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Amphibalus
Saint Amphibalus
Amphibalus
is a venerated early Christian priest said to have converted Saint Alban
Saint Alban
to Christianity. He occupied a place in British hagiography almost as revered as Saint Alban
Saint Alban
himself.[1] According to many hagiographical accounts, including those of Gildas, Bede, Geoffrey of Monmouth, and Matthew of Paris, Amphibalus
Amphibalus
was a Roman Christian fleeing religious persecution under Emperor Diocletian. Saint Amphibalus
Amphibalus
was offered shelter by Saint Alban
Saint Alban
in the Roman city of Verulamium, in modern-day England. Saint Alban
Saint Alban
was so impressed with the priest's faith and teaching that he began to emulate him in worship, and eventually became a Christian himself. When Roman soldiers came to seize St
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Caerleon
Caerleon
Caerleon
(/kərˈliːən/; Welsh: Caerllion) is a suburban town and community, situated on the River Usk[1][2] in the northern outskirts of the city of Newport, Wales. Caerleon
Caerleon
is a site of archaeological importance, being the location of a notable Roman legionary fortress, Isca Augusta, and an Iron Age
Iron Age
hillfort. The Wales
Wales
National Roman Legion Museum and Roman Baths Museum
Roman Baths Museum
are in Caerleon
Caerleon
close to the remains of Isca Augusta
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Elfin Of Warrington
Warrington
Warrington
is a large town and unitary authority area in Cheshire, England, on the banks of the River Mersey, 20 miles (32 km) east of Liverpool, and 20 miles (32 km) west of Manchester. The population in 2016 was estimated at 208,800,[2] more than double that of 1968 when it became a New Town. Warrington
Warrington
is the largest town in the county of Cheshire. Warrington
Warrington
was founded by the Romans at an important crossing place on the River Mersey. A new settlement was established by the Saxons. By the Middle Ages, Warrington
Warrington
had emerged as a market town at the lowest bridging point of the river
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List Of Anglo-Saxon Saints
The Anglo- Saxons
Saxons
were a people who inhabited Great Britain
Great Britain
from the 5th century. They comprise people from Germanic tribes
Germanic tribes
who migrated to the island from continental Europe, their descendants, and indigenous British groups who adopted some aspects of Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
culture and language. Historically, the Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period denotes the period in Britain between about 450 and 1066, after their initial settlement and up until the Norman conquest.[1] The early Anglo-Saxon
Anglo-Saxon
period includes the creation of an English nation, with many of the aspects that survive today, including regional government of shires and hundreds. During this period, Christianity was established and there was a flowering of literature and language
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Winchester Cathedral
Winchester
Winchester
Cathedral
Cathedral
is a Church of England
Church of England
cathedral in Winchester, Hampshire, England. It is one of the largest cathedrals in Europe, with the longest nave and greatest overall length of any Gothic cathedral in Europe.[2] Dedicated to the Holy Trinity,[1] Saint
Saint
Peter, Saint
Saint
Paul, and before the Reformation, Saint
Saint
Swithun,[3] it is the seat of the Bishop
Bishop
of Winchester
Winchester
and centre of the Diocese
Diocese
of Winchester
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George Gilbert Scott
Sir George Gilbert Scott RA (13 July 1811 – 27 March 1878), styled Sir Gilbert Scott, was a prolific English Gothic revival
Gothic revival
architect, chiefly associated with the design, building and renovation of churches and cathedrals, although he started his career as a leading designer of workhouses
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Chancel
In church architecture, the chancel is the space around the altar, including the choir and the sanctuary (sometimes called the presbytery), at the liturgical east end of a traditional Christian church building.[1] It may terminate in an apse. It is generally the area used by the clergy and choir during worship, while the congregation is in the nave. Direct access may be provided by a priest's door, usually on the south side of the church.[2] This is one definition, sometimes called the "strict" one; in practice in churches where the eastern end contains other elements such as an ambulatory and side chapels, these are also often counted as part of the chancel, especially when discussing architecture.[3] In smaller churches, where the altar is backed by the outside east wall and there is no distinct choir, the chancel and sanctuary may be the same area
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Hagiographic
A hagiography (/ˌhæɡiˈɒɡrəfi/; from Greek ἅγιος, hagios, meaning 'holy', and -γραφία, -graphia, meaning 'writing')[1] is a biography of a saint or an ecclesiastical leader. The term hagiography may be used to refer to the biography of a saint or highly developed spiritual being in any of the world's spiritual traditions. Christian hagiographies focus on the lives, and notably the miracles, ascribed to men and women canonized by the Roman Catholic church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox churches, and the Church of the East
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Thomas à Becket
