born 1965), American pornographic actress Christi Malthouse (born 1976), Australian television personality Christi Paul (born 1969), American television journalist Christi Shake
Christi Shake
(born 1980), American model and actress Christi Thomas (born 1982), American basketball playerSee also[edit]Christ (other) Christa (other) Christe Christie (other) Christo (other) Christy (other) Cristi (name) Kristi (other)This page or section lists people that share the same given name
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Pallium
The pallium (derived from the Roman pallium or palla, a woolen cloak; pl.: pallia) is an ecclesiastical vestment in the Roman Catholic Church,[n 1] originally peculiar to the Pope, but for many centuries bestowed by him on metropolitans and primates as a symbol of the jurisdiction delegated to them by the Holy See.[1] In that context, it has remained connected to the papacy.[2] [3] The pallium, in its present Western form, is a narrow band, "three fingers broad", woven of white lamb's wool from sheep raised by Trappist
Trappist
monks, with a loop in the centre resting on the shoulders over the chasuble and two dependent lappets, before and behind; so that when seen from front or back the ornament resembles the letter Y. It is decorated with six black crosses, one on each tail and four on the loop, is doubled on the left shoulder, and sometimes is garnished, back and front, with three jeweled gold pins
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