HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

Anatoly Bogatyrev
Anatoly Vasilyevich Bogatyrev (Belarusian: Анатоль Васільевіч Багатыроў; August 13 [O.S. July 31] 1913 – September 19, 2003)[1][2] was a Belarusian composer and music teacher, seen as one of the leaders of the national school of Belarusian music.Contents1 Biography 2 Music 3 Selected works3.1 Stage 3.2 Vocal and choral 3.3 Orchestral 3.4 Chamber music4 Footnotes 5 ReferencesBiography[edit] Bogatyrev was born in Vitebsk, the son of a language teacher. He studied at the Vitebsk
Vitebsk
Music School, the Minsk
Minsk
School of Music, and the Conservatory of Belarus
Belarus
where he was taught composition by Vasily Zolotarev, a pupil of Rimsky-Korsakov.[3] He came to prominence while still in his twenties, being appointed chairman of the board of the Belarusian Union of Composers in 1938, and receiving the Stalin Prize in 1941
[...More...]

"Anatoly Bogatyrev" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Belarusian Language
 Belarus   Poland
Poland
(in Gmina Orla, Gmina Narewka, Gmina Czyże, Gmina Hajnówka
Hajnówka
and town of Hajnówka)Collective Security Treaty OrganizationRecognised minority language in Czech Republic[3]  Ukraine[4][5]  Lithuania[citation needed]Regulated by National Academy of Sciences of BelarusLanguage codesISO 639-1 beISO 639-2 belISO 639-3 belGlottolog bela1254[6]Linguasphere 53-AAA-eb < 53-AAA-e (varieties: 53-AAA-eba to 53-AAA-ebg)Belarusian-speaking world Legend: Dark blue - territory, where Belarusian language
Belarusian language
is used chiefly; Light blue - historical range[7]This article contains IPA phonetic symbols. Without proper rendering support, you may see question marks, boxes, or other symbols instead of Unicode
Unicode
characters
[...More...]

"Belarusian Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Tonality
Tonality
Tonality
is the arrangement of pitches and/or chords of a musical work in a hierarchy of perceived relations, stabilities, attractions and directionality. In this hierarchy, the individual pitch or triadic chord with the greatest stability is called the tonic. The root of the tonic chord forms the name given to the key; so in the key of C major, the note C is both the tonic of the scale and the root of the tonic chord (C–E–G). Simple folk music songs often start and end with the tonic note
[...More...]

"Tonality" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
[...More...]

"Special" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Eric Blom
Eric Walter Blom CBE (20 August 1888 – 11 April 1959) was a Swiss-born British-naturalised[1] music lexicographer, musicologist, music critic, music biographer and translator. He is best known as the editor of the 5th edition of Grove's Dictionary of Music and Musicians (1954).Contents1 Biography 2 Other writings 3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksBiography[edit] Blom was born in Bern, Switzerland. His father was of Danish and British descent, and his mother was Swiss. He was educated in German-speaking Switzerland,[2] and later in England. He was largely self-taught in music. He started in music journalism by assisting Rosa Newmarch in writing program notes for Sir Henry J. Wood's Prom Concerts, which were notable for their abundance of accurate information.[2] From 1923 to 1931 he was the London music correspondent for the Manchester Guardian
[...More...]

"Eric Blom" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

OCLC
OCLC, currently incorporated as OCLC
OCLC
Online Computer Library Center, Incorporated,[3] is an American nonprofit cooperative organization "dedicated to the public purposes of furthering access to the world's information and reducing information costs".[4] It was founded in 1967 as the Ohio College Library Center. OCLC
OCLC
and its member libraries cooperatively produce and maintain WorldCat, the largest online public access catalog (OPAC) in the world
[...More...]

"OCLC" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Manfred
Manfred: A dramatic poem is a closet drama written in 1816–1817 by Lord Byron. It contains supernatural elements, in keeping with the popularity of the ghost story in England at the time. It is a typical example of a Gothic fiction. Byron commenced this work in late 1816, only a few months after the famed ghost-story sessions with Percy Bysshe Shelley
Percy Bysshe Shelley
and Mary Shelley which provided the initial impetus for Frankenstein
[...More...]

"Manfred" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Nil Gilevich
Nil Hilevich
Nil Hilevich
(Belarusian: Ніл Гілевіч, Nil Hilevič Russian: Nil Gilevich) (September 30, 1931 – March 29, 2016) was a Belarusian poet, a professor in the Belarusian State University, the author of more than 80 books of poetry, publications, and translations, and one of the founders of the Frantsishak Skaryna Belarusian Language Society.[1] Biography[edit] Nil Hilevich
Nil Hilevich
was born in the village of Slabada (Słabada), in the Lahoisk (Łahojsk) District of Mensk
Mensk
Province.[2] He studied in a college in Mensk
Mensk
(from which he graduated in 1951), preparing to be a teacher. During the last year in college he worked as a teacher in one of the schools in Mensk. He continued his education at the Belarusian State University (the Faculty of Philology), and graduated in 1956. During 1960-1986 he was working at the university, and later on became a professor
[...More...]

