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Anglican Communion
The Anglican
Anglican
Communion is the third largest Christian communion with 85 million members,[1][2] founded in 1867 in London, England. It consists of the Church of England
England
and national and regional Anglican episcopal polities in full communion with it,[3] with traditional origins of their doctrines summarised in the Thirty-nine Articles (1571). Archbishop
Archbishop
Justin Welby
Justin Welby
of Canterbury
Canterbury
acts as a focus of unity, recognised as primus inter pares ("first among equals"), but does not exercise authority in the provinces outside England. The Anglican
Anglican
Communion was founded at the Lambeth Conference
Lambeth Conference
in 1867 in London, England, under the leadership of Charles Longley, Archbishop
Archbishop
of Canterbury
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Christian Art
Christian art
Christian art
is sacred art which uses themes and imagery from Christianity. Most Christian groups use or have used art to some extent, although some have had strong objections to some forms of religious image, and there have been major periods of iconoclasm within Christianity. Images of Jesus
Jesus
and narrative scenes from the Life of Christ are the most common subjects, and scenes from the Old Testament
Old Testament
play a part in the art of most denominations. Images of the Virgin Mary and saints are much rarer in Protestant art than that of Roman Catholicism and Eastern Orthodoxy. Christianity
Christianity
makes far wider use of images than related religions, in which figurative representations are forbidden, such as Islam and Judaism
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Charles Longley
Charles Thomas Longley (28 July 1794 – 27 October 1868)[1] was a bishop in the Church of England. He served as Bishop of Ripon, Bishop of Durham, Archbishop of York
Archbishop of York
and Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
from 1862 until his death.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 Notes 4 References 5 External linksLife[edit] He was born at Rochester, Kent, the fifth son of the late John Longley, Recorder of Rochester,[2] and educated at Westminster School and Christ Church, Oxford.[3] He was ordained in 1818, and was appointed vicar of Cowley, Oxford, in 1823. In 1827, he received the rectory of West Tytherley, Hampshire, and two years later he was elected headmaster of Harrow School. He held this office until 1836, when he was consecrated bishop of the new see of Ripon
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Holy Spirit (Christianity)
For the majority of Christian denominations, the Holy Spirit
Holy Spirit
or Holy Ghost is the third person (hypostasis) of the Trinity: the Triune God manifested as God the Father, God the Son, and Holy Spirit; each person itself being God.[2][3][4] Some Christian theologians identify the Holy Spirit
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God The Son
God the Son
God the Son
(Greek: Θεός ὁ υἱός) is the second person, of the Trinity
Trinity
in Christian theology. The doctrine of the Trinity identifies Jesus
Jesus
as the metaphysical embodiment of God the Son, united in essence (consubstantial) but distinct in person with regard to God the Father and God the Holy Spirit (the first and third persons of the Trinity). In these teachings, God the Son
God the Son
pre-existed before incarnation, is co-eternal with God the Father
God the Father
(and the Holy Spirit), both before Creation and after the End (see Eschatology)
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Christian Theology
Christian
Christian
theology is the theology of Christian
Christian
belief and practice.[1] Such study concentrates primarily upon the texts of the Old Testament
Old Testament
and of the New Testament, as well as on Christian tradition. Christian
Christian
theologians use biblical exegesis, rational analysis and argument
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Biblical Canon
Outline of Bible-related topics   Bible
Bible
book    Bible
Bible
portalv t eA biblical canon or canon of scripture[1] is a set of texts (or "books") which a particular religious community regards as authoritative scripture. The English word "canon" comes from the Greek κανών, meaning "rule" or "measuring stick"
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Anglican Church (other)
Anglican Church usually refers to the Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion
or one of its member churches. Anglican Church may also refer to:Anglican Church (Bordighera), in Italy Anglican Church (Bucharest), in RomaniaThis disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Anglican Church. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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London
London
London
(/ˈlʌndən/ ( listen)) is the capital and most populous city of England
England
and the United Kingdom.[7][8] Standing on the River Thames
River Thames
in the south east of the island of Great Britain, London has been a major settlement for two millennia. It was founded by the Romans, who named it Londinium.[9] London's ancient core, the City of London, largely retains its 1.12-square-mile (2.9 km2) medieval boundaries
