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Andrew Colvile
Andrew Colvile or Colville (born Wedderburn; 6 November 1779 – 3 February 1856) was a Scottish businessman, notable as the governor of the Hudson's Bay Company, a huge organisation set up for the North American fur trade but also instrumental in the early history of Canada. He was also chairman of the West India Docks.[2]Contents1 Family background 2 Career 3 Family 4 Legacy 5 References 6 External linksFamily background[edit] His grandfather, Sir John Wedderburn, 5th Baronet of Blackness, was involved with the Jacobite rising of 1745
Jacobite rising of 1745
and was convicted of treason. The punishment for this was threefold: the death penalty, the confiscation of all his estates (he had property at Inveresk), and the attainting of his family, including the baronetcy. At least two of his sons moved to Jamaica, including Andrew's uncle and father
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Andrew Colville (writer)
Andrew Colville is an American screenwriter. He has worked on the AMC drama Mad Men, for which he won a Writers Guild of America (WGA) Award. Following that he was a writer on the critically acclaimed but short-lived Fox TV series Lone Star. After the cancellation of Lone Star, he became a writer and co-producer on the first season of The CW action series Nikita (2010–11), and served as a writer/producer in its second season (2011–12). He then became a writer/producer on the first season of the USA Network series Graceland in 2013. He is currently a writer and executive producer on the AMC drama series Turn: Washington's Spies, a fictionalized account of the Culper Spy Ring masterminded by General George Washington during the American Revolutionary War. Biography[edit] Colville joined the crew of AMC drama Mad Men for the third season in 2009. He co-wrote the episode "The Arrangements" with series creator and show runner Matthew Weiner
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Frederic Rogers, 1st Baron Blachford
Frederic Rogers, 1st Baron Blachford GCMG PC (31 January 1811 – 21 November 1889) was a British civil servant, styled as Sir Frederick Rogers, 8th Baronet from 1851 to 1871. Biography[edit] He was born in London and educated at Eton and Oriel College, Oxford, where he had a brilliant career, winning the Craven University scholarship, and taking a double first-class in classics and mathematics. He became a fellow of Oriel College in 1833, and won the Vinerian Scholarship (1834), and fellowship (1840). He was called to the bar in 1837, but never practised.[1] At school and at Oxford he was a contemporary of William Ewart Gladstone, and at Oxford he began a lifelong friendship with J. H. Newman and R. W
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Abolitionist
Abolitionism
Abolitionism
is a general term which describes the movement to end slavery. This term can be used formally or informally. In Western Europe and the Americas, abolitionism is a historical movement in effort to end the African and Indian slave trade and set slaves free. King Charles I of Spain, usually known as Emperor Charles V, was following the example of Louis X of France
Louis X of France
who abolished slavery within the Kingdom of France
Kingdom of France
in 1315. He passed a law which would have abolished colonial slavery in 1542, although this law was not passed in the largest colonial states, and was not enforced. In the late 17th century, the Roman Catholic Church, taking up a plea by Lourenço da Silva de Mendouça, officially condemned the slave trade, which was affirmed vehemently by Pope Gregory XVI
Pope Gregory XVI
in 1839
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William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland
William Eden, 1st Baron Auckland, PC (Ire), FRS (3 April 1745 – 28 May 1814) was a British diplomat and politician who sat in the British House of Commons
British House of Commons
from 1774 to 1793 . The subantarctic Auckland Islands group to the south of New Zealand, discovered in 1806, were named after him.Contents1 Background and education 2 Political career 3 Family 4 References 5 External linksBackground and education[edit] A member of the influential Eden family, Auckland was a younger son of Sir Robert Eden, 3rd Baronet, of Windlestone Hall, County Durham, and Mary, daughter of William Davison. His brothers included Sir Robert Eden, 1st Baronet, of Maryland, Governor of Maryland, and Morton Eden, 1st Baron Henley
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James William Colvile
Sir James William Colvile (12 January 1810 – 6 December 1880) was a British lawyer, civil servant and then judge in India, and a judge on the Judicial Committee of the Privy Council, the court of last resort for the British colonies.Contents1 Life 2 Family 3 References 4 External linksLife[edit] He was born the eldest son of Andrew Wedderburn Colvile of Ochiltree and Crombie, Fife and educated at Eton College
Eton College
and Trinity College, Cambridge, where he graduated MA in 1834. He trained as a barrister and was called to the bar in 1835.[1] He practised at Lincoln's Inn
Lincoln's Inn
for ten years before being appointed Advocate General to the East India Company
East India Company
in 1845. He went to Calcutta and was appointed Puisne Judge to the Supreme Court of Bengal in 1848 and Chief Justice of Bengal
Chief Justice of Bengal
in 1855
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Judicial Committee Of The Privy Council
The Judicial Committee of the Privy Council
Judicial Committee of the Privy Council
(JCPC) is the highest court of appeal for certain Commonwealth countries
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Court Of Last Resort