Thomas Becket (/ˈbɛkɪt/; also known as Saint Thomas of Canterbury, Thomas of London,[1] and later Thomas à Becket;[note 1] (21 December c. 1119 (or 1120) – 29 December 1170) was Archbishop of Canterbury from 1162 until his murder in 1170. He is venerated as a saint and martyr by both the Catholic Church and the Anglican Communion. He engaged in conflict with Henry II, King of England, over the rights and privileges of the Church and was murdered by followers of the king in Canterbury Cathedral. Soon after his death, he was canonised by Pope Alexander III.Contents1 Sources 2 Early life 3 Primacy 4 Constitutions of Clarendon 5 Assassination 6 After Becket's death 7 Cult in the Middle Ages 8 Legacy 9 Notes 10 Citations 11 References 12 Further reading 13 External linksSources[edit] The main sources for the life of Becket are a number of biographies that were written by contemporaries
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Glastonbury Abbey
Glastonbury
Glastonbury
Abbey
Abbey
was a monastery in Glastonbury, Somerset, England. Its ruins, a grade I listed building and scheduled ancient monument, are open as a visitor attraction. The abbey was founded in the 7th century and enlarged in the 10th. It was destroyed by a major fire in 1184, but subsequently rebuilt and by the 14th century was one of the richest and most powerful monasteries in England. The abbey controlled large tracts of the surrounding land and was instrumental in major drainage projects on the Somerset Levels. The abbey was suppressed during the Dissolution of the Monasteries under King Henry VIII of England
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Martyrologium Hieronymianum
The Martyrologium Hieronymianum or Martyrologium sancti Hieronymi (both meaning "martyrology of Jerome") is an ancient martyrology or list of Christian martyrs in calendar order, one of the most used and influential of the Middle Ages
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Julius And Aaron
Saint Aaron and Saint Julius (or Julian) were two Romano-British Christian saints who were martyred around the third century. Along with Saint Alban, they are the only named martyrs from Roman Britain. Most historians place the martyrdom in Caerleon, although other suggestions have placed it in Chester or Leicester. Their feast day was traditionally celebrated on 1 July,[1] but it is now observed together with Alban on 20 June by the Eastern Orthodox, Roman Catholic and Anglican Churches.[3][4] The earliest surviving account of Aaron and Julius comes from Gildas, a monk writing in Western Britain during the sixth century. How accurate his account of events that occurred three centuries before is remains unknown. Gildas' account was later repeated by the eighth-century Anglo-Saxon monk Bede
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Passio Albani
Albani, an Italian surname from the Latin name Albanus or from Alba, may refer to:Contents1 Individuals 2 Groups 3 Other uses 4 See alsoIndividuals[edit]Alessandro Albani (1692–1779), Italian Cardinal and antiquities collector Annibale Albani (1682–1751), Italian Cardinal Dame Emma Albani (1847–1930), Canadian soprano singer Francesco Albani (1578–1660), Italian painter Gian Francesco Albani (1720–1803), Italian Cardinal Gian Girolamo Albani (1509–1591), Italian Cardinal Giuseppe Albani (1750–1834), Italian Cardinal Giuseppe Albani (footballer) (born 1921), Italian footballer Luigi Albani (born 1928), Italian footballer Marcella Albani (1899–1959), Italian actress Marcello Albani (1905–1980), American-born Italian filmmaker Muhammad Nasiruddin al-Albani (1914–1999), Albanian Islamic scholar Nicola Albani (born 1981), San Marinese footballer Pope Clement XI (1649–1721), born Giovanni Francesco Albani Romano Albani (1945–2014), Italian
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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Martyr
A martyr (Greek: μάρτυς, mártys, "witness"; stem μάρτυρ-, mártyr-) is someone who suffers persecution and death for advocating, renouncing, refusing to renounce, or refusing to advocate a belief or cause as demanded by an external party. This refusal to comply with the presented demands results in the punishment or execution of the martyr by the oppressor. Originally applied only to those who suffered for their religious beliefs, the term has come to be used in connection with people imprisoned[citation needed] or killed for espousing a political cause. Most martyrs are considered holy or are respected by their followers, becoming symbols of exceptional leadership and heroism in the face of difficult circumstances
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Barloc
Chester
Chester
Cathedral
Cathedral
is a Church of England
Church of England
cathedral and the mother church of the Diocese
Diocese
of Chester. It is located in the city of Chester, Cheshire, England. The cathedral (formerly the abbey church of a Benedictine
Benedictine
monastery, dedicated to Saint Werburgh) is dedicated to Christ and the Blessed Virgin Mary. Since 1541 it has been the seat of the Bishop
Bishop
of Chester. The cathedral is a Grade I listed building, and part of a heritage site that also includes the former monastic buildings to the north, which are also listed Grade I. The cathedral, typical of English cathedrals in having been modified many times, dates from between 1093 and the early 16th century, although the site itself may have been used for Christian worship since Roman times
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