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Andrew Lang
Andrew Lang
Andrew Lang
(31 March 1844 – 20 July 1912) was a Scottish poet, novelist, literary critic, and contributor to the field of anthropology. He is best known as a collector of folk and fairy tales. The Andrew Lang
Andrew Lang
lectures at the University of St Andrews
University of St Andrews
are named after him.Contents1 Biography 2 Scholarship2.1 Folklore
Folklore
and anthropology 2.2 Psychical research 2.3 Classical scholarship 2.4 Historian 2.5 Other writings3 Works3.1 To 1884 3.2 1885–1889 3.3 1890–1899 3.4 1900–1909 3.5 1910–1912 3.6 Posthumous 3.7 Andrew Lang's Fairy Books4 References 5 Relevant literature 6 External linksBiography[edit] Lang was born in Selkirk
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Robert Burns
Robert Burns
Robert Burns
(25 January 1759 – 21 July 1796), also known as Rabbie Burns, the Bard of Ayrshire, Ploughman Poet and various other names and epithets,[nb 1] was a Scottish poet and lyricist. He is widely regarded as the national poet of Scotland and is celebrated worldwide. He is the best known of the poets who have written in the Scots language, although much of his writing is also in English and a light Scots dialect, accessible to an audience beyond Scotland. He also wrote in standard English, and in these writings his political or civil commentary is often at its bluntest. He is regarded as a pioneer of the Romantic movement, and after his death he became a great source of inspiration to the founders of both liberalism and socialism, and a cultural icon in Scotland and among the Scottish diaspora
Scottish diaspora
around the world
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Homeric Scholarship
Homeric scholarship
Homeric scholarship
is the study of any Homeric topic, especially the two large surviving epics, the Iliad
Iliad
and Odyssey. It is currently part of the academic discipline of classical studies. The subject is one of the oldest in scholarship
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Kincardineshire
Kincardineshire, also known as the Mearns (from Scottish Gaelic: A' Mhaoirne meaning "the Stewartry"), is a historic county, registration county and lieutenancy area on the coast of northeast Scotland. It is bounded by Aberdeenshire on the north and west, and by Angus on the south. The name "Kincardine" is also used in Kincardine and Mearns, a committee area of the Aberdeenshire Council, although this covers a smaller area than the county.Contents1 History 2 Structures and sites 3 Coat of arms 4 Constituency 5 Historic transport routes 6 Notable people 7 Natural features 8 See also 9 References 10 External linksHistory[edit]Map of Scotland showing roughly the historic district of the Mearns (Gowrie is shown wider, and further to the east, than it should be; Angus actually reached the border with Marr)Anciently, the area was the Province of Mearns, bordered on the north by Marr, and on the west by Angus
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Mythology
Mythology
Mythology
refers variously to the collected myths of a group of people[1] or to the study of such myths.[2] A folklore genre, myth is a feature of every culture. Many sources for myths have been proposed, ranging from personification of nature or personification of natural phenomena, to truthful or hyperbolic accounts of historical events to explanations of existing rituals. A culture's collective mythology helps convey belonging, shared and religious experiences, behavioral models, and moral and practical lessons. The study of myth began in ancient history. Rival classes of the Greek myths by Euhemerus, Plato
Plato
and Sallustius were developed by the Neoplatonists
Neoplatonists
and later revived by Renaissance
Renaissance
mythographers
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Religion
There is no scholarly consensus over what precisely constitutes a religion.[1][2] It may be defined as a cultural system of designated behaviors and practices, world views, texts, sanctified places, prophesies, ethics, or organizations, that relate humanity to the supernatural, transcendental, or spiritual. Different religions may or may not contain various elements ranging from the divine,[3] sacred things,[4] faith,[5] a supernatural being or supernatural beings[6] or "some sort of ultimacy and transcendence that will provide norms and power for the rest of life".[7] Religious practices may include rituals, sermons, commemoration or veneration (of deities), sacrifices, festivals, feasts, trances, initiations, funerary services, matrimonial services, meditation, prayer, music, art, dance, public service, or other aspects of human culture. Religions have sacred histories and narratives, which may be preserved in sacred scriptures, and symbols and holy places, that aim mostly to give a
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Noble Savage
A noble savage is a literary stock character who embodies the concept of the indigene, outsider, wild human, an "other" who has not been "corrupted" by civilization, and therefore symbolizes humanity's innate goodness. In English, the phrase first appeared in the 17th century in John Dryden's heroic play The Conquest of Granada
The Conquest of Granada
(1672), wherein it was used in reference to newly created man. "Savage" at that time could mean "wild beast" as well as "wild man".[2] The phrase later became identified with the idealized picture of "nature's gentleman", which was an aspect of 18th-century sentimentalism
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Parapsychology
Parapsychology
Parapsychology
is a field of study concerned with the investigation of paranormal and psychic phenomena which include telepathy, precognition, clairvoyance, psychokinesis, near-death experiences, reincarnation, apparitional experiences, and other paranormal claims. It is identified as pseudoscience by a vast majority of mainstream scientists.[1][2] Parapsychology
Parapsychology
