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Amy Winehouse
Amy Jade Winehouse (14 September 1983 – 23 July 2011) was an English singer and songwriter. She was known for her deep, expressive contralto vocals and her eclectic mix of musical genres, including soul[1][2][3] (sometimes labelled as blue-eyed soul and neo soul),[4][5] rhythm and blues,[6][7][8] and jazz.[9][10] Winehouse's debut album, Frank (2003), was a critical success in the UK and was nominated for the Mercury Prize
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Jamaica Wine House
Jamaica Wine House, known locally as "the Jampot", is located in St Michael's Alley, Cornhill, in the heart of London's financial district. It was the first coffee house in London and was visited by the English diarist Samuel Pepys
Samuel Pepys
in 1660.[1] It is now a Grade II listed public house[2] and is set within a labyrinth of medieval courts and alleys in the City of London. Jamaica Wine House
Jamaica Wine House
has historic links with the sugar trade and slave plantations of the West Indies
West Indies
and Turkey. There is a plaque on the wall which reads 'Here stood the first London Coffee house
Coffee house
at the sign of the Pasqual Rosee's Head 1652.' Pasqua Rosée, the proprietor was the servant of a Levant Company
Levant Company
merchant named Daniel Edwards, a trader in Turkish goods, who imported the coffee and assisted Rosée in setting up the establishment
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Jazz
Jazz
Jazz
is a music genre that originated in the African-American communities of New Orleans, United States,[1] in the late 19th and early 20th centuries, and developed from roots in blues and ragtime.[2] Jazz
Jazz
is seen by many as 'America's classical music'.[3] Since the 1920s Jazz
Jazz
Age, jazz has become recognized as a major form of musical expression. It then emerged in the form of independent traditional and popular musical styles, all linked by the common bonds of African-American
African-American
and European-American
European-American
musical parentage with a performance orientation.[4] Jazz
Jazz
is characterized by swing and blue notes, call and response vocals, polyrhythms and improvisation
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Jews
Enlarged population (includes full or partial Jewish ancestry): 20.7 million[1] (2018, est.)Regions with significant populations Israel6,558,100–6,958,300[1] United States5,700,000–10,000,000[1] France453,000–600,000[1] Canada390,500–550,000[1] United Kingdom290,000–370,000[1] Argentina180,300–330,000[1] Russia172,000–440,000[1] Germany116,000–225,000[1] Australia113,400–140,000[1] Brazil93,200–150,000[1] South Africa69,000–80,000[1] Ukraine50,000–140,000[1] Hungary47,400–100,000[1] Mexico40,000–50,000[1] Netherlands29,800–52,000[1] Belgium29,200–40,000[1] Italy27,500–41,000[1]  Switzerland18,600–25,000[1] Chile18,300–26,000[1] Uruguay16,700–25,000[1] Turkey15,000–
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Contralto
A contralto (Italian pronunciation: [konˈtralto]) is a type of classical female singing voice whose vocal range is the lowest female voice type.[1] The contralto's vocal range is fairly rare; similar to, but different from the alto, and almost identical to that of a countertenor, typically between the F below middle C (F3 in scientific pitch notation) to the second F above middle C (F5), although, at the extremes, some voices can reach the E below middle C (E3) or the second B♭ above middle C (B♭5).[1] The contralto voice type is generally divided into the coloratura, lyric, and dramatic contralto.Contents1 History 2 Voice type 3 Subtypes and roles in opera3.1 Coloratura 3.2 Lyric 3.3 Dramatic4 See also 5 References 6 Further reading 7 External linksHistory[edit] "Contralto" is primarily meaningful only in reference to classical and operatic singing, as other traditions lack a comparable system of vocal categorization
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Russian Jewish
Jews
Jews
in the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
have historically constituted a large religious diaspora; the vast territories of the Russian Empire
Russian Empire
at one time hosted the largest population of Jews
Jews
in the world.[9] Within these territories the primarily Ashkenazi Jewish communities of many different areas flourished and developed many of modern Judaism's most distinctive theological and cultural traditions, while also facing periods of anti-Semitic discriminatory policies and persecutions
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Polish Jewish
The history of the Jews
Jews
in Poland
Poland
dates back over 1,000 years. For centuries, Poland
Poland
was home to the largest and most significant Jewish community in the world. Poland
Poland
was the centre of Jewish
Jewish
culture, thanks to a long period of statutory religious tolerance and social autonomy. This ended with the Partitions of Poland
Poland
which began in 1772, in particular, with the discrimination and persecution of Jews in the Russian Empire. During World War II
World War II
there was a nearly complete genocidal destruction of the Polish Jewish
