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André (play)
André; a Tragedy in Five Acts is a play by William Dunlap, first produced at the Park Theatre in New York City
New York City
on March 30, 1798, by the Old American Company, published in that same year together with a collection of historic documents relating to the case of the title character, Major John André, the British officer who was hanged as a spy on October 2, 1780, for his role in the treason of Benedict Arnold. The play does not go into the historic details, but rather presents a fictionalized account of the American debate over whether to spare or hang him
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Park Theatre (Manhattan)
The Park Theatre, originally known as the New Theatre, was a playhouse in New York City, located at 21, 23, and 25 Park Row, about 200 feet (61 m) east of Ann Street and backing Theatre Alley. The location, at the north end of the city, overlooked the park that would soon house City Hall. French architect Marc Isambard Brunel collaborated with fellow émigré Joseph-François Mangin
Joseph-François Mangin
and his brother Charles on the design of the building in the 1790s. Construction costs mounted to precipitous levels, and changes were made in the design; the resulting theatre had a rather plain exterior. The doors opened in January 1798. In its early years, the Park enjoyed little to no competition in New York City. Nevertheless, it rarely made a profit for its owners or managers, prompting them to sell it in 1805
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New York City
Bronx, Kings (Brooklyn), New York (Manhattan), Queens, Richmond (Staten Island)Historic colonies New Netherland Province of New YorkSettled 1624Consolidated 1898Named for James, Duke of YorkGovernment[2] • Type Mayor–Council • Body New York City
New York City
Council • Mayor Bill de Blasio
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Old American Company
The Hallam Company, which later became the American Company and then the Old American Company,[citation needed] was the first fully professional theatre company to perform in North America.[1] The company was organised by William Hallam, former proprietor of the New Wells Theatre in London, and was led by his brother Lewis Hallam. Their company consisted of 12 adults and 3 children, drawn from English actors of "modest accomplishment". They arrived by the vessel Charming Sally at Yorktown, Virginia, on 2 June 1752, and made their early performances in nearby Williamsburg. Their first performance, The Merchant of Venice, is generally considered to be the first professional staging of Shakespeare in America.[2] In 1753 the Hallam company moved to New York, and in 1754 they played in Philadelphia and in Charleston, South Carolina. In 1755 the company moved to the West Indies, and merged with the company of David Douglass. On Lewis' death, Douglass married his widow
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Benedict Arnold
American Revolutionary War
American Revolutionary War
Continental Army:Capture of Fort Ticonderoga Arnold's expedition to Quebec Battle of Quebec Battle of The Cedars Battle of Valcour Island Battle of Ridgefield Relief of Fort Stanwix Battles of SaratogaBritish ArmyRaid of Richmond Battle of Blandford Battle of Groton HeightsAwards Boot MonumentSpouse(s)Margaret Mansfield (m. 1767; d. 1775) Peggy Shippen
Peggy Shippen
(m. 1779)SignatureDedication plaque on monument in Groton, CT
Groton, CT
to victims of Arnold's attack on Fort Griswold:This monument was erected under the patronage of the State of Connecticut in the 55th year of the Independence of the U.S.A. in memory of the brave patriots massacred at Fort Griswold
Fort Griswold
near this spot on the 6th of Sept
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George Washington
American Revolution Commander in Chief of the Continental ArmyValley Forge Battle of Trenton Mount Vernon
Mount Vernon
Conference 1787 Constitutional ConventionPresident of the United States PresidencyFirst term1788–89 election 1st inaugurationJudiciary Act Whiskey RebellionThanksgiving Presidential title Coinage Act Residence ActDistrict of ColumbiaSecond term1792 election 2nd inauguration Neutrality Act Jay TreatyJudicial appointments Farewell AddressLegacyLegacy Monuments Depictions Slavery Papers Library Bibliographyv t e George Washington
George Washington
(February 22, 1732[b][c] – December 14, 1799) was an American statesman and soldier who served as the first President of the United States
President of the United States
from 1789 to 1797 and was one of the Founding Fathers of the United States
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Honora Sneyd
Honora Edgeworth (née Sneyd;[b] 1751 – 1 May 1780) was an eighteenth-century English writer, mainly known for her associations with literary figures of the day particularly Anna Seward
Anna Seward
and the Lunar Society, and for her work on children's education. Sneyd was born in Bath in 1751, and following the death of her mother in 1756 was raised by Canon Thomas Seward
Thomas Seward
and his wife Elizabeth in Lichfield, Staffordshire
Staffordshire
until she returned to her father's house in 1771. There, she formed a close friendship with their daughter, Anna Seward. Having had a romantic engagement to John André
