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Anamorphic Art
Anamorphosis
Anamorphosis
is a distorted projection or perspective requiring the viewer to use special devices or occupy a specific vantage point (or both) to reconstitute the image. The word "anamorphosis" is derived from the Greek prefix ana‑, meaning "back" or "again", and the word morphe, meaning "shape" or "form"
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Anamorphosis (other)
The word anamorph and its derivates may mean:Contents1 Biology 2 Art and film 3 Computer science 4 See alsoBiology[edit]Anamorph, an asexual part of the life cycle of fungi in the phyla Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, often mold-like.Anamorphic, characterized by an anamorph or to an abnormal change giving the appearance of a different species as in the case of fungi or lichens Anamorphosis
Anamorphosis
(biology), a limited type of metamorphosis in which an arthropod adds extra body segments during ecdysis, while retaining the same general form and habitsArt and film[edit] Anamorph (film), a 2007 film by Henry S
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Viewing Frustum
In 3D computer graphics, the view frustum[1] (also called viewing frustum[2]) is the region of space in the modeled world that may appear on the screen; it is the field of view of the notional camera.[1] The view frustum is typically obtained by taking a frustum—that is a truncation with parallel planes—of the pyramid of vision, which is the adaptation of (idealized) cone of vision that a camera or eye would have to the rectangular viewports typically used in computer graphics.[3][4] Some authors use pyramid of vision as a synonym for view frustum itself, i.e. consider it truncated.[5] The exact shape of this region varies depending on what kind of camera lens is being simulated, but typically it is a frustum of a rectangular pyramid (hence the name). The planes that cut the frustum perpendicular to the viewing direction are called the near plane and the far plane. Objects closer to the camera than the near plane or beyond the far plane are not drawn
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Map Projection
A map projection is a systematic transformation of the latitudes and longitudes of locations from the surface of a sphere or an ellipsoid into locations on a plane.[1] Maps cannot be created without map projections. All map projections necessarily distort the surface in some fashion. Depending on the purpose of the map, some distortions are acceptable and others are not; therefore, different map projections exist in order to preserve some properties of the sphere-like body at the expense of other properties. There is no limit to the number of possible map projections.[2]:1 More generally, the surfaces of planetary bodies can be mapped even if they are too irregular to be modeled well with a sphere or ellipsoid; see below. Even more generally, projections are a subject of several pure mathematical fields, including differential geometry, projective geometry, and manifolds
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Picture Plane
In painting, photography, graphical perspective and descriptive geometry, a picture plane is an image plane located between the "eye point" (or oculus) and the object being viewed and is usually coextensive to the material surface of the work. It is ordinarily a vertical plane perpendicular to the sightline to the object of interest.Contents1 Features 2 Position 3 Integrity of the picture plane 4 See also 5 ReferencesFeatures[edit] In the technique of graphical perspective the picture plane has several features:Given are an eye point O (from oculus), a horizontal plane of reference called the ground plane γ and a picture plane π... The line of intersection of π and γ is called the ground line and denoted GR. ..
