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Angel Investors
An angel investor (also known as a business angel, informal investor, angel funder, private investor, or seed investor) is an affluent individual who provides capital for a business start-up, usually in exchange for convertible debt or ownership equity. A small but increasing number of angel investors invest online through equity crowdfunding or organize themselves into angel groups or angel networks to share research and pool their investment capital, as well as to provide advice to their portfolio companies.[1]Contents1 Etymology and origin 2 Source and extent of funding 3 Investment profile 4 Geographical differences4.1 US 4.2 UK 4.3 Canada 4.4 Russia 4.5 Asia5 See also 6 References 7 External linksEtymology and origin[edit] The application of the term "angel" to a kind of investor originally comes from Broadway theater, where it was used to describe wealthy individuals who provided money for theatrical productions that would otherwise have had to shut down
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Securities And Exchange Commission
The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission
(SEC) is an independent agency of the United States federal government. The SEC holds primary responsibility for enforcing the federal securities laws, proposing securities rules, and regulating the securities industry, the nation's stock and options exchanges, and other activities and organizations, including the electronic securities markets in the United States.[2] In addition to the Securities Exchange Act of 1934, which created it, the SEC enforces the Securities Act of 1933, the Trust Indenture Act of 1939, the Investment
Investment
Company Act of 1940, the Investment
Investment
Advisers Act of 1940, the Sarbanes–Oxley Act
Sarbanes–Oxley Act
of 2002, and other statutes
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Return On Investment
Return on Investment
Investment
(ROI) is the ratio between the net profit and cost of investment resulting from an investment of some resource. A high ROI means the investment's gains compare favorably to its cost. As a performance measure, ROI is used to evaluate the efficiency of an investment or to compare the efficiencies of several different investments.[1] In purely economic terms, it is one way of relating profits to capital invested.Contents1 Purpose1.1 Risk with ROI usage2 Calculation2.1 Property 2.2 Marketing investment3 See also 4 ReferencesPurpose[edit] In business, the purpose of the return on investment (ROI) metric is to measure, per period, rates of return on money invested in an economic entity in order to decide whether or not to undertake an investment. It is also used as an indicator to compare different investments within a portfolio
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Eastern Europe
Eastern Europe
Europe
is the eastern part of the European continent. There is no consensus on the precise area it covers, partly because the term has a wide range of geopolitical, geographical, cultural, and socioeconomic connotations. There are "almost as many definitions of Eastern Europe
Europe
as there are scholars of the region".[1] A related United Nations
United Nations
paper adds that "every assessment of spatial identities is essentially a social and cultural construct".[2] One definition describes Eastern Europe
Europe
as a cultural entity: the region lying in Europe
Europe
with the main characteristics consisting of Greek, Byzantine, Eastern Orthodox, Russian, and some Ottoman culture influences.[3][4] Another definition was created during the Cold War and used more or less synonymously with the term Eastern Bloc
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Russian Federation
Coordinates: 60°N 90°E / 60°N 90°E / 60; 90Russian Federation Росси́йская Федерaция (Russian) Rossiyskaya FederatsiyaFlagCoat of armsAnthem:  "Gosudarstvenny gimn Rossiyskoy Federatsii"  (transliteration) "State Anthem of the Russian Federation"Location of Russia
Russia
(green) Russian-administered Crimea
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Impact Investing
Impact investing refers to investments "made into companies, organizations, and funds with the intention to generate a measurable, beneficial social or environmental impact alongside a financial return."[1] Impact investments provide capital to address social and/or environmental issues
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UK
The United Kingdom
United Kingdom
of Great Britain
Great Britain
and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
(UK) or Britain, is a sovereign country in western Europe
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NESTA
Nesta (formerly NESTA, National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts) is an innovation foundation based in the UK. The organisation acts through a combination of practical programmes, investment, policy and research, and the formation of partnerships to promote innovation across a broad range of sectors. Nesta was originally funded by a £250 million endowment from the UK National Lottery. The endowment is now kept in trust, and Nesta uses the interest from the trust to meet its charitable objects and to fund and support its projects. The charity is registered in England and Wales with charity no. 1144091 and in Scotland with no
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Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act