"Nil Gilevich" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Alexander Pushkin
Alexander Sergeyevich Pushkin (/ˈpʊʃkɪn/;[1] Russian: Алекса́ндр Серге́евич Пу́шкин, tr. Aleksandr Sergeyevich Pushkin, IPA: [ɐlʲɪˈksandr sʲɪˈrɡʲejɪvʲɪtɕ ˈpuʂkʲɪn] ( listen); 6 June [O.S. 26 May] 1799 – 10 February [O.S. 29 January] 1837) was a Russian poet, playwright, and novelist of the Romantic era[2] who is considered by many to be the greatest Russian poet[3][4][5][6] and the founder of modern Russian literature.[7][8] Pushkin was born into Russian nobility
Russian nobility
in Moscow. Нis father, Sergey Lvovich Pushkin, belonged to Pushkin noble families. His matrilineal great-grandfather was Abram Petrovich Gannibal. He published his first poem at the age of fifteen and was widely recognized by the literary establishment by the time of his graduation from the Tsarskoye Selo Lyceum
[...More...]

"Alexander Pushkin" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Masquerade (play)
Masquerade (Russian: Маскарад) is a verse play written in 1835 by the Russian Romantic writer Mikhail Lermontov. The four-act play, set in 1830's St. Petersburg
St. Petersburg
aristocratic society, highlights the rebellious spirit and noble mind of the protagonist, Yevgeny Arbenin. It is often compared with Shakespeare's Othello
Othello
in its essential story line.Contents1 Plot1.1 Act I 1.2 Act II 1.3 Act III 1.4 Act IV 1.5 Conclusions2 History of the play2.1 First version 2.2 Second version 2.3 Third version3 External linksPlot[edit] The hero of the drama, Arbenin, is a wealthy middle-aged man endowed with a rebellious spirit and a strong will. Born into high society, he strives in vain to gain independence and freedom
[...More...]

"Masquerade (play)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mikhail Lermontov
Mikhail Yuryevich Lermontov (/ˈlɛərmənˌtɔːf, -ˌtɒf/;[1] Russian: Михаи́л Ю́рьевич Ле́рмонтов, IPA: [mʲɪxɐˈil ˈjurʲjɪvʲɪtɕ ˈlʲɛrməntəf]; October 15 [O.S. October 3] 1814 – July 27 [O.S. July 15] 1841) was a Russian Romantic writer, poet and painter, sometimes called "the poet of the Caucasus", the most important Russian poet after Alexander Pushkin's death in 1837 and the greatest figure in Russian Romanticism
[...More...]

"Mikhail Lermontov" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Yakub Kolas
Yakub Kolas (also Jakub Kołas, Belarusian: Яку́б Ко́лас, November 3 [O.S. October 22] 1882 – August 13, 1956), real name Kanstancin Mickievič (Міцке́віч Канстанці́н Міха́йлавіч) was a Belarusian writer, People's Poet of the Byelorussian SSR (1926), and member (1928) and vice-president (from 1929) of the Belarusian Academy of Sciences. In his works, Yakub Kolas was known for his sympathy towards the ordinary Belarusian peasantry. This was evident in his pen name 'Kolas', meaning 'ear of grain' in Belarusian. He wrote collections of poems Songs of Captivity (1908) and Songs of Grief (Belarusian: Песьні-жальбы, 1910), poems A New Land (Belarusian: Новая зямля, 1923) and Simon the Musician (Belarusian: Сымон-музыка, 1925), stories, and plays. His poem The Fisherman's Hut (Belarusian: Рыбакова хата, 1947) is about the fight after unification of Belarus with the Soviet state
[...More...]

"Yakub Kolas" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mode (music)
In the theory of Western music, a mode is a type of musical scale coupled with a set of characteristic melodic behaviors. Musical modes have been a part of western musical thought since the Middle Ages, and were inspired by the theory of ancient Greek music
[...More...]

"Mode (music)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic
Coordinates: 54°00′00″N 29°00′00″E / 54.0000°N 29.0000°E / 54.0000; 29.0000This article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed
[...More...]

"Byelorussian Soviet Socialist Republic" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Old Style And New Style Dates
Old Style (O.S.) and New Style (N.S.) are terms sometimes used with dates to indicate that the calendar convention used at the time described is different from that in use at the time the document was being written. There were two calendar changes in Great Britain and its colonies, which may sometimes complicate matters: the first change was to change the start of the year from Lady Day
Lady Day
(25 March) to 1 January; the second was to discard the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
in favour of the Gregorian calendar.[2][3][4] Closely related is the custom of dual dating, where writers gave two consecutive years to reflect differences in the starting date of the year, or to include both the Julian and Gregorian dates. Beginning in 1582, the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
replaced the Julian in Roman Catholic countries
[...More...]

"Old Style And New Style Dates" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

People's Artist
People's Artist is an honorary title in the Soviet Union, Union republics, in some other Eastern bloc
Eastern bloc
states (and communist states in general), as well as in a number of post-Soviet states, modeled after the title of the People's Artist of the USSR.Contents1 Russia 2 Vietnam 3 See also 4 ReferencesRussia[edit] The term is confusingly used to translate two different Russian language titles: "народный артист" (awarded in performing arts, see e.g., Category:People's Artists of the USSR) and "народный художник" (awarded in some visual arts: painting drawing, and photography, see e.g., Category:People's Artists of the USSR (visual arts))
[...More...]

"People's Artist" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.