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Amiga 4000
The Commodore Amiga
Amiga
4000, or A4000, is the successor of the A2000 and A3000 computers. There are two models, the A4000/040 released in October 1992 with a Motorola 68040
Motorola 68040
CPU, and the A4000/030 released in April 1993 with a Motorola 68EC030. The Amiga
Amiga
4000 system design was generally similar to the A3000's, but introduced the Advanced Graphics Architecture (AGA) chipset with enhanced graphics. The SCSI
SCSI
system from previous Amigas was replaced by the lower-cost Parallel ATA. The original A4000 is housed in a beige horizontal desktop box with a separate keyboard
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Intel 80286
The Intel
Intel
80286[1] (also marketed as the iAPX 286[2] and often called Intel
Intel
286) is a 16-bit microprocessor that was introduced on 1 February 1982. It was the first 8086
8086
based CPU with separate, non-multiplexed address and data buses and also the first with memory management and wide protection abilities
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NewTek
NewTek, Inc. is a San Antonio, Texas–based hardware and software company that produces live and post-production video tools and visual imaging software for personal computers. The company was founded in 1985 in Topeka, Kansas, United States, by Tim Jenison and Paul Montgomery.[citation needed]Contents1 Products1.1 Current product line1.1.1 LightWave 3D 1.1.2 TriCaster 1.1.3 3Play 1.1.4 TalkShow 1.1.5 Accessory products 1.1.6 NDI Applications2 Company history 3 Notable personalities3.1 Tim Jenison 3.2 Kiki Stockhammer4 References 5 External linksProducts[edit] In 2005, NewTek
NewTek
introduced TriCaster, a product that merges live video switching, broadcast graphics, virtual sets, special effects, audio mixing, recording, social media publishing and web streaming into an integrated, portable and compact appliance. TriCaster was announced at DEMO@15 and then launched at NAB 2005
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Light Pen
A light pen is a computer input device in the form of a light-sensitive wand used in conjunction with a computer's CRT display. It allows the user to point to displayed objects or draw on the screen in a similar way to a touchscreen but with greater positional accuracy. A light pen can work with any CRT-based display, but its ability to be used with LCDs was unclear (though Toshiba and Hitachi displayed a similar idea at the "Display 2006" show in Japan[1]). A light pen detects a change of brightness of nearby screen pixels when scanned by cathode ray tube electron beam and communicates the timing of this event to the computer
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RS-232
In telecommunications, RS-232, Recommended Standard 232[1] is a standard introduced in 1960[2] for serial communication transmission of data. It formally defines the signals connecting between a DTE (data terminal equipment) such as a computer terminal, and a DCE (data circuit-terminating equipment or data communication equipment), such as a modem. The RS-232
RS-232
standard had been commonly used in computer serial ports. The standard defines the electrical characteristics and timing of signals, the meaning of signals, and the physical size and pinout of connectors
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Serial Port
In computing, a serial port is a serial communication interface through which information transfers in or out one bit at a time (in contrast to a parallel port).[1] Throughout most of the history of personal computers, data was transferred through serial ports to devices such as modems, terminals, and various peripherals. While such interfaces as Ethernet, FireWire, and USB
USB
all send data as a serial stream, the term "serial port" usually identifies hardware more or less compliant to the RS-232
RS-232
standard, intended to interface with a modem or with a similar communication device. Modern computers without serial ports may require serial-to-USB converters to allow compatibility with RS-232
RS-232
serial devices. Serial ports are still used in applications such as industrial automation systems, scientific instruments, point of sale systems and some industrial and consumer products
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Centronics
Centronics
Centronics
Data Computer Corporation was an American manufacturer of computer printers, now remembered primarily for the parallel interface that bears its name, the Centronics
Centronics
connector.Contents1 History1.1 Foundations 1.2 Change of ownership 1.3 Printer division sale2 Centronics
Centronics
101 3 Legacy 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksHistory[edit] Foundations[edit]1971 corporate logo, used until 1986 and after the 1987 sale to GENICOM Centronics
Centronics
began as a division of Wang Laboratories. Founded and initially operated by Robert Howard (president) and Samuel Lang (vice president and owner of the well known K & L Color Photo Service Lab in New York City), the group produced remote terminals and systems for the casino industry. Printers were developed to print receipts and transaction reports
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Parallel Port
A parallel port is a type of interface found on computers (personal and otherwise) for connecting peripherals. The name refers to the way the data is sent; parallel ports send multiple bits of data at once, in parallel communication, as opposed to serial interfaces that send bits one at a time. To do this, parallel ports require multiple data lines in their cables and port connectors, and tend to be larger than contemporary serial ports which only require one data line. There are many types of parallel ports, but the term has become most closely associated with the printer port or Centronics
Centronics
port found on most personal computers from the 1970s through the 2000s
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MIDI
MIDI
MIDI
(/ˈmɪdi/; short for Musical Instrument Digital Interface) is a technical standard that describes a communications protocol, digital interface, and electrical connectors that interconnects a wide variety of electronic musical instruments, computers, and related music and audio devices.[1] A single MIDI