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Plans (drawings)
Plans are a set of drawings or two-dimensional diagrams used to describe a place or object, or to communicate building or fabrication instructions. Usually plans are drawn or printed on paper, but they can take the form of a digital file. These plans are used in a range of fields from architecture, urban planning, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, industrial engineering to systems engineering.Contents1 Overview 2 Plan features2.1 Format 2.2 Scale 2.3 Views and projections 2.4 Planning approach3 See alsoOverview[edit] Plans are often for technical purposes such as architecture, engineering, or planning. Their purpose in these disciplines is to accurately and unambiguously capture all the geometric features of a site, building, product or component. Plans can also be for presentation or orientation purposes, and as such are often less detailed versions of the former
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Projection (linear Algebra)
In linear algebra and functional analysis, a projection is a linear transformation P from a vector space to itself such that P 2 = P. That is, whenever P is applied twice to any value, it gives the same result as if it were applied once (idempotent). It leaves its image unchanged.[1] Though abstract, this definition of "projection" formalizes and generalizes the idea of graphical projection
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Projection Plane
A projection plane, or plane of projection, is a type of view in which graphical projections from an object intersect.[1] Projection planes are used often in descriptive geometry and graphical representation. A picture plane in perspective drawing is a type of projection plane. With perspective drawing, the lines of sight, or projection lines, between an object and a picture plane return to a vanishing point and are not parallel. With parallel projection the lines of sight from the object to the projection plane are parallel.Perspective projection of triangle ABC on plane Π from point S. Axonometric projection
Axonometric projection
on projection plane ΠA cube in two-point perspectiveSimulated rays of light travel from the object, through the projection plane, and to the viewer's eye or camera
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Stereoscopy
Stereoscopy
Stereoscopy
(also called stereoscopics, or stereo imaging) is a technique for creating or enhancing the illusion of depth in an image by means of stereopsis for binocular vision[2]. The word stereoscopy derives from Greek στερεός (stereos), meaning 'firm, solid', and σκοπέω (skopeō), meaning 'to look, to see'.[3][4] Any stereoscopic image is called a stereogram. Originally, stereogram referred to a pair of stereo images which could be viewed using a stereoscope. Most stereoscopic methods present two offset images separately to the left and right eye of the viewer. These two-dimensional images are then combined in the brain to give the perception of 3D depth
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Technical Drawing
Technical drawing, drafting or drawing, is the act and discipline of composing drawings that visually communicate how something functions or is constructed. Technical drawing
Technical drawing
is essential for communicating ideas in industry and engineering. To make the drawings easier to understand, people use familiar symbols, perspectives, units of measurement, notation systems, visual styles, and page layout. Together, such conventions constitute a visual language and help to ensure that the drawing is unambiguous and relatively easy to understand. Many of the symbols and principles of technical drawing are codified in an international standard called ISO 128. The need for precise communication in the preparation of a functional document distinguishes technical drawing from the expressive drawing of the visual arts. Artistic drawings are subjectively interpreted; their meanings are multiply determined
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Vanishing Point
A vanishing point is a point on the image plane of a perspective drawing where the two-dimensional perspective projections (or drawings) of mutually parallel lines in three-dimensional space appear to converge
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Video Game Graphics
A variety of computer graphic techniques have been used to display video game content throughout the history of video games
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Affine Transformation
In geometry, an affine transformation, affine map[1] or an affinity (from the Latin, affinis, "connected with") is a function between affine spaces which preserves points, straight lines and planes
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Graphical Projection
Graphical projection
Graphical projection
is a protocol, used in technical drawing, by which an image of a three-dimensional object is projected onto a planar surface without the aid of numerical calculation.Contents1 Overview 2 Parallel projection2.1 Orthographic projection2.1.1 Multiview projection 2.1.2 Axonometric projection2.1.2.1 Isometric projection 2.1.2.2 Dimetric projection 2.1.2.3 Trimetric projection2.2 Oblique projection2.2.1 Cavalier projection 2.2.2 Cabinet projection 2.2.3 Military projection2.3 Limitations of parallel projection3 Perspective projection 4 See also 5 ReferencesOverview[edit]Several types of graphical projection comparedVarious projections and how they are producedThe projection is achieved by the use of imaginary "projectors". The projected, mental image becomes the technician’s vision of the desired, finished picture
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Caricature
A caricature is a rendered image showing the features of its subject in a simplified or exaggerated way through sketching, pencil strokes, or through other artistic drawings. In literature, a caricature is a description of a person using exaggeration of some characteristics and oversimplification of others.[1] Caricatures can be insulting or complimentary and can serve a political purpose or be drawn solely for entertainment. Caricatures of politicians are commonly used in editorial cartoons, while caricatures of movie stars are often found in entertainment magazines.Contents1 Etymology 2 History 3 Notable caricaturists 4 Computerization 5 The caricature advantage 6 Modern use6.1 Museums7 See also 8 References 9 External linksEtymology[edit] The term is derived from the Italian caricare—to charge or load
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Erotic
Eroticism
Eroticism
(from the Greek ἔρως, eros—"desire") is a quality that causes sexual feelings,[1] as well as a philosophical contemplation concerning the aesthetics of sexual desire, sensuality and romantic love. That quality may be found in any form of artwork, including painting, sculpture, photography, drama, film, music or literature. It may also be found in advertising
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