A supreme court is the highest court within the hierarchy of courts in many legal jurisdictions. Other descriptions for such courts include court of last resort, apex court, and highest (or final) court of appeal. Broadly speaking, the decisions of a supreme court are not subject to further review by any other court. Supreme courts typically function primarily as appellate courts, hearing appeals from decisions of lower trial courts, or from intermediate-level appellate courts.[1] However, not all highest courts are named as such. Civil law states tend not to have a single highest court. Additionally, the highest court in some jurisdictions is not named the "Supreme Court", for example, the High Court
Court
of Australia; this is because decisions by the High Court
Court
could formerly be appealed to the Privy Council
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Francis Marindin
Marindin may refer to: Francis Marindin (1838–1900), a colonel that served with the Royal Engineers USC&GS Marindin, a launch that served as a survey ship in the United States Coast and Geodetic Survey from 1919 to 1944This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Marindin. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the
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Rupert's Land
Flag of the Hudson's Bay CompanyRupert's Land, showing location of York FactoryGovernment Trading companyMonarch •  1670–1685 (first) Charles II •  1837–1870 (last) VictoriaHBC Governor •  1670–1682 (first) Prince Rupert of the Rhine •  1870 (last) Stafford NorthcoteHistorical era Age of Discovery •  Established 1670 •  Disestablished July 15, 1870Today part of  Canada  United StatesRupert's Land, or Prince Rupert's Land, was a territory in British North America
North America
comprising the Hudson Bay
Hudson Bay
drainage basin, a territory in which a commercial monopoly was operated by the Hudson's Bay Company for 200 years from 1670 to 1870. The area once known as Rupert's Land is now mainly a part of Canada, but a small portion is now in the United States
United States
of America
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Mandarin (bureaucrat)
A mandarin (Chinese: 官 guān) was a bureaucrat scholar in the government of imperial China and Vietnam. The term is generally applied to the officials appointed through the imperial examination system; it sometimes includes and sometimes excludes the eunuchs also involved in the governance of the two realms.Contents1 History and use of the term 2 History 3 Ranks under the Qing dynasty 4 Figurative meaning 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory and use of the term[edit] The English term comes from the Portuguese mandarim (spelled in Old Portuguese as mandarin pronounced [ˌmɐ̃n.ðaˈɾĩn]). The Portuguese word is amply attested already in one of the earliest Portuguese reports about China: letters from the imprisoned survivors of the Tomé Pires' embassy, which were most likely written in 1524,[1] and in Castanheda's História do descobrimento e conquista da Índia pelos portugueses (c
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Andrew Galbraith Colville
Andrew Colville (17 December 1846 - 17 April 1881) was a Scottish international rugby union player who played for Merchistons in Edinburgh. Born in Edinburgh in 1848, Colville played as a Forward. Colville played in the first ever rugby union international match for Scotland against England in 27 March 1871[1] He was selected again in the return match the following year. On 5 February 1872 he played for Scotland against England at The Oval.[2] References[edit]^ "ESPN"
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Whitehall
Whitehall
Whitehall
is a road in the City of Westminster, Central London, which forms the first part of the A3212 road
A3212 road
from Trafalgar Square
Trafalgar Square
to Chelsea. It is the main thoroughfare running south from Trafalgar Square towards Parliament Square. The street is recognised as the centre of the Government of the United Kingdom
Government of the United Kingdom
and is lined with numerous departments and ministries, including the Ministry of Defence, Horse Guards and the Cabinet Office
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Charles Kegan Paul
Charles Kegan Paul
Charles Kegan Paul
(1828 – 19 July 1902) was an English publisher and author.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Family 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Paul was born at White Lackington, Somerset, and was educated at Eton and at Exeter College, Oxford. He became curate at Great Tew
Great Tew
in 1851. From 1853 to 1862 he was a master at Eton. After twelve years as vicar of Sturminster Marshall
Sturminster Marshall
from 1862 to 1874, he entered the publishing business in London, from which he retired in 1899. Kegan Paul's business was continued by Kegan Paul, Trench, Trübner & Co. which merged with George Routledge
Routledge
in 1912. He left the Church of England
England
for Positivism, and in his last years entered the Roman Catholic Church
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Eden Paul
Maurice Eden Paul (27 September 1865 – 1 December 1944) was a British socialist physician, writer and translator.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 Later years 3 Works 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] Paul was the younger son of the publisher Charles Kegan Paul,[2] and Margaret Colvile. His mother was one of 12 daughters born to Andrew Wedderburn-Colvile (1779–1856) and the Hon
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Fort Colvile
Coordinates: 48°37′42″N 118°5′31″W / 48.62833°N 118.09194°W / 48.62833; -118.09194Fort ColvileFur Trade OutpostIndian camp at Fort Colvile by Paul Kane.Constructed: 1825Company built: Hudson's Bay CompanyLocation: Kettle Falls, WashingtonContinent: North AmericaLater Ownership: noneAbandoned: 1870The trade center Fort Colvile (also Fort Colville) was built by the Hudson's Bay Company (HBC) at Kettle Falls on the Columbia River in 1825 and operated in the Columbia fur district of the company. Named for Andrew Colville,[1] a London governor of the HBC, the fort was a few miles west of the present site of Colville, Washington. It was an important stop on the York Factory Express trade route to London via the Hudson Bay
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