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American Journal Of Sociology
Established in 1895 as the first US scholarly journal in its field, American Journal of Sociology
Sociology
(AJS) presents pathbreaking work from all areas of sociology, with an emphasis on theory building and innovative methods. AJS strives to speak to the general sociology reader and is open to contributions from across the social sciences—political science, economics, history, anthropology, and statistics in addition to sociology—that seriously engage the sociological literature to forge new ways of understanding the social. AJS offers a substantial book review section that identifies the most salient work of both emerging and enduring scholars of social science. Commissioned review essays appear occasionally, offering the readers a comparative, in-depth examination of prominent titles.Contents1 Past editors 2 Roger V
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ISO 4
ISO 4 (Information and documentation – Rules for the abbreviation of title words and titles of publications) is an international standard which defines a uniform system for the abbreviation of serial titles, i.e., titles of publications such as scientific journals that are published in regular installments.[1] The ISSN
ISSN
International Centre, which the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO) has appointed as the registration authority for ISO 4, maintains the "List of Title Word Abbreviations" (LTWA), which contains standard abbreviations for words commonly found in serial titles. As of August 2017, the standard's most recent update came in 1997[2], when its third edition was released.[3] One major use of ISO 4 is to abbreviate the names of scientific journals using the List of Title Word Abbreviations (LTWA)
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Statistics
Statistics
Statistics
is a branch of mathematics dealing with the collection, analysis, interpretation, presentation, and organization of data.[1][2] In applying statistics to, for example, a scientific, industrial, or social problem, it is conventional to begin with a statistical population or a statistical model process to be studied. Populations can be diverse topics such as "all people living in a country" or "every atom composing a crystal". Statistics
Statistics
deals with all aspects of data including the planning of data collection in terms of the design of surveys and experiments.[1] See glossary of probability and statistics. When census data cannot be collected, statisticians collect data by developing specific experiment designs and survey samples. Representative sampling assures that inferences and conclusions can reasonably extend from the sample to the population as a whole
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Marta Tienda
Marta Tienda is a sociologist. From 1997 to 2001, she served as the director of the Office of Population Research
Office of Population Research
at Princeton University.[1] She is the co-author and co-editor of many books, including The Hispanic Population of The United States (1987).[2] References[edit]^ "A moment with ... Marta Tienda". Princeton Alumni Weekly. January 13, 2010. Retrieved December 9, 2011.  ^ The Hispanic population of the United States. Google Books. This biography of an American sociologist is a stub
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William Parish
William Okes Parish (called "Archdeacon Okes Parish" – so either Okes was his given name or he used Okes-Parish as a surname) was Archdeacon of Dorset from 1929 to 1936.[1] Born into an ecclesiastical family [2] on 26 June 1859, he was educated at Peterhouse, Cambridge [3] and ordained in 1884.[4] He was Vicar of Longfleet from 1886[5] to[6] 1929; Rural Dean of Poole from 1893[7] to 1929; and a Canon Residentiary of Salisbury Cathedral from 1929 to 1936.[8] He was also a Chaplain to the Dorset Regiment.[9] He died on 7 April 1940.[10] Notes[edit]^ 'Obituary section' Crockford's Clerical Directory 1940-41 Oxford, OUP,1941 ^ He was the elder son of The Reverend William Samuel Parish, MA, Fellow of Peterhouse ‘PARISH, Ven. William Okes’, Who Was Who, A & C Black, 1920–2008; online edn, Oxford University Press, Dec 2007 accessed 23 Nov 2012 ^ University Intelligence MA awards (Cambridge) The Times (London, England), Friday, May 29, 1885; pg
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Frederick Starr
Frederick Starr
Frederick Starr
(September 2, 1858 – August 14, 1933) was an American academic, anthropologist, and "populist educator"[1] born at Auburn, New York. As he was avid collector of charms (ofuda) and votive slips (senjafuda or nōsatsu) he was called Dr. Ofuda
Ofuda
(お札博士, Ofuda
Ofuda
Hakushi) in Japan.[2] He sold much of this collection to art collector and museum specialist Gertrude Bass Warner, and it currently resides at the Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art at the University of Oregon and the University of Oregon Knight Library Special
Special
Collections & University Archives.[3]Contents1 Biography 2 Honors 3 Selected works 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksBiography[edit] Starr earned an undergraduate degree at the University of Rochester (1882) and a doctorate in geology at Lafayette College
Lafayette College
(1885)
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Outline Of Academic Disciplines
An academic discipline or field of study is a branch of knowledge that is taught and researched as part of higher education. A scholar's discipline is commonly defined by the university faculties and learned societies to which he or she belongs and the academic journals in which he or she publishes research. Disciplines vary between well-established ones that exist in almost all universities and have well-defined rosters of journals and conferences and nascent ones supported by only a few universities and publications
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William Fielding Ogburn