research is largely conducted by private institutions in several countries and funded through private donations,[3] and the subject rarely appears in mainstream science journals
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Homer
Homer
Homer
(/ˈhoʊmər/; Greek: Ὅμηρος [hómɛːros], Hómēros) is the name ascribed by the ancient Greeks to the legendary author of the Iliad
Iliad
and the Odyssey, two epic poems which are the central works of ancient Greek literature. The Iliad
Iliad
is set during the Trojan War, the ten-year siege of the city of Troy
Troy
by a coalition of Greek kingdoms. It focuses on a quarrel between King Agamemnon
Agamemnon
and the warrior Achilles
Achilles
lasting a few weeks during the last year of the war. The Odyssey
Odyssey
focuses on the journey home of Odysseus, king of Ithaca, after the fall of Troy. Many accounts of Homer's life circulated in classical antiquity, the most widespread being that he was a blind bard from Ionia, a region of central coastal Anatolia
Anatolia
in present-day Turkey
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Mary, Queen Of Scots
Mary, Queen of Scots
Mary, Queen of Scots
(8 December 1542 – 8 February 1587), also known as Mary Stuart[3] or Mary I, reigned over Scotland from 14 December 1542 to 24 July 1567. Mary, the only surviving legitimate child of King James V, was six days old when her father died and she acceded to the throne. She spent most of her childhood in France while Scotland was ruled by regents, and in 1558, she married the Dauphin of France, Francis. He ascended the French throne as King Francis II in 1559, and Mary briefly became queen consort of France, until his death in December 1560. Widowed, Mary returned to Scotland, arriving in Leith
Leith
on 19 August 1561. Four years later, she married her first cousin, Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, but their union was unhappy
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Fellow Of The British Academy
Fellowship of the British Academy
British Academy
(FBA) is an award granted by the British Academy
British Academy
to leading academics for their distinction[1] in the humanities and social sciences.[2] There are three kinds of fellowship[3]Fellows, for scholars resident in the United Kingdom Corresponding Fellows, for scholars not resident in the UK Honorary Fellows, an honorary academic titleThe award of fellowship is evidenced by published work and fellows may use the post-nominal letters: FBA. Examples of fellows include Mary Beard, Nicholas Stern, Baron Stern of Brentford
Nicholas Stern, Baron Stern of Brentford
and Rowan Williams. See also[edit]List of Fellows of the British AcademyReferences[edit]^ "The British Academy
British Academy
welcomes new Fellows for 2015 University of Cambridge". Cam.ac.uk. 2015-07-16. Retrieved 2016-12-10.  ^ "Fellows British Academy"
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University Of Cambridge
The University of Cambridge
Cambridge
(informally Cambridge
Cambridge
University)[note 1] is a collegiate public research university in Cambridge, England. Founded in 1209 and granted a royal charter by King Henry III in 1231, Cambridge
Cambridge
is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and the world's fourth-oldest surviving university.[8] The university grew out of an association of scholars who left the University of Oxford
University of Oxford
after a dispute with the townspeople.[9] The two medieval universities share many common features and are often referred to jointly as "Oxbridge"
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James VI Of Scotland
James VI and I
James VI and I
(James Charles Stuart; 19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scotland
King of Scotland
as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death in 1625. The kingdoms of Scotland and England were individual sovereign states, with their own parliaments, judiciaries, and laws, though both were ruled by James in personal union. James was the son of Mary, Queen of Scots, and a great-great-grandson of Henry VII, King of England
King of England
and Lord of Ireland, positioning him to eventually accede to all three thrones. James succeeded to the Scottish throne at the age of thirteen months, after his mother was compelled to abdicate in his favour
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John Knox
John Knox
John Knox
(c. 1513 – 24 November 1572) was a Scottish minister, theologian, and writer who was a leader of the country's Reformation. He is the founder of the Presbyterian Church of Scotland. Born in Giffordgate, Knox is believed to have been educated at the University of St Andrews
University of St Andrews
and worked as a notary-priest. Influenced by early church reformers such as George Wishart, he joined the movement to reform the Scottish church. He was caught up in the ecclesiastical and political events that involved the murder of Cardinal David Beaton in 1546 and the intervention of the regent of Scotland
Scotland
Mary of Guise, a French noblewoman
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Charles Edward Stuart
Charles Edward Louis John Casimir Sylvester Severino Maria Stuart (31 December 1720 – 31 January 1788) was the elder son of James Francis Edward Stuart, grandson of James II and VII
James II and VII
and after 1766 the Stuart claimant to the throne of Great Britain. During his lifetime, he was also known as "The Young Pretender" or "The Young Chevalier" and in popular memory as "Bonnie Prince Charlie". He is best remembered for his role in the 1745 rising; defeat at Culloden in April 1746 effectively ended the Stuart cause and subsequent attempts such as a planned French invasion in 1759 failed to materialise.[2] His escape from Scotland after the uprising led him to be portrayed as a romantic figure of heroic failure in later representations.[3]Contents1 Early life 2 The "Forty-Five" 3 Later life 4 Death and burial 5 Arms 6 Ancestry 7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEarly life[edit]"Prince Charles Edward Stuart, 1720 - 1788
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