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Anarchy
Anarchy
Anarchy
is the condition of a society, entity, group of people, or a single person that rejects hierarchy.[1][2] Colloquially, it can also refer to a society experiencing widespread turmoil and collapse. The word originally meant leaderlessness, but in 1840 Pierre-Joseph Proudhon adopted the term in his treatise What Is Property? to refer to a new political philosophy: anarchism, which advocates stateless societies based on voluntary associations. In practical terms, anarchy can refer to the curtailment or abolition of traditional forms of government and institutions
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Counter-economics
Counter-economics is a term originally used by libertarian activists and theorists Samuel Edward Konkin III
Samuel Edward Konkin III
and J. Neil Schulman. The former defined it as "the study or practice of all peaceful human action which is forbidden by the State." The term is short for "counter-establishment economics" and may also be referred to as counter-politics. Counter-economics was integrated by Schulman into Konkin's doctrine of agorism.[1]Contents1 Origin 2 Relationship with agorism 3 Strategy3.1 Vertical/Introverted 3.2 Horizontal/Extroverted4 See also 5 References 6 External linksOrigin[edit] The first presentation of the theory of counter-economics was made by Samuel Edward Konkin III
Samuel Edward Konkin III
at a conference organized by J
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Affinity Group
An affinity group is a group formed around a shared interest or common goal, to which individuals formally or informally belong. Affinity groups are generally precluded from being under the aegis of any governmental agency, and their purposes must be primarily non-commercial. Examples of affinity groups include private social clubs, fraternities, writing or reading circles, hobby clubs, and groups engaged in political activism. Some affinity groups are organized in a non-hierarchical manner, often using consensus decision making, and are frequently made up of trusted friends. They provide a method of organization that is flexible and decentralized
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Antimilitarism
Antimilitarism
Antimilitarism
(also spelt anti-militarism) is a doctrine that opposes war, relying heavily on a critical theory of imperialism and was an explicit goal of the First and Second International. Whereas pacifism is the doctrine that disputes (especially between countries) should be settled without recourse to violence, Paul B
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Dual Power
"Dual Power" (Russian: Двоевластие, tr. Dvoyevlastiye) was a term first used by Vladimir Lenin,[1][2][3] although conceptually first outlined by Pierre-Joseph Proudhon,[4] which described a situation in the wake of the February Revolution
February Revolution
in which two powers, the workers councils (or Soviets, particularly the Petrograd Soviet) and the official state apparatus of the Provisional Government coexisted with each other and competed for legitimacy. Lenin argued that this essentially unstable situation constituted a unique opportunity for the Soviets to seize power by smashing the Provisional Government and establishing themselves as the basis of a new form of state power
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Conscientious Objector
Military service National service Conscription
Conscription
crisis Conscientious objector Alternative civilian service Conscription
Conscription
by countryv t eA conscientious objector is an "individual who has claimed the right to refuse to perform military service"[1] on the grounds of freedom of thought, conscience, or religion.[2] In some countries, conscientious objectors are assigned to an alternative civilian service as a substitute for conscription or military service
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Class Conflict
Class conflict, frequently referred to as class warfare or class struggle, is the tension or antagonism which exists in society due to competing socioeconomic interests and desires between people of different classes. The view that the class struggle provides the lever for radical social change for the majority is central to the work of communist Karl Marx
Karl Marx
and the anarchist Mikhail Bakunin. Class conflict
Class conflict
can take many different forms: direct violence, such as wars fought for resources and cheap labor; indirect violence, such as deaths from poverty, starvation, illness or unsafe working conditions; coercion, such as the threat of losing a job or the pulling of an important investment; or ideologically, such as with books and articles
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Deep Ecology
Deep ecology
Deep ecology
is an ecological and environmental philosophy promoting the inherent worth of living beings regardless of their instrumental utility to human needs, plus a radical restructuring of modern human societies in accordance with such ideas. Deep ecology
Deep ecology
argues that the natural world is a subtle balance of complex inter-relationships in which the existence of organisms is dependent on the existence of others within ecosystems.[1] Human interference with or destruction of the natural world poses a threat therefore not only to humans but to all organisms constituting the natural order. Deep ecology's core principle is the belief that the living environment as a whole should be respected and regarded as having certain inalienable legal rights to live and flourish, independent of its utilitarian instrumental benefits for human use