William Fielding Ogburn (June 29, 1886 – April 27, 1959) was an American sociologist who was born in Butler, Georgia and died in Tallahassee, Florida. He was also a statistician and an educator. Ogburn received his B.A. degree from Mercer University and his M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Columbia University.[1] He was a professor of sociology at Columbia from 1919 until 1927, when he became chair of the Sociology Department at the University of Chicago. He served as the president of American Sociological Society in 1929. He was the editor of the Journal of the American Statistical Association from 1920 to 1926. In 1931, he was elected as the president of American Statistical Association, which also elected him as a Fellow in 1920.[2] He was also known for his idea of "culture lag" in society's adjustment to technological and other changes. This concept is mentioned in the book Future Shock, by Alvin Toffler
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Robert Redfield
Robert Redfield (December 4, 1897 – October 16, 1958) was an American anthropologist and ethnolinguist, whose ethnographic work in Tepoztlán, Mexico is considered a landmark Latin American ethnography.[1] He was associated with the University of Chicago for his entire career: all of his higher education took place at Chicago, and he then joined Chicago as faculty in 1927 and remained there until his death in 1958, serving as Dean of Social Sciences from 1934-1946.[2]Contents1 Career 2 Personal life 3 Published works 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksCareer[edit] In 1923 he and his wife Margaret traveled to Mexico, where he met Manuel Gamio, a Mexican anthropologist who had studies with Franz Boas. Redfield graduated from the University of Chicago with Communication Studies, eventually with a J.D. from its law school and then a Ph.D. in cultural anthropology, which he began to teach in 1927
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Digital Object Identifier
In computing, a Digital Object Identifier or DOI is a persistent identifier or handle used to uniquely identify objects, standardized by the International Organization for Standardization
International Organization for Standardization
(ISO).[1] An implementation of the Handle System,[2][3] DOIs are in wide use mainly to identify academic, professional, and government information, such as journal articles, research reports and data sets, and official publications though they also have been used to identify other types of information resources, such as commercial videos. A DOI aims to be "resolvable", usually to some form of access to the information object to which the DOI refers. This is achieved by binding the DOI to metadata about the object, such as a URL, indicating where the object can be found. Thus, by being actionable and interoperable, a DOI differs from identifiers such as ISBNs and ISRCs which aim only to uniquely identify their referents
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Ellsworth Faris
Ellsworth Faris (September 30, 1874 – December 19, 1953) was an influential sociologist of the Chicago school. Faris was born in 1874 in Salem, Tennessee.[1] He studied at Texas Christian University, where he earned his bachelor's degree in 1894 and master's degree in 1896.[1] From 1897 to 1904, he spent time in Belgian Congo as a missionary.[2] When he returned from Africa, Faris earned his Ph.D. at the University of Chicago, and was hired into the department. Faris was chair of the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at the University of Chicago, and served as president of the American Sociological Society in 1937. Among his works, Faris authored The Nature of Human Nature in 1937. References[edit]^ a b "Ellsworth Faris". American Sociological Society. Archived from the original on 2006-09-27.  ^ "Obituary of Ellsworth Faris" (PDF)
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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Book Review
A book review is a form of literary criticism in which a book is analyzed based on content, style, and merit.[1] A book review may be a primary source, opinion piece, summary review or scholarly review.[2] Books can be reviewed for printed periodicals, magazines and newspapers, as school work, or for book web sites on the Internet. A book review's length may vary from a single paragraph to a substantial essay. Such a review may evaluate the book on the basis of personal taste
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Anthropology
Anthropology
Anthropology
is the study of humans and human behaviour and societies in the past and present.[1][2][3] Social anthropology
Social anthropology
and cultural anthropology[1][2][3] study the norms and values of societies.
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History
—George Santayana History
History
(from Greek ἱστορία, historia, meaning "inquiry, knowledge acquired by investigation")[2] is the study of the past as it is described in written documents.[3][4] Events occurring before written record are considered prehistory. It is an umbrella term that relates to past events as well as the memory, discovery, collection, organization, presentation, and interpretation of information about these events
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Economics
Economics
Economics
(/ɛkəˈnɒmɪks, iːkə-/)[1][2][3] is the social science that studies the production, distribution, and consumption of goods and services.[4] Economics
Economics
focuses on the behaviour and interactions of economic agents and how economies work. Microeconomics
Microeconomics
analyzes basic elements in the economy, including individual agents and markets, their interactions, and the outcomes of interactions. Individual agents may include, for example, households, firms, buyers, and sellers. Macroeconomics analyzes the entire economy (meaning aggregated production, consumption, savings, and investment) and issues affecting it, including unemployment of resources (labour, capital, and land), inflation, economic growth, and the public policies that address these issues (monetary, fiscal, and other policies)
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