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Anatole Kaletsky
Anatole Kaletsky
Anatole Kaletsky
(born 1 June 1952) is an economist and journalist based in the United Kingdom. He has written since 1976 for The Economist, The Financial Times
The Financial Times
and The Times
The Times
of London before joining Reuters
Reuters
and The International Herald Tribune
The International Herald Tribune
in 2012. He has been named Newspaper Commentator of the Year in the BBC’s What the Papers Say awards, and has twice received the British Press Award for Specialist Writer of the Year. Kaletsky has been an economic consultant since 1997, providing policy analysis and asset allocation advice to over 800 financial institutions, multinational companies and international organisations through his company, GaveKal, which is co-run with Louis and Charles Gave
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Cambridge Judge Business School
Cambridge Judge Business School
Cambridge Judge Business School
is the business school of the University of Cambridge
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George Soros
George Soros, Hon FBA (/ˈsɔːroʊs/,[4] /ˈsɔːrɒs/; Hungarian: Soros György, pronounced [ˈʃoroʃ ˈɟørɟ]; born György Schwartz; August 12, 1930)[1][2] is a Hungarian-American[a] investor,[7] business magnate, philanthropist, political activist and author.[8] Soros is one of the world's most successful investors.[9][10][11] As of February 2018, Soros had a net worth of $8 billion,[12] after donating $18 billion to his philanthropic agency, Open Society Foundations.[13] Born in Budapest, he survived Nazi Germany-occupied Hungary and emigrated to England in 1947. He attended the London School of Economics graduating with a bachelor's and eventually a master's in philosophy. He began his business career by taking various jobs at merchant banks in England and then the United States, before starting his first hedge fund, Double Eagle, in 1969. Profits from his first fund furnished the seed money to start Soros Fund Management, his second hedge fund, in 1970
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Mathematics
Mathematics
Mathematics
(from Greek μάθημα máthēma, "knowledge, study, learning") is the study of such topics as quantity,[1] structure,[2] space,[1] and change.[3][4][5] It has no generally accepted definition.[6][7] Mathematicians seek out patterns[8][9] and use them to formulate new conjectures. Mathematicians resolve the truth or falsity of conjectures by mathematical proof. When mathematical structures are good models of real phenomena, then mathematical reasoning can provide insight or predictions about nature. Through the use of abstraction and logic, mathematics developed from counting, calculation, measurement, and the systematic study of the shapes and motions of physical objects. Practical mathematics has been a human activity from as far back as written records exist
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Harvard University
Harvard University
Harvard University
is a private Ivy League
Ivy League
research university in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Established in 1636 and named for clergyman John Harvard (its first benefactor), its history, influence, and wealth have made it one of the world's most prestigious universities.[8] Harvard is the United States' oldest institution of higher learning,[9] and the Harvard Corporation
Harvard Corporation
(formally, the President and Fellows of Harvard College) is its first chartered corporation. Although never formally affiliated with any denomination, the early College primarily trained Congregational and Unitarian clergy. Its curriculum and student body were gradually secularized during the 18th century, and by the 19th century, Harvard had emerged as the central cultural establishment among Boston elites.[10][11] Following the American Civil War, President Charles W
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Business
Business
Business
is the activity of making one's living or making money by producing or buying and selling goods or services.[1][2][3][4] Simply put, it is any activity or enterprise entered into for profit. It does not mean it is a company, a corporation, partnership, or have any such formal organization, but it can range from a street peddler to General Motors.[5] The term is also often used colloquially (but not by lawyers or public officials) to refer to a company, but this article will not deal with that sense of the word.Anyone carrying on an activity that earns them a profit is doing business or running a business, and perhaps this is why there is a misconception that business and company is the same thing. A business name structure does not separate the business entity from the owner, which means that the owner of the business is responsible and liable for all debts incurred by the business
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Finance
Finance
Finance
