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Ancash Region
Ancash (Quechua: Anqash) (Spanish: Áncash pronounced [ˈaŋkaʃ]) is a region of northern Peru. It is bordered by La Libertad Region
La Libertad Region
on the north, Huánuco and Pasco regions on the east, the Lima Region
Lima Region
on the south, and the Pacific Ocean on the west. Its capital is the city of Huaraz, and its largest city and port is Chimbote
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Sugarcane
Sugarcane, or sugar cane, are several species of tall perennial true grasses of the genus Saccharum, tribe Andropogoneae, native to the warm temperate to tropical regions of South Asia
South Asia
and Melanesia, and used for sugar production. It has stout, jointed, fibrous stalks that are rich in the sugar sucrose, which accumulates in the stalk internodes. The plant is two to six meters (six to twenty feet) tall. All sugar cane species interbreed and the major commercial cultivars are complex hybrids[1]. Sugarcane
Sugarcane
belongs to the grass family Poaceae, an economically important seed plant family that includes maize, wheat, rice, and sorghum, and many forage crops. Sucrose, extracted and purified in specialized mill factories, is used as raw material in the food industry or is fermented to produce ethanol. Ethanol
Ethanol
is produced on a large scale by the Brazilian sugarcane industry
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Humboldt Current
The Humboldt Current, also called the Peru
Peru
Current, is a cold, low-salinity ocean current that flows north along the western coast of South America.[1] It is an eastern boundary current flowing in the direction of the equator, and extends 500–1,000 km (310–620 mi) offshore. The Humboldt Current
Humboldt Current
is named after the Prussian naturalist Alexander von Humboldt
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Trough (geology)
In geology, a trough is a linear structural depression that extends laterally over a distance. Although it is less steep than a trench, a trough can be a narrow basin or a geologic rift. These features often form at the rim of tectonic plates. There are various oceanic troughs, troughs found under oceans; examples include:the Cayman Trough[1] the Nankai Trough the Rockall Trough
Rockall Trough
and others along the rift of the mid-oceanic ridge, the Suakin Trough[2] in the Red Sea the Timor Trough.[3]See also[edit]Walker LaneReferences[edit]^ Einsele, Gerhard (2000). Sedimentary Basins: Evolution, Facies, and Sediment Budget (2nd ed.). Springer. p. 630. ISBN 978-3-540-66193-1.  ^ Robert Dinwiddie: Ocean_ The World's Last Wilderness Revealed. Dorling Kindersley, London 2008, S. 452 ^ "Chapter II (Geology of Timor-Leste)". Atlas of mineral resources of the ESCAP region Volume 17 Geology and Mineral Resources of Timor-Leste (PDF)
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Pan-American Highway
The Pan-American Highway[1] is a network of roads measuring about 30,000 kilometres (19,000 mi)[2] in total length. Except for a rainforest break of approximately 160 km (100 mi), called the Darién Gap, the road links almost all of the Pacific coastal countries of the Americas
Americas
in a connected highway system. According to Guinness World Records, the Pan-American Highway
Pan-American Highway
is the world's longest "motorable road". However, because of the Darién Gap, it is not possible to cross between South America
South America
and Central America
Central America
with conventional highway vehicles
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Peruvian Anchoveta
The Peruvian anchoveta
Peruvian anchoveta
( Engraulis
Engraulis
ringens) is a species of fish of the anchovy family, Engraulidae, from the Southeast Pacific Ocean. It has yielded greater catches than any other single wild fish species in the world, with annual harvests varying between 4.2 and 8.3 million tonnes in 2008–2012.[2] Almost all of the production is used for the fishmeal industry. The Peruvian anchoveta
Peruvian anchoveta
may be the world's most abundant fish species.[3]Contents1 Distribution and ecology 2 Fisheries 3 Uses 4 Culinary aspects: Anchovy
Anchovy
vs
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Creek (tidal)
A tidal creek, tidal channel, or estuary is the portion of a stream that is affected by ebb and flow of ocean tides, in the case that the subject stream discharges to an ocean, sea or strait. Thus this portion of the stream has variable salinity and electrical conductivity over the tidal cycle. Due to the temporal variability of water quality parameters within the tidally influenced zone, there are unique biota associated with tidal creeks, which biota are often specialised to such zones. Creeks may often dry to a muddy channel with little or no flow at low tide, but often with significant depth of water at high tide.Contents1 Names 2 Examples 3 See also 4 ReferencesNames[edit] In British English
British English
and in many other countries in the Commonwealth, as well as some parts of the United States (near the Chesapeake Bay, parts of New England[1]), a creek is a tidal water channel
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Guano
Guano
Guano
(from Quechua wanu via Spanish) is the accumulated excrement of seabirds and bats. As a manure, guano is a highly effective fertilizer due to its exceptionally high content of nitrogen, phosphate and potassium: nutrients essential for plant growth. The 19th-century guano trade played a pivotal role in the development of modern input-intensive farming practices and inspired the formal human colonization of remote bird islands in many parts of the world. During the twentieth century, guano-producing birds became an important target of conservation programs and influenced the development of environmental consciousness
