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Anglican Devotions
Anglican
Anglican
devotions are private prayers and practices used by Anglican Christians to promote spiritual growth and communion with God. Among members of the Anglican
Anglican
Communion, private devotional habits vary widely, depending on personal preference and on their affiliation with low-church or high-church parishes. Private prayer and Bible
Bible
reading are probably the most common practices of devout Anglicans outside church. Some base their private prayers on the Book of Common Prayer. Devotional practices among people and parishes who self-identify as Anglo-Catholic
Anglo-Catholic
will naturally be different from those Anglicans who are Evangelical. Anglo-Catholics are likely to follow devotional customs familiar to the majority of Christians that have roots in the early and mediaeval periods as well as the contemporary form of devotion
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Thirty-Nine Articles
The Thirty-nine Articles
Thirty-nine Articles
of Religion (commonly abbreviated as the Thirty-nine Articles
Thirty-nine Articles
or the XXXIX Articles) are the historically defining statements of doctrines and practices of the Church of England with respect to the controversies of the English Reformation. The Thirty-nine Articles
Thirty-nine Articles
form part of the Book of Common Prayer
Book of Common Prayer
used by both the Church of England
Church of England
and the Episcopal Church. Several versions are available online. When Henry VIII
Henry VIII
broke with the Roman Catholic Church
Roman Catholic Church
and was excommunicated, he formed a new Church of England, which would be headed by the monarch (himself) rather than the pope
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Anglican Shrine Of Our Lady Of Walsingham
The Anglican Shrine of Our Lady of Walsingham
Walsingham
is a Church of England shrine church built in 1938 in Walsingham, Norfolk, England. Walsingham
Walsingham
is the site of the reputed Marian apparitions
Marian apparitions
to Richeldis de Faverches in 1061. The Virgin Mary
Virgin Mary
is therefore venerated at the site with the title of Our Lady of Walsingham.Contents1 History 2 List of priest administrators 3 Associated groups 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Father Alfred Hope Patten SSC, appointed as the Church of England Vicar of Walsingham
Walsingham
in 1921, ignited Anglican interest in the pre-Reformation pilgrimage. It was his idea to create a new statue of Our Lady of Walsingham
Walsingham
based on the image depicted on the seal of the medieval priory
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Morning Prayer (Anglican)
Morning Prayer (also Matins or Mattins), is one of the two main Daily Offices in Anglican
Anglican
churches, prescribed in the various editions of the Book of Common Prayer
Book of Common Prayer
and other Anglican
Anglican
liturgical texts. Like Evening Prayer (and in contrast to the Eucharist), it may be led by a layperson and is recited by some Anglicans daily in private (clergy in many Anglican
Anglican
jurisdictions are required to do so).Contents1 History 2 Origins of liturgical shape 3 Elements3.1 Traditional prayer books 3.2 Common Worship 3.3 American Episcopal Church 3.4 Book of Alternative Services4 Canticles 5 MusicHistory[edit] In its classic form, in the 1662 version of the Prayer Book, the Morning Prayer is essentially unchanged from Archbishop Thomas Cranmer’s Second Prayer Book of Edward VI, published in 1552
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Compline
Compline (/ˈkɒmplɪn/ KOM-plin), also known as Complin, Night Prayer, or the Prayers at the End of the Day, is the final church service (or office) of the day in the Christian
Christian
tradition of canonical hours. The English word Compline is derived from the Latin completorium, as Compline is the completion of the working day. The word was first used in this sense about the beginning of the 6th century by St. Benedict
St. Benedict
in his Rule (Regula Benedicti; hereafter, RB), in Chapters 16, 17, 18, and 42, and he even uses the verb complere to signify Compline: "Omnes ergo in unum positi compleant" ("All having assembled in one place, let them say Compline"); "et exeuntes a completorio" ("and, after going out from Compline")... (RB, Chap
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Roman Catholic Church
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Liturgy Of The Hours
The Liturgy of the Hours
Liturgy of the Hours
(Latin: Liturgia Horarum) or Divine Office (Latin: Officium Divinum) or Work of God (Latin: Opus Dei) or canonical hours,[a] often referred to as the Breviary,[b] is the official set of prayers "marking the hours of each day and sanctifying the day with prayer".[3] It consists primarily of psalms supplemented by hymns, readings and other prayers and antiphons
