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Angband (Middle-earth)
In J. R. R. Tolkien's fantasy world of Middle-earth, Angband
Angband
(Sindarin for 'iron prison') is the name of the fortress of Melkor, constructed before the First Age, located in the Iron Mountains in the enemy's land Dor Daedeloth north of Beleriand.[1][2] The fortress is described in Tolkien's The Silmarillion. It was built by Melkor (later called Morgoth) to guard against a possible attack from Aman by the Valar. Nonetheless, the Valar's attack succeeded in capturing Morgoth and destroying his main stronghold Utumno. However, while the Valar had focused on destroying Utumno utterly, Angband, though devastated, was only partially destroyed. Over time, the dark creatures in Morgoth's service would gather in its ruined pits
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Angband (video Game)
Angband
Angband
is a dungeon-crawling roguelike computer game derived from Umoria. It is based on the writings of J. R. R. Tolkien, in which Angband
Angband
is the fortress of Morgoth. The current version of Angband
Angband
is available for all major operating systems, including Unix, Windows, Mac OS
Mac OS
X, and Android.Contents1 Gameplay 2 History 3 Community 4 Derivative works 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksGameplay[edit] The goal of Angband
Angband
is to survive 100 floor levels of the fortress Angband
Angband
in order to defeat Morgoth.[1] The game is reputed to be extremely difficult.[2][3] The player begins in a town where s/he can buy equipment before beginning the descent
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HarperCollins
HarperCollins
HarperCollins
Publishers L.L.C. is one of the world's largest publishing companies and is one of the Big Five English-language publishing companies, alongside Hachette, Macmillan, Penguin Random House, and Simon & Schuster. The company is headquartered in New York City and is a subsidiary of News Corp. The name is a combination of several publishing firm names: Harper & Row, an American publishing company acquired in 1987 (whose own name was the result of an earlier merger of Harper & Brothers (founded 1817) and Row, Peterson & Company), together with UK publishing company William Collins, Sons (founded 1819), acquired in 1990. The worldwide CEO of HarperCollins
HarperCollins
is Brian Murray.[1] HarperCollins has publishing groups in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Australia, New Zealand, India, and China
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Michael D. C. Drout
Michael D. C. Drout (born 1968) is Professor of English and Director of the Center for the Study of the Medieval at Wheaton College. He is an author and editor specializing in Anglo-Saxon and medieval literature, science fiction and fantasy, especially the works of J. R. R. Tolkien and Ursula K. Le Guin. Drout holds a Ph.D. in English from Loyola University Chicago
Loyola University Chicago
(May 1997), an M.A. in English from the University of Missouri
University of Missouri
(May 1993), an M.A. in Communication from Stanford University
Stanford University
(May 1991), and a B.A
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J. R. R. Tolkien Encyclopedia
Michael D. C. Drout (born 1968) is Professor of English and Director of the Center for the Study of the Medieval at Wheaton College. He is an author and editor specializing in Anglo-Saxon and medieval literature, science fiction and fantasy, especially the works of J. R. R. Tolkien and Ursula K. Le Guin. Drout holds a Ph.D. in English from Loyola University Chicago
Loyola University Chicago
(May 1997), an M.A. in English from the University of Missouri
University of Missouri
(May 1993), an M.A. in Communication from Stanford University
Stanford University
(May 1991), and a B.A
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Routledge
Routledge
Routledge
(/ˈraʊtlɪdʒ/)[2] is a British multinational publisher. It was founded in 1836 by George Routledge, and specialises in providing academic books, journals, & online resources in the fields of humanities, behavioural science, education, law and social science
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Karen Wynn Fonstad
Karen Lea Wynn Fonstad (April 18, 1945 – March 11, 2005) was an American cartographer and academic who designed several atlases of fictional worlds.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Career 3 Death 4 Works 5 References 6 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Born Karen Lea Wynn in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
to parents James and Estis Wynn, she graduated from Norman High School in Norman, Oklahoma, and then earned a B.S. degree in Physical Therapy and an M.A. in Geography, specializing in cartography, from the University of Oklahoma. While attending the University of Oklahoma
University of Oklahoma
she met Todd A. Fonstad
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The Atlas Of Middle-earth
The Atlas of Middle-earth
Middle-earth
by Karen Wynn Fonstad is an atlas of J. R. R. Tolkien's fictional realm of Middle-earth.[1] It was published in 1981, following Tolkien's major works The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion. The Atlas includes many detailed maps of the lands described in those books. A revised and updated second edition was published in 1991, after publication of eight volumes of The History of Middle-earth, edited by Christopher Tolkien after his father's death. A reissue edition was published in 2001. The maps are treated as if they are of real landscapes, drawn according to the rules of a real atlas. For each area the history of the land is taken into account, as well as geography on a larger scale and from there maps are drawn
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Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
(/ˈhoʊtən ˈmɪflɪn ˈhɑːrkɔːrt/[7]) (HMH) is an educational and trade publisher in the United States. Headquartered in Boston's Financial District, it publishes textbooks, instructional technology materials, assessments, reference works, and fiction and non-fiction for both young readers and adults.Contents1 History1.1 Creation of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt1.1.1 Vivendi purchase 1.1.2
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Christopher Tolkien
Christopher John Reuel Tolkien (born 21 November 1924) is the third son of the author J. R. R. Tolkien
J. R. R. Tolkien
(1892–1973), and the editor of much of his father's posthumously published work. He drew the original maps for his father's The Lord of the Rings, which he signed C. J. R. T.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Editorial work on J. R. R. Tolkien's manuscripts 2.2 Reaction to filmed versions of J. R. R. Tolkien's works3 Personal life 4 Bibliography 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Christopher Tolkien was born in Leeds, the third and youngest son of John Ronald Reuel Tolkien and his wife, Edith Mary Tolkien (née Bratt)
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Realms Of Arda
This is a list of the known realms of Arda in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium. Major locations within realms, if any, are listed under each
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Angband (band)
Angband is a Persian/ American power metal/progressive musical group,[1] formed in 2004 in Tehran.Contents1 Band history 2 Music history2.1 2009-10 2.2 2011-12 2.3 20173 Musical Style 4 Discography4.1 Albums 4.2 Videos5 Members 6 References 7 External linksBand history[edit] Angband was formed in 2004 in Tehran
Tehran
by Mahyar Dean, a classically trained musician and author who is known for writing books about the bands Death and Testament.[2] Angband was originally conceived as a progressive metal/instrumental project, but with the inclusion of singer Ashkan Yazdani they headed in a more power metal/progressive metal vein.[2] Once Ramin Rahimi joined the band as drummer, the band was able to record their first full-length album, which was titled Rising from Apadana. Mahyar Dean played the bass parts as well as the guitars but shortly after the album was released, M
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Dorthonion
In the fantasy world of J. R. R. Tolkien's Middle-earth, Dorthonion ("Land of Pines"), poetically Orod-na-Thôn ("Mountain under Pine"), was a highland region of the First Age, lying immediately to the north of Beleriand, and south of the plains of Ard-galen
Ard-galen
(later Anfauglith) that extended north to Morgoth's stronghold of Thangorodrim
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Gondolin
Gondolin[1] is a fictional city in J. R. R. Tolkien's legendarium, inhabited by Elves. Found and founded with divine inspiration, it is hidden by mountains and endures for centuries before being betrayed and destroyed. It was the mightiest of the elven homes in the Hither Lands [2] The city was famed for its walls, and had possible parallels to Troy
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.