MIDI
link can carry up to sixteen channels of information, each of which can be routed to a separate device. MIDI
MIDI
carries event messages that specify notation, pitch and velocity (loudness or softness), control signals for parameters such as volume, vibrato, audio panning from left to right, cues in theatre, and clock signals that set and synchronize tempo between multiple devices. These messages transmit via a MIDI
MIDI
cable to other devices, where they control sound generation and other features
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Modem
A modem (modulator–demodulator) is a network hardware device that modulates one or more carrier wave signals to encode digital information for transmission and demodulates signals to decode the transmitted information. The goal is to produce a signal that can be transmitted easily and decoded to reproduce the original digital data. Modems can be used with any means of transmitting analog signals, from light-emitting diodes to radio. A common type of modem is one that turns the digital data of a computer into modulated electrical signal for transmission over telephone lines and demodulated by another modem at the receiver side to recover the digital data. Modems are generally classified by the maximum amount of data they can send in a given unit of time, usually expressed in bits per second (symbol bit(s), sometimes abbreviated "bps"), or bytes per second (symbol B(s)). Modems can also be classified by their symbol rate, measured in baud
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Sampling (signal Processing)
In signal processing, sampling is the reduction of a continuous-time signal to a discrete-time signal
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Universal Serial Bus
USB, short for Universal Serial Bus, is an industry standard that was developed to define cables, connectors and protocols for connection, communication, and power supply between personal computers and their peripheral devices. [3] USB
USB
was designed to standardize the connection of computer peripherals (including keyboards, pointing devices, digital cameras, printers, portable media players, disk drives and network adapters) to personal computers, both to communicate and to supply electric power. It has largely replaced interfaces such as serial ports and parallel ports, and has become commonplace on a wide range of devices
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Desktop Video
Desktop video refers to a phenomenon lasting from the mid-1980s to the early 1990s when the graphics capabilities of personal computers such as Commodore's Amiga, the Apple Macintosh II and specially-upgraded IBM PC compatibles had advanced to the point where individuals and local broadcasters could use them for analog non-linear editing (NLE) and vision mixing in video production. Despite the use of computers, desktop video should not be confused with digital video since the video data remained analog. Full-screen, full-motion video's vast storage requirements meant that the promise of digital encoding would not be realized on desktop computers for at least another decade. Description[edit] There were multiple models of genlock cards available to synchronise the content; the Newtek Video Toaster was commonly used in Amiga and PC systems, while Mac systems had the SuperMac Video Spigot and Radius VideoVision cards
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Personal Computer
A personal computer (PC) is a multi-purpose computer whose size, capabilities, and price make it feasible for individual use. PCs are intended to be operated directly by an end user, rather than by a computer expert or technician. Computer
Computer
time-sharing models that were typically used with larger, more expensive minicomputer and mainframe systems, to enable them be used by many people at the same time, are not used with PCs. Early computer owners in the 1960s, invariably institutional or corporate, had to write their own programs to do any useful work with the machines
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Standard-definition
Standard-definition television (SDTV or SD) is a television system which uses a resolution that's not considered to be either high-definition television (720p, 1080i, 1080p, 1440p, 4K UHDTV, and 8K UHD) or enhanced-definition television (EDTV 480p). The two common SDTV signal types are 576i, with 576 interlaced lines of resolution, derived from the European-developed PAL and SECAM systems; and 480i based on the American National Television System Committee NTSC system. SDTV and high definition television (HDTV) are the two categories of display formats for digital television (DTV) transmissions, which are becoming the standard. In North America, digital SDTV is broadcast in the same 4:3 aspect ratio as NTSC signals with widescreen content being center cut.[1] However, in other parts of the world that used the PAL or SECAM color systems, standard-definition television is now usually shown with a 16:9 aspect ratio, with the transition occurring between the mid-1990s and mid-2000s
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Broadcast Quality
Broadcast quality is a term stemming from quad videotape to denote the quality achieved by professional video cameras and time base correctors (TBC) used for broadcast television, usually in standard definition. As the standards for commercial television broadcasts have changed from analog television using analog video to digital television using digital video, the term has generally fallen out of use.[1][2] Manufacturers have used it to describe both professional and prosumer or "Semi-Professional" devices. A camera with the minimum requirements typically being the inclusion of three CCDs and relatively low-compression analog recording or digital recording capability with little or no chroma subsampling, and the ability to be genlocked. The advantages of three CCDs include better color definition in shadows, better overall low-light sensitivity, and reduced noise when compared to single-CCD systems
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