Jewish
community by Nazi Germany and its collaborators, during the 1939–1945 German occupation of Poland
Poland
and the ensuing Holocaust
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Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur (/jɔːm, joʊm, jɒm ˈkɪpər, kɪˈpʊər/;[1] Hebrew: יוֹם כִּיפּוּר‬, IPA: [ˈjom kiˈpuʁ], or יום הכיפורים‬), also known as the Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the year in Judaism.[2] Its central themes are atonement and repentance
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Ronnie Scott
Ronnie Scott
Ronnie Scott
OBE
OBE
(born Ronald Schatt, 28 January 1927 – 23 December 1996) was an English jazz tenor saxophonist and jazz club owner.Contents1 Life and career 2 Ronnie Scott's Jazz
Jazz
Club 3 Selected band line-ups 4 Selected discography 5 See also 6 References 7 External linksLife and career[edit] Ronnie Scott
Ronnie Scott
was born in Aldgate, East London, into a Jewish family.[1][2] His father Joseph Schatt was of Russian extraction and his mother Sylvia's family attended the Portuguese synagogue in Alie Street.[3][4][5] Ronnie Scott
Ronnie Scott
attended the Central Foundation Boys' School.[6] Scott began playing in small jazz clubs at the age of 16, his claim to fame then being that he was taught to play by "Vera Lynn's father-in-law!"
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Fly Me To The Moon
"Fly Me to the Moon", originally titled "In Other Words", is a song written in 1954 by Bart Howard. Kaye Ballard
Kaye Ballard
made the first recording of the song the year it was written
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Hatfield Heath
Hatfield Heath
Hatfield Heath
is a village, civil parish, and an electoral ward in the Uttlesford
Uttlesford
district of Essex, England, and at its west is close to the border with Hertfordshire. In close proximity are the towns of Bishop's Stortford
Bishop's Stortford
and Sawbridgeworth. Stansted Airport
Stansted Airport
is approximately 5 miles (8 km) to the north.Contents1 History 2 Culture and community 3 Transport 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit] The neighbouring Hatfield Broad Oak
Hatfield Broad Oak
was a market town which shrank to a large village. As it declined Hatfield Heath, then in the parish of Hatfield Broad Oak, grew because of its proximity to main roads through the parish. In 1660 the fair at Hatfield Broad Oak
Hatfield Broad Oak
was moved to Hatfield Heath
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General Field "Big Four" Grammy Award
The Grammy Awards are awarded in a series of categories, each of which isolate a specific contribution to the recording industry. The standard awards list nominees in each category from which a winner is selected
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Sylvia Young Theatre School
Theatre
Theatre
or theater[1] is a collaborative form of fine art that uses live performers, typically actors or actresses, to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific place, often a stage. The performers may communicate this experience to the audience through combinations of gesture, speech, song, music, and dance
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Rhythm And Blues
Rhythm and blues, often abbreviated as R&B, is a genre of popular music that originated in the 1940s.[1] The term was originally used by record companies to describe recordings marketed predominantly to urban African Americans, at a time when "urbane, rocking, jazz based music with a heavy, insistent beat" was becoming more popular.[2] In the commercial rhythm and blues music typical of the 1950s through the 1970s, the bands usually consisted of piano, one or two guitars, bass, drums, one or more saxophones, and sometimes background vocalists. R&B lyrical themes often encapsulate the African-American experience of pain and the quest for freedom and joy,[3] as well as triumphs and failures in terms of relationships, economics, aspirations, and sex. The term "rhythm and blues" has undergone a number of shifts in meaning
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Blue-eyed Soul
Blue-eyed soul
Blue-eyed soul
(also known as white soul)[1] is rhythm and blues and soul music.[2] The term was coined in the mid-1960s, to describe white artists who performed soul and R&B that was similar to the music of the Motown
Motown
and Stax record labels
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The Fast Show
The Fast Show, known as Brilliant in the US, is a BBC
BBC
comedy sketch show programme that ran from 1994 to 1997, with specials in 2000 and 2014. It was one of the most popular sketch shows of the 1990s in the UK. The show's central performers were Paul Whitehouse, Charlie Higson, Simon Day, Mark Williams, John Thomson, Arabella Weir and Caroline Aherne. Other significant cast members included Paul Shearer, Rhys Thomas, Jeff Harding, Maria McErlane, Eryl Maynard, Colin McFarlane and Donna Ewin. It was loosely structured and relied on character sketches, recurring running gags, and many catchphrases
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