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Communion (Christian)
The bond uniting Christians as individuals and groups with each other and with Jesus
Jesus
is described as communion.Contents1 Origin 2 New Testament 3 Aspects3.1 Between churches 3.2 Communion of saints4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External linksOrigin[edit] The term is derived from Latin communio (sharing in common).[1] This basic meaning of the word predates its Christian uses
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Christian Prayer
Prayer
Prayer
is an important activity in Christianity, and there are several different forms of Christian
Christian
prayer.[1] Christian
Christian
prayers are diverse: they can be completely spontaneous, or read entirely from a text, like the Anglican
Anglican
Book of Common Prayer. The most common prayer among Christians is the "Lord's Prayer", which according to the gospel accounts (e.g. Matthew 6:9-13) is how Jesus taught his disciples to pray.[2] "The Lord's Prayer" is a model for prayers of adoration, confession and petition in Christianity.[2] A broad, three stage characterization of prayer begins with vocal prayer, then moves on to a more structured form in terms of meditation, then reaches the multiple layers of contemplation,[3][4] or intercession. There are two basic settings for Christian
Christian
prayer: corporate (or public) and private
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Ecclesiastical Polity
Ecclesiastical polity is the operational and governance structure of a church or of a Christian denomination. It also denotes the ministerial structure of a church and the authority relationships between churches. Polity relates closely to ecclesiology, the study of doctrine and theology relating to church organization.Contents1 History 2 Use as a term 3 Types of polity3.1 Episcopal polity 3.2 Hierarchical polity 3.3 Connexional polity 3.4 Presbyterian
Presbyterian
polity 3.5 Congregational polity4 Polity, autonomy, and ecumenism 5 Plurality and singularity 6 See also 7 References 8 Further reading 9 External linksHistory[edit] Issues of church governance appear in the first chapters of the Acts of the Apostles; the first act recorded after the ascension is the election of Matthias as one of the Twelve Apostles, replacing Judas Iscariot
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England
England
England
is a country that is part of the United Kingdom.[6][7][8] It shares land borders with Scotland
Scotland
to the north and Wales
Wales
to the west. The Irish Sea
Irish Sea
lies northwest of England
England
and the Celtic Sea
Celtic Sea
lies to the southwest. England
England
is separated from continental Europe
Europe
by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel
English Channel
to the south
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Canterbury
Canterbury
Canterbury
(/ˈkæntərbri/ ( listen), /-bəri/, or /-bɛri/)[3] is a historic English cathedral city and UNESCO World Heritage Site, which lies at the heart of the City of Canterbury, a local government district of Kent, England. It lies on the River Stour. The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
is the primate of the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion
owing to the importance of St Augustine, who served as the apostle to the pagan Kingdom of Kent around the turn of the 7th century. The city's cathedral became a major focus of pilgrimage following the 1170 martyrdom of Thomas Becket, although it had already been a well-trodden pilgrim destination since the murder of St Alphege
Alphege
by the men of King Canute in 1012
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Canterbury Cathedral
Canterbury
Canterbury
Cathedral
Cathedral
in Canterbury, Kent, is one of the oldest and most famous Christian structures in England. It forms part of a World Heritage Site. It is the cathedral of the Archbishop
Archbishop
of Canterbury, currently Justin Welby, leader of the Church of England
Church of England
and symbolic leader of the worldwide Anglican Communion; the archbishop, being suitably occupied with national and international matters, delegates most of his functions as diocesan bishop to the Bishop
Bishop
suffragan of Dover, currently Trevor Willmott. Its formal title is the Cathedral and Metropolitical Church of Christ at Canterbury. Founded in 597, the cathedral was completely rebuilt from 1070 to 1077
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Justin Welby
Justin Portal
Portal
Welby (born 6 January 1956)[2] is the 105th Archbishop of Canterbury
Canterbury
and the most senior bishop in the Church of England. Welby was the vicar of Southam, Warwickshire,[3] and most recently was the Bishop of Durham, serving for just over a year.[4] As Archbishop of Canterbury, he is the Primate of All England
Primate of All England
and the symbolic head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. Welby's early career was in the oil industry. In 1989, he studied for ordination at St John's College, Durham
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