HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Ancient West Africa
The history of West Africa
West Africa
began with the first human settlements around 4,000 BCE. It has been commonly divided into its prehistory, the Iron Age in Africa, the major polities flourishing, the colonial period, and finally the post-independence era, in which the current nations were formed. West Africa
West Africa
is west of an imagined north-south axis lying close to 10° east longitude, bordered by the Atlantic Ocean and Sahara
Sahara
Desert. Colonial boundaries are reflected in the modern boundaries between contemporary West African states, cutting across ethnic and cultural lines, often dividing single ethnic groups between two or more states. Early human settlers arrived in West Africa
West Africa
around 12,000 BCE. In the fifth millennium, as the ancestors of modern West Africans began entering the area, the development of sedentary farming began to take place in West Africa
[...More...]

"Ancient West Africa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

West Africa
West
West
Africa, also called Western Africa
Africa
and the West
West
of Africa, is the westernmost region of Africa
[...More...]

"West Africa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Scramble For Africa
The Scramble for Africa was the occupation, division, and colonisation of African territory by European powers during the period of New Imperialism, between 1881 and 1914. It is also called the Partition of Africa
Africa
and by some the Conquest of Africa
[...More...]

"Scramble For Africa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Sikasso
Sikasso
Sikasso
is a city in the south of Mali
Mali
and the capital of the Sikasso Cercle and the Sikasso
Sikasso
Region. It is Mali's second largest city with 225,753 residents in the 2009 census.Contents1 Geography 2 History 3 Climate 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksGeography[edit] Located 375 kilometres (233 mi) southeast of Bamako, 100 kilometres (62 mi) north of Côte d'Ivoire, and 45 kilometres (28 mi) west of Burkina Faso, Sikasso
Sikasso
acts as a crossroads between the coastal countries (Togo, Bénin, Ghana, Côte d'Ivoire) and the landlocked Mali
Mali
and Burkina Faso. Sikasso's ethnic groups include the Senufo Bamana,(mainly the Supyire), the Bobo (or Bobo Fing, lit. 'black Bobo'), and the Minianka
Minianka
(Mamara Senufo). Sikasso
Sikasso
has abundant agriculture
[...More...]

"Sikasso" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

African Slave Trade
Slavery
Slavery
has historically been widespread in Africa, and still continues today in some countries. Systems of servitude and slavery were common in parts of Africa, as they were in much of the ancient world. In many African societies where slavery was prevalent, the enslaved people were not treated as chattel slaves and were given certain rights in a system similar to indentured servitude elsewhere in the world
[...More...]

"African Slave Trade" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Christopher Columbus
Christopher Columbus[a] (/kəˈlʌmbəs/[3] c. 31 October 1451 – 20 May 1506) was an Italian explorer, navigator, and colonizer. Born in the Republic of Genoa,[4] under the auspices of the Catholic Monarchs
Catholic Monarchs
of Spain
Spain
he completed four voyages across the Atlantic Ocean. Those voyages and his efforts to establish settlements on the island of Hispaniola, initiated the permanent European colonization of the New World. At a time when European kingdoms were beginning to establish new trade routes and colonies, motivated by imperialism and economic competition, Columbus proposed to reach the East Indies
East Indies
(South and Southeast Asia) by sailing westward. This eventually received the support of the Spanish Crown, which saw a chance to enter the spice trade with Asia
Asia
through this new route
[...More...]

"Christopher Columbus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fulani
The Fula people
Fula people
or Fulani or Fulany or Fulɓe (Fula: Fulɓe; French: Peul; Hausa: Fulani or Hilani; Portuguese: Fula; Wolof: Pël; Bambara: Fulaw), numbering between 20 and 25 million people in total,[10] are one of the largest ethnic groups in the Sahel
Sahel
and West Africa, widely dispersed across the region.[11] The Fula people
Fula people
are traditionally believed to have roots stemming from North Africa
North Africa
and the Middle East, who later intermingled with local West African ethnic groups
[...More...]

"Fulani" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fouta Djallon
Fouta Djallon
Fouta Djallon
is a highland region in the centre of Guinea, a country in West Africa. The indigenous name in the Pular language is Fuuta-Jaloo.[a] The origin of the name is from the Pular word for the region plus the name of the original inhabitants, the Yalunka or Jalonke (French: Djallonké).Contents1 Geography 2 Population 3 History 4 Economy 5 Rural economy 6 Biointensive agriculture 7 Urban 8 Out-migration 9 Notes 10 References 11 Sources11.1 Further reading12 External linksGeography[edit] Fouta-Djallon consists mainly of rolling grasslands, at an average elevation of about 900 m (3,000 ft). The highest point, Mount Loura, rises to 1,515 m (4,970 ft). The plateau consists of thick sandstone formations which overlie granitic basement rock. Erosion
Erosion
by rain and rivers has carved deep jungle canyons and valleys into the sandstone
[...More...]

"Fouta Djallon" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Jihad
Jihad
Jihad
(English: /dʒɪˈhɑːd/; Arabic: جهاد‎ jihād [dʒɪˈhaːd]) is an Arabic
Arabic
word which literally means striving or struggling, especially with a praiseworthy aim.[1][2][3][4] It can have many shades of meaning in an Islamic context, such as struggle against one's evil inclinations, an exertion to conve
[...More...]