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Glacier
A glacier (US: /ˈɡleɪʃər/ or UK: /ˈɡlæsiə/) is a persistent body of dense ice that is constantly moving under its own weight; it forms where the accumulation of snow exceeds its ablation (melting and sublimation) over many years, often centuries. Glaciers slowly deform and flow due to stresses induced by their weight, creating crevasses, seracs, and other distinguishing features. They also abrade rock and debris from their substrate to create landforms such as cirques and moraines. Glaciers form only on land and are distinct from the much thinner sea ice and lake ice that form on the surface of bodies of water. On Earth, 99% of glacial ice is contained within vast ice sheets in the polar regions, but glaciers may be found in mountain ranges on every continent including Oceania's high-latitude oceanic islands such as New Zealand
New Zealand
and Papua New Guinea
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Puna Grassland
The Puna grassland
Puna grassland
ecoregion, of the montane grasslands and shrublands biome, is found in the central Andes Mountains
Andes Mountains
of South America. It is considered one of the eight Natural Regions in Peru,[1] but extends south, across Bolivia, as far as northern Argentina
Argentina
and Chile
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Andes
The Andes
Andes
or Andean Mountains (Spanish: Cordillera de los Andes) are the longest continental mountain range in the world. They form a continuous highland along the western edge of South America. This range is about 7,000 km (4,300 mi) long, about 200 to 700 km (120 to 430 mi) wide (widest between 18° south and 20° south latitude), and of an average height of about 4,000 m (13,000 ft). The Andes
Andes
extend from north to south through seven South American countries: Venezuela, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Argentina
Argentina
and Chile. Along their length, the Andes
Andes
are split into several ranges, which are separated by intermediate depressions. The Andes
Andes
are the location of several high plateaus – some of which host major cities such as Quito, Bogotá, Arequipa, Medellín, Sucre, Mérida and La Paz
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Alto Marañón
Alto Marañón is a region in Peru
Peru
with an area of more than 30,000 square kilometres. It is located within the northeastern region of the Marañón. The region has five significant rivers and a population in excess of 40,000 people. The population is distributed across 240 communities of mainly indigenous people. The settlers of the zone characterize themselves by a strong indigenous feeling, pride and participation at level of organization and political activity.[citation needed]This Huánuco Region
Huánuco Region
geography article is a stub
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Seabird
Seabirds (also known as marine birds) are birds that are adapted to life within the marine environment. While seabirds vary greatly in lifestyle, behaviour and physiology, they often exhibit striking convergent evolution, as the same environmental problems and feeding niches have resulted in similar adaptations. The first seabirds evolved in the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
period, and modern seabird families emerged in the Paleogene. In general, seabirds live longer, breed later and have fewer young than other birds do, but they invest a great deal of time in their young. Most species nest in colonies, which can vary in size from a few dozen birds to millions. Many species are famous for undertaking long annual migrations, crossing the equator or circumnavigating the Earth in some cases. They feed both at the ocean's surface and below it, and even feed on each other
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Fortaleza River
The Fortaleza River (Paraná) is a river of Paraná state in southern Brazil. See also[edit]List of rivers of ParanáReferences[edit]Brazilian Ministry of TransportThis article related to a river in Paraná, Brazil is a stub
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El Niño–Southern Oscillation
El Niño–Southern Oscillation
El Niño–Southern Oscillation
(ENSO) is an irregularly periodic variation in winds and sea surface temperatures over the tropical eastern Pacific Ocean, affecting climate of much of the tropics and subtropics. The warming phase of the sea temperature is known as El Niño and the cooling phase as La Niña. Southern Oscillation is the accompanying atmospheric component, coupled with the sea temperature change: El Niño
El Niño
is accompanied with high, and La Niña
La Niña
with low air surface pressure in the tropical western Pacific.[1][2] The two periods last several months each (typically occurring every few years) and their effects vary in intensity.[3] The two phases relate to the Walker circulation, discovered by Gilbert Walker during the early twentieth century
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Spanish Language
The Spanish language
Spanish language
(/ˈspænɪʃ/ ( listen);  Español (help·info)), also called the Castilian language[4] (/kæˈstɪliən/ ( listen),  castellano (help·info)), is a Western Romance language that originated in the Castile region of Spain
Spain
and today has hundreds of millions of native speakers in Latin
Latin
America and Spain. It is usually considered the world's second-most spoken native language, after Mandarin Chinese.[5][6][7][8][9] Spanish is a part of the Ibero-Romance group of languages, which evolved from several dialects of Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
in Iberia after the collapse of the Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
in the 5th century
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