is a field that deals with the study of investments. It includes the dynamics of assets and liabilities over time under conditions of different degrees of uncertainties and risks. Finance can also be defined as the science of money management. Market participants aim to price assets based on their risk level, fundamental value, and their expected rate of return
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Financial Times
The Financial Times
Financial Times
(FT) is a Japanese-owned, English-language international daily newspaper with a special emphasis on business and economic news. The paper was founded in 1888 by James Sheridan and Horatio Bottomley, and merged in 1945 with its closest rival, the Financial News (which had been founded in 1884). The Financial Times
Financial Times
has an average daily readership of 2.2 million people worldwide (PwC audited figures, November 2011). FT.com has 4.5 million registered users and over 285,000 digital subscribers, as well as 600,000 paying users. FT Chinese has more than 1.7 million registered users.[2] The world editions of the Financial Times
Financial Times
newspaper had a combined average daily circulation of 234,193 copies (88,000 for the UK edition) in January 2014.[3] In February 2014 the combined sale of the world editions of the Financial Times was 224,000 copies
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Prospect Magazine
Prospect is a monthly British general interest magazine, specialising in politics, economics and current affairs. Topics include British, European, and US politics, social issues, art, literature, cinema, science, the media, history, philosophy, and psychology
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Paul Volcker
Paul Adolph Volcker Jr.[3] (/ˈvoʊlkər/; born September 5, 1927) is an American economist. He was Chairman of the Federal Reserve
Chairman of the Federal Reserve
under Presidents Jimmy Carter
Jimmy Carter
and Ronald Reagan
Ronald Reagan
from August 1979 to August 1987. He is widely credited with ending the high levels of inflation seen in the United States
United States
during the 1970s and early 1980s
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Economist
An economist is a practitioner in the social science discipline of economics. The individual may also study, develop, and apply theories and concepts from economics and write about economic policy
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Jim Balsillie
James Laurence Balsillie (born February 3, 1961) is a Canadian businessman, philanthropist and former co- CEO of the Canadian company Research In Motion
Research In Motion
(RIM, 'BlackBerry'). He is also the founder of the Centre for International Governance Innovation
Centre for International Governance Innovation
(CIGI), Canadian International Council (CIC), Balsillie School of International Affairs (BSIA) and the Arctic Research Foundation (ARF). Following his retirement as co- CEO of RIM in January 2012, Balsillie assumed a director role on RIM's Board of Directors. In March 2012, he resigned from the Board due to strategic differences[3] with RIM's new leader and CEO, Thorsten Heins, who abandoned the licensing strategy[4] that Balsillie was pursuing. He served as a member of the United Nations Panel on Global Sustainability until 2012
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Quantitative Easing
Quantitative easing
Quantitative easing
(QE), also known as large-scale asset purchases,[1][2] is an expansionary monetary policy whereby a central bank buys predetermined amounts of government bonds or other financial assets in order to stimulate the economy and increase liquidity.[3][4] An unconventional form of monetary policy,[3] it is usually used when standard monetary policy has become ineffective at combating too low inflation or deflation.[5][6][7][8] A central bank implements quantitative easing by buying specified amounts of financia
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Cash Transfers
Cash transfers are direct transfer payments of money to eligible people.[1] Cash transfers are usually provided by the state and federal government.Contents1 Targeting 2 Lump sums 3 Wider economic, political and social implications3.1 Monitoring and evaluating cash transfer programmes4 Examples4.1 Humanitarian cash transfers 4.2 Case Study: Sierra Leone 4.3 GiveDirectly5 Impacts on health 6 See also 7 References 8 Further readingTargeting[edit] Cash transfer programmes in developing countries are constrained by three factors: financial resources, institutional capacity and ideolog
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Brexit
Legislation1972 EC Act 1986 EC (Amendment) Act 1993 EC (Amendment) Act 1998 EC (Amendment) Act 2002 EC (Amendment) Act 2008 EU (Amendment) Act 2011 EU ActEuropean Parliament Elections1979 1984 1989 1994 1999 2004 2009 20141973 delegation 1st 2nd 3rd 4th 5th 6th 7th 8thWithdrawal2004–05 EU Bill 2013–14 EU (Referendum) Bill 2015–16 EU membership renegotiation 2015 EU Referendum Act 2016 EU (Referendum) Act (Gibraltar)2016 EU membership referendumCauses Endorsements Issues Opinion pollingCampaignsOrganisations advocating and campaigning for a referendumPeople's Pledge Labour for a ReferendumLeave Vote Leave
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