"Jihad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Animist
Animism
Animism
(from Latin
Latin
anima, "breath, spirit, life")[1][2] is the religious belief that objects, places and creatures all possess a distinct spiritual essence.[3][4][5][6] Potentially, animism perceives all things—animals, plants, rocks, rivers, weather systems, human handiwork and perhaps even words—as animated and alive. Animism
Animism
is used in the anthropology of religion as a term for the belief system of many indigenous peoples,[7] especially in contrast to the relatively more recent development of organised religions.[8] Although each culture has its own different mythologies and rituals, "animism" is said to describe the most common, foundational thread of indigenous peoples' "spiritual" or "supernatural" perspectives
[...More...]

"Animist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mande Languages
The Mande languages are spoken in several countries in Africa
Africa
by the Mandé
Mandé
people and include Maninka, Mandinka, Soninke, Bambara, Dioula, Bozo, Mende, Susu, and Vai. There are millions of speakers, chiefly in Burkina Faso, Mali, Senegal, the Gambia, Guinea, Guinea-Bissau, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Ivory Coast. The Mande languages have traditionally been considered a divergent branch of the Niger–Congo family, but that has always been controversial. The group was first recognized in 1854 by Sigismund Wilhelm Koelle, in his Polyglotta Africana. He mentioned 13 languages under the heading North-Western High-Sudan Family, or Mandéga Family of Languages. In 1901, Maurice Delafosse
Maurice Delafosse
made a distinction of two groups in his Essai de manuel pratique de la langue mandé ou mandingue. He speaks of a northern group mandé-tan and a southern group mandé-fu
[...More...]

"Mande Languages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mungo Park (explorer)
Mungo Park (11 September 1771 – 1806) was a Scottish explorer of West Africa. He was the first Westerner known to have travelled to the central portion of the Niger River, and his account of his travels is still in print.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 First journey 3 Between journeys 4 Second journey4.1 Death 4.2 Aftermath5 Medal 6 In media 7 Works 8 See also 9 Notes 10 Sources 11 Further reading 12 External linksEarly life[edit] Mungo Park was born in Selkirkshire, Scotland, at Foulshiels on the Yarrow Water, near Selkirk, on a tenant farm which his father rented from the Duke of Buccleuch. He was the seventh in a family of thirteen.[2][3] Although tenant farmers, the Parks were relatively well-off
[...More...]

"Mungo Park (explorer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Pan-Africanism
Pan-Africanism
Pan-Africanism
is a worldwide intellectual movement that aims to encourage and strengthen bonds of solidarity between all people of African descent. Based upon a common fate going back to the Atlantic slave trade, the movement extends beyond continental Africans, with a substantial support base among the African diaspora in the Caribbean, Latin America and the United States.[1] It is based on the belief that unity is vital to economic, social, and political progress and aims to "unify and uplift" people of African descent.[2] The ideology asserts that the fate of all African peoples and countries are intertwined
[...More...]

"Pan-Africanism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kayes Region
Kayes
Kayes
Region is one of eight first level national subdivisions in Mali called “Regions”. It is the first administrative area of Mali
Mali
and covers an area of 120,760 square kilometres or 46,630 square miles. Its capital is the town of Kayes. The province was historically part of the Ghana Empire
Ghana Empire
and the Mali
Mali
Empire.Contents1 Geography 2 Cercles 3 History 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksGeography[edit] The region of Kayes
Kayes
is bordered to the north by Mauritania, to the west by Senegal, to the south by Guinea
Guinea
and to the east by the region of Koulikoro. In 2009 the region has a population of 1,996,812 inhabitants
[...More...]

"Kayes Region" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Kwame Nkrumah
Kwame Nkrumah
Kwame Nkrumah
PC (21 September 1909[a] – 27 April 1972) was a Ghanaian politician and revolutionary. He was the first prime minister and president of Ghana, having led it to independence from Britain in 1957. An influential advocate of Pan-Africanism, Nkrumah was a founding member of the Organization of African Unity
Organization of African Unity
and winner of the Lenin Peace Prize
Lenin Peace Prize
in 1962.[2] After twelve years abroad pursuing higher education, developing his political philosophy, and organizing with other diasporic pan-Africanists, Nkrumah returned to Gold Coast to begin his political career as an advocate of national independence. He formed the Convention People's Party, which achieved rapid success through its unprecedented appeal to the common voter
[...More...]

"Kwame Nkrumah" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Military Coup
A coup d'état (/ˌkuː deɪˈtɑː/ ( listen); French: [ku deta]), also known simply as a coup, a putsch (/pʊtʃ/), golpe de estado, or an overthrow, is a type of revolution, where the illegal and overt seizure of a state by the military or other elites within the state apparatus occurs.[1]Contents1 Terminology1.1 Etymology 1.2 Use of the phrase 1.3 Putsch 1.4 Pronunciamiento2 History 3 Types 4 Predictors 5 Coup-proofing 6 Democratization 7 Repression after failed coups, and counter-coups 8 International responses 9 Current leaders who assumed power via coups d'état 10 See also 11 References 12 Further reading 13 Bibliography 14 External linksTerminology[edit] Etymology[edit] Coup is when a country or a team attempt at taking something that is not theirs. The phrase coup d'état is French, literally meaning a "stroke of state" or "blow against the state"
[...More...]

"Military Coup" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.