John André
and having declined the hand of Thomas Day, she married Richard Edgeworth
Richard Edgeworth
as his second wife in 1773, living on the family estate in Ireland
Ireland
till 1776
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Cockade
A cockade is a knot of ribbons, or other circular- or oval-shaped symbol of distinctive colors which is usually worn on a hat.Contents1 Eighteenth century 2 Cockades of the Confederate States 3 Cockades of the European military 4 List of national cockades 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksEighteenth century[edit] In the 18th and 19th centuries, coloured cockades were used in Europe to show the allegiance of their wearers to some political faction, their rank, or as part of a servant's livery.[1][2] Military uniforms would use cockades as well. A cockade was pinned on the side of a man's tricorne or cocked hat, or on his lapel
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Patriot (American Revolution)
Patriots (also known as Revolutionaries, Continentals, Rebels, or American Whigs) were those colonists of the Thirteen Colonies
Thirteen Colonies
who rebelled against British control during the American Revolution
American Revolution
and in July 1776 declared the United States of America an independent nation. Their rebellion was based on the political philosophy of republicanism, as expressed by spokesmen such as Thomas Jefferson, John Adams
John Adams
and Thomas Paine. They were opposed by the Loyalists who instead supported continued British rule. As a group, Patriots represented a wide array of social, economic and ethnic backgrounds
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French Revolution
The French Revolution
Revolution
(French: Révolution française [ʁevɔlysjɔ̃ fʁɑ̃sɛːz]) was a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France
France
and its colonies that lasted from 1789 until 1799. It was partially carried forward by Napoleon
Napoleon
during the later expansion of the French Empire. The Revolution
Revolution
overthrew the monarchy, established a republic, catalyzed violent periods of political turmoil, and finally culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon
Napoleon
who brought many of its principles to areas he conquered in Western Europe and beyond
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American Revolutionary War
Allied victory:Peace of Paris British recognition of American independence End of the First British Empire British retention of Canada
Canada
and GibraltarTerritorial changesGreat Britain cedes to the United States
United States
the area east of the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
and south of the Great Lakes
Great Lakes
and St
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Populism
Populism
Populism
is a political philosophy supporting the rights and power of the people in their struggle against a privileged elite.[1] Critics of populism have described it as a political approach that seeks to disrupt the existing social order by solidifying and mobilizing the animosity of the "commoner" or "the people" against "privileged elites" and the "establishment".[2] Populists can fall anywhere on the traditional left–right political spectrum of politics and often portray both bourgeois capitalists and socialist organizers as unfairly dominating the political sphere.[3] Political parties and politicians[4] often use the terms "populist" and "populism" as pejoratives against their opponents
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
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John André
John André
John André
(2 May 1750 – 2 October 1780) was a British Army
British Army
officer hanged as a spy by the Continental Army
Continental Army
during the American Revolutionary War for assisting Benedict Arnold's attempted surrender of the fort at West Point, New York
West Point, New York
to the British.Contents1 Early life 2 Intelligence work, capture and execution2.1 Intelligence officer 2.2 Taken into custody 2.3 Trial and execution2.3.1 Eyewitness account3 Aftermath 4 In popular culture 5 See also 6 Notes 7 Bibliography 8 Further reading 9 External linksEarly life[edit]This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
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William Dunlap
William Dunlap
William Dunlap
(February 19, 1766 – September 28, 1839) was a pioneer of American theater. He was a producer, playwright, and actor, as well as a historian. He managed two of New York City's earliest and most prominent theaters, the John Street Theatre (from 1796–98) and the Park Theatre (from 1798–1805). He was also an artist, despite losing an eye in childhood. He was born in Perth Amboy, New Jersey, the son of an army officer wounded at the Battle of Quebec in 1759. In 1783, he produced a portrait of George Washington, now owned by the United States Senate, and later studied art under Benjamin West
Benjamin West
in London;[1] another teacher was Abraham Delanoy, with whom he had a handful of lessons in New York.[2] After returning to America in 1787, he worked exclusively in the theater for 18 years, resuming painting out of economic necessity in 1805
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