The Jumpstart Our Business Startups Act, or JOBS Act, is a law intended to encourage funding of small businesses in the United States by easing many of the country's securities regulations. It passed with bipartisan support, and was signed into law by President Barack Obama on April 5, 2012. Title III, also known as the CROWDFUND Act, has drawn the most public attention because it creates a way for companies to use crowdfunding to issue securities, something that was not previously permitted.[1] Title II went into effect on September 23, 2013.[2] On October 30, 2015, the SEC adopted final rules allowing Title III equity crowdfunding.[3][4] These rules went into effect on May 16, 2016
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Convertible Debt
In finance, a convertible bond or convertible note or convertible debt (or a convertible debenture if it has a maturity of greater than 10 years) is a type of bond that the holder can convert into a specified number of shares of common stock in the issuing company or cash of equal value. It is a hybrid security with debt- and equity-like features.[1] It originated in the mid-19th century, and was used by early speculators such as Jacob Little
Jacob Little
and Daniel Drew
Daniel Drew
to counter market cornering.[2] Convertible bonds are most often issued by companies with a low credit rating and high growth potential. Convertible bonds are also considered debt security because the companies agree to give fixed or floating interest rate as they do in common bonds for the funds of investor
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Accredited Investor
An accredited or sophisticated investor is an investor with a special status under financial regulation laws. The definition of an accredited investor (if any), and the consequences of being classified as such, vary between countries. Generally, accredited investors include high-net-worth individuals, banks, financial institutions and other large corporations, who have access to complex and higher-risk investments such as venture capital, hedge funds and angel investments. Laws may require that some types of financial offerings may only be made to accredited investors.[1]Contents1 Criteria for accreditation1.1 Australia 1.2 Brazil 1.3 Canada 1.4 European Union 1.5 Israel 1.6 New Zealand 1.7 Singapore 1.8 United States1.8.1 Proposed new accredited investor class for hedge funds2 See also 3 ReferencesCriteria for accreditation[edit] Australia[edit] s 708(8) of the Corporations Act 2001
Corporations Act 2001
is found in Chapter 6D (Fundraising)
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Silicon Valley
Silicon
Silicon
Valley (abbreviated as SV or The Valley) is a region of in the southern San Francisco Bay Area
San Francisco Bay Area
of Northern California, referring to the Santa Clara Valley, which serves as the global center for high technology, venture capital, innovation, & social media. San Jose is the Valley's largest city, the 3rd largest in California, and the 10th largest in the United States. Other major SV cities include Palo Alto, Santa Clara, Mountain View, and Sunnyvale
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Bank
A bank is a financial institution that accepts deposits from the public and creates credit.[1] Lending
Lending
activities can be performed either directly or indirectly through capital markets. Due to their importance in the financial stability of a country, banks are highly regulated in most countries. Most nations have institutionalized a system known as fractional reserve banking under which banks hold liquid assets equal to only a portion of their current liabilities. In addition to other regulations intended to ensure liquidity, banks are generally subject to minimum capital requirements based on an international set of capital standards, known as the Basel Accords. Banking
Banking
in its modern sense evolved in the 14th century in the prosperous cities of Renaissance Italy
Renaissance Italy
but in many ways was a continuation of ideas and concepts of credit and lending that had their roots in the ancient world
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Mergers And Acquisitions
Mergers and acquisitions
Mergers and acquisitions
(M&A) are transactions in which the ownership of companies, other business organizations or their operating units are transferred or combined. As an aspect of strategic management, M&A can allow enterprises to grow, shrink, and change the nature of their business or competitive position. From a legal point of view, a merger is a legal consolidation of two entities into one entity, whereas an acquisition occurs when one entity takes ownership of another entity's stock, equity interests or assets. From a commercial and economic point of view, both types of transactions generally result in the consolidation of assets and liabilities under one entity, and the distinction between a "merger" and an "acquisition" is less clear
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Initial Public Offering
Initial public offering
Initial public offering
(IPO) or stock market launch is a type of public offering in which shares of a company are sold to institutional investors[1] and usually also retail (individual) investors; an IPO is underwritten by one or more investment banks, who also arrange for the shares to be listed on one or more stock exchange. Through this process, colloquially known as floating, or going public, a privately held company is transformed into a public company. Initial public offerings can be used: to raise new equity capital for the company concerned; to monetize the investments of private shareholders such as company founders or private equity investors; and to enable easy trading of existing holdings or future capital raising by becoming publicly traded enterprises. After the IPO, those shares which trade freely in the open market are known as the free float
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