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Anglican Breviary
The Anglican
Anglican
Breviary is the Anglican
Anglican
edition of the Divine Office translated into English, used especially by Anglicans of Anglo-Catholic churchmanship
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Litany
Litany, in Christian worship
Christian worship
and some forms of Judaic worship, is a form of prayer used in services and processions, and consisting of a number of petitions
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Lectio Divina
In Christianity, Lectio Divina
Lectio Divina
( Latin
Latin
for "Divine Reading") is a traditional Benedictine practice of scriptural reading, meditation and prayer intended to promote communion with God and to increase the knowledge of God's Word.[1] It does not treat Scripture
Scripture
as texts to be studied, but as the Living Word.[2] Traditionally, Lectio Divina
Lectio Divina
has four separate steps: read; meditate; pray; contemplate. First a passage of Scripture
Scripture
is read, then its meaning is reflected upon. This is followed by prayer and contemplation on the Word of God.[3] The focus of Lectio Divina
Lectio Divina
is not a theological analysis of biblical passages but viewing them with Christ
Christ
as the key to their meaning
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Saints In Anglicanism
The term "saint" is a context-specific translation of the Latin "sanctus", meaning sacred, and originally referred to a sacred (extremely holy) person—however, since the 10th century, the Church has reserved the status of saint to people its official canon law (including calendar) has recognised for outstanding Christian service and conduct. When the Church of England
Church of England
was in union with Rome saints arose in the form of canonisation. Those martyrs and confessors recognised before the 10th century and since the break with Rome in the 16th century are generally still considered both "saints" and "Saints".[1] "Hero/heroine" are sometimes to refer to those holy people whom the church synod or an individual church praises as having had special benevolence who have lived and died since the split with Rome
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Norfolk
Norfolk (/ˈnɔːrfək/) is a county in East Anglia in England. It borders Lincolnshire to the northwest, Cambridgeshire to the west and southwest, and Suffolk to the south. Its northern and eastern boundaries are the North Sea and, to the north-west, The Wash. The county town is Norwich. With an area of 2,074 square miles (5,370 km2) and a population of 859,400, Norfolk is a largely rural county with a population density of 401 per square mile (155 per km²). Of the county's population, 40% live in four major built up areas: Norwich (213,000), Great Yarmouth (63,000), King's Lynn (46,000) and Thetford (25,000).[4] The Broads is a network of rivers and lakes in the east of the county, extending south into Suffolk. The area is not a national park[5] although it is marketed as such
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Church Of England
The Church of England
England
(C of E) is the state church of England.[3][4][5] The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
(currently Justin Welby) is the most senior cleric, although the monarch is the supreme governor. The Church of England
England
is also the mother church of the international Anglican
Anglican
Communion
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Veneration
Veneration
Veneration
( Latin
Latin
veneratio or dulia, Greek δουλεία, douleia), or veneration of saints, is the act of honoring a saint, a person who has been identified as having a high degree of sanctity or holiness.[1] Angels are shown similar veneration in many religions. Philologically, "to venerate" derives from the Latin
Latin
verb, venerare, meaning to regard with reverence and respect. Veneration
Veneration
of saints is practiced, formally or informally, by adherents of some branches of all major religions, including Christianity, Judaism,[2] Hinduism,[3] Islam,[4] and Buddhism.[1][3] Within Christianity, veneration is practiced by groups such as the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Roman Catholic, and Eastern Catholic Churches, all of which have varying types of canonization or glorification procedures
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Latria
Latria is a theological term ( Latin
Latin
Latrīa, from the Greek λατρεία, latreia) used in Eastern Orthodox and Roman Catholic theology to mean adoration, a reverence directed only to the Holy Trinity. Latria carries an emphasis on the internal form of worship, rather than external ceremonies.[1]Contents1 Eucharist 2 Latria vs. Dulia
Dulia
and Hyperdulia 3 Linguistic distinctions in English 4 References 5 External linksEucharist[edit] Latria also applies to the Eucharist
Eucharist
and Eucharistic adoration
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