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Direct Democracy
Direct democracy
Direct democracy
or pure democracy is a form of democracy in which people decide on policy initiatives directly. This differs from the majority of most currently established democracies, which are representative democracies.Contents1 Overview 2 History 3 Examples3.1 Ancient Athens 3.2 Switzerland 3.3 Paris Commune 3.4 United States 3.5 Rojava 3.6 Occupy Wall Street4 Democratic reform trilemma 5 Electronic direct democracy 6 Relation to other movements 7 In schools 8 Contemporary movements 9 See also 10 Notes and references 11 Bibliography 12 Further reading 13 External links13.1 MultimediaOverview[edit] In a representative democracy, people vote for representatives who then enact policy initiatives.[1] In direct democracy, people decide on policies without any intermediary
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Consensus Democracy
Consensus democracy is the application of consensus decision-making to the process of legislation in a democracy. It is characterized by a decision-making structure which involves and takes into account as broad a range of opinions as possible, as opposed to systems where minority opinions can potentially be ignored by vote-winning majorities.[1] The latter systems are classified as Majoritarian Democracy. Consensus democracy also features increased citizen participation both in determining the political agenda and in the decision-making process itself
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Anationalism
Anationalism
Anationalism
(Esperanto: sennaciismo) is a term originating from the community of Esperanto
Esperanto
speakers
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Postcolonial Anarchism
Post-colonial anarchism is a term coined by Roger White in response to his experience as an Anarchist
Anarchist
Person of Color in the anarchist movement in North America. Between 1994 and 2004 White wrote a series of essays reflecting on experiences in the anarchist movement. He identifies racial isolation and tokenism as important features of the experience of people of color in the anarchist movement and attributes this to the prevalence European universalism and an approach to class struggle as a binary relationship between workers and capitalists which does not take account of the cultural aspects of imperialism.[1] Post-colonial anarchism is an attempt to bring together disparate aspects and tendencies within the existing anarchist movement and re-envision them in an explicitly anti-imperialist framework
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Left Anarchism
The terms left anarchism and left-wing anarchism distinguish collectivist anarchism from laissez-faire anarchism and right-libertarian philosophies.[1][2] Left anarchists refer to philosophies which posit a future society in which private property is replaced by reciprocity and non-hierarchical society.[3][4] The term "left anarchism" is sometimes used synonymously with libertarian socialism,[5] left-libertarianism or social anarchism.[6] More traditional anarchists typically discourage the concept of "left-wing" theories of anarchism on grounds of redundancy, that it lends legitimacy to the notion that anarchism is compatible with capitalism[7][8] or nationalism.[9][10] Ulrike Heider, a syndicalist, categorized anarchism into left anarchism, right anarchism (anarcho-capitalism) and green anarchism.[11][page needed] See also[edit]Anarcho-capitalism Collectivist anarchism National-Anarchism Post-left anarchy Right-libertarianism Social anarchismReferences[edit]
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Commune (socialism)
The commune is a model of government that is generally advocated by communists, revolutionary socialists, and anarchists. The model is often characterized as being a local and transparent organization composed of delegates bound by mandates. These delegates would be recallable at any time from their positions
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Anarchist Black Cross
The Anarchist Black Cross
Anarchist Black Cross
(ABC, formerly the Anarchist Red Cross) is an anarchist support organization. The group is notable for its efforts at providing prisoners with political literature, but it also organizes material and legal support for class struggle prisoners worldwide
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Philosophical Anarchism
Philosophical anarchism
Philosophical anarchism
is an anarchist school of thought[1] which holds that the state lacks moral legitimacy while not supporting violence to eliminate it.[2] Though philosophical anarchism does not necessarily imply any action or desire for the elimination of the State, philosophical anarchists do not believe that they have an obligation or duty to obey the State, or conversely, that the State has a right to command. Philosophical anarchism
Philosophical anarchism
is a component especially of individualist anarchism.[3] Scholar Michael Freeden
Michael Freeden
identifies four broad types of individualist anarchism. He says the first is the type associated with William Godwin that advocates self-government with a "progressive rationalism that included benevolence to others." The second type is egoism, most associated with Max Stirner
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