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American Federation Of Teachers
The American Federation of Teachers
American Federation of Teachers
(AFT) is an American labor union that primarily represents teachers
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Ambassadors Of The United States
This is a list of ambassadors of the United States
United States
of America to individual nations of the world, to international organizations, and to past nations, as well as ambassadors-at-large.[1][2] The ambassadors are nominated by the President and confirmed by the United States
United States
Senate.[3] An ambassador can be appointed during a recess, but he or she can only serve as ambassador until the end of the next session of Congress unless subsequently confirmed.[4] Ambassadors serve "at the pleasure of the President", meaning they can be dismissed at any time. An ambassador may be a career Foreign Service Officer (career diplomat - CD) or a political appointee (PA). In most cases, career foreign service officers serve a tour of approximately three years per ambassadorship whereas political appointees customarily tender their resignations upon the inauguration of a new president
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African-Americans
Origins of the civil rights movement
Origins of the civil rights movement
· Civil rights movement
Civil rights movement
· Black Power movementPost–civil rights era New Great MigrationCultureStudies Art Business history Black conductors Black mecca Black sc
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African-American Teachers
African-American teachers educated African Americans
African Americans
and taught each other to read during slavery in the South. Slaves ran small schools in secret, since teaching a slave to read was a crime (see Slave codes). While, in the North, African Americans
African Americans
worked alongside with Whites. Many privileged African Americans
African Americans
in the North wanted their children taught with White children, and were pro-integration. The Black middle class preferred segregation. During the post-Reconstruction era African Americans
African Americans
built their own schools so they didn't have White control.[1] The Black middle class believed that it could provide quality education for their community. This resulted in the foundation of teaching as a profession for Blacks. Some Black families had multiple individuals who dedicated their lives to teaching
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Amicus Curiae
An amicus curiae (literally, "friend of the court"; plural, amici curiae) is someone who is not a party to a case and may or may not have been solicited by a party, who assists a court by offering information, expertise, or insight that has a bearing on the issues in the case, and is typically presented in the form of a brief. The decision on whether to consider an amicus brief lies within the discretion of the court. The phrase amicus curiae is legal Latin.Contents1 History 2 Presentation 3 United States
United States
Supreme Court
Court
rules 4 In the World Trade Organization4.1 Panel and Appellate Body reports5 See also 6 References 7 External linksHistory[edit] The amicus curiae figure originates in Roman law.[1] Starting in the 9th century,[citation needed] it was incorporated into English law, and it was later extended to most common law systems
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Supreme Court Of The United States
The Supreme Court of the United States
United States
(sometimes colloquially referred to by the acronym SCOTUS[2]) is the highest federal court of the United States. Established pursuant to Article Three of the United States Constitution in 1789, it has ultimate (and largely discretionary) appellate jurisdiction over all federal courts and state court cases involving issues of federal law plus original jurisdiction over a small range of cases. In the legal system of the United States, the Supreme Court is generally the final interpreter of federal law including the United States
United States
Constitution, but it may act only within the context of a case in which it has jurisdiction
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Brown V. Board Of Education
Brown v. Board of Education
Brown v. Board of Education
of Topeka, 347 U.S. 483 (1954), was a landmark United States Supreme Court case in which the Court declared state laws establishing separate public schools for black and white students to be unconstitutional. The decision effectively overturned the Plessy v. Ferguson
Plessy v. Ferguson
decision of 1896, which allowed state-sponsored segregation, insofar as it applied to public education. Handed down on May 17, 1954, the Warren Court's unanimous (9–0) decision stated that "separate educational facilities are inherently unequal." As a result, de jure racial segregation was ruled a violation of the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment of the United States Constitution
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March On Washington For Jobs And Freedom
The March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom, the March on Washington, or The Great March on Washington,[1][2] was held in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday, August 28, 1963. The purpose of the march was to advocate for the civil and economic rights of African Americans. At the march, Martin Luther King Jr., standing in front of the Lincoln Memorial, delivered his historic "I Have a Dream" speech in which he called for an end to racism.[3] The march was organized by A
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Collective Bargaining
Collective bargaining
Collective bargaining
within a labor union is a process of negotiation between employers and a group of employees aimed at agreements to regulate working salaries, working conditions, benefits, and other aspects of workers' compensation and rights for workers to secure full-time employment. The interests of the employees are commonly presented by representatives of a trade union to which the employees belong. The collective agreements reached by these negotiations usually set out wage scales, working hours, training, health and safety, overtime, grievance mechanisms, and rights to participate in workplace or company affairs.[1] The union may negotiate with a single employer (who is typically representing a company's shareholders) or may negotiate with a group of businesses, depending on the country, to reach an industry-wide agreement. A collective agreement functions as a labour contract between an employer and one or more unions
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Waiting For "Superman"
Waiting for "Superman" is a 2010 American documentary film directed by Davis Guggenheim and produced by Lesley Chilcott.[2] The film criticizes the American public education system by following several students as they strive to be accepted into a charter school. The film received the Audience Award for best documentary at the 2010 Sundance Film Festival.[3] The film also received the Best Documentary Feature at the Critics' Choice Movie Awards.[4][5]Contents1 Synopsis 2 Details2.1 Cast 2.2 Release 2.3 Title3 Critical and media reception 4 Educational reception and allegations of inaccuracy 5 Book release 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksSynopsis[edit] Geoffrey Canada describes his journey as an educator and his surprise when he realizes upon entering adulthood that Superman is a fictional character and that no one is powerful enough to save us all. Throughout the documentary, different aspects of the American public education system are examined
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Charter School
A charter school is a school that receives government funding but operates independently of the established state school system in which it is located.[1][2] Charter schools are an example of public asset privatization. There is ongoing debate on whether charter schools should be described as private schools or state schools.[3] Advocates of the charter model state that they are public schools because they are open to all students and do not charge tuition, while critics cite charter schools' private operation and looser regulations regarding public accountability and labor issues as arguments against.[3]Contents1 By country1.1 Australia 1.2 Canada 1.3 Chile 1.4 Colombia 1.5 England
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Ralph Bunche
Ralph Johnson Bunche (/bʌntʃ/; August 7, 1904[1][2][3]  – December 9, 1971) was an American political scientist, academic, and diplomat who received the 1950 Nobel Peace Prize
Nobel Peace Prize
for his late 1940s mediation in Israel.[2] He was the first African American to be so honored in the history of the prize.[4] He was involved in the formation and administration of the United Nations. In 1963, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom
Presidential Medal of Freedom
by President John F. Kennedy. For more than two decades (1928 to 1950), Bunche served as chair of the Department of Political Science at Howard University, where he also taught generations of students
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Barack Obama
Pre-presidency Illinois
Illinois
State Senator 2004 DNC keynote address U.S
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Under-Secretary-General Of The United Nations
An Under- Secretary-General of the United Nations
Secretary-General of the United Nations
(USG) is a senior official within the United Nations
United Nations
System, normally appointed by the General Assembly on the recommendation of the Secretary-General for a renewable term of four years. Under- Secretary-General is the third highest rank in the United Nations, after the Secretary-General and the Deputy Secretary-General. The rank is held by the heads of different UN entities, certain high officials of the United Nations Secretariat, and high-level envoys
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Nobel Peace Prize
The Nobel Peace
Peace
Prize (Swedish: Nobels fredspris) is one of the five Nobel Prizes created by the Swedish industrialist, inventor, and armaments manufacturer Alfred Nobel, along with the prizes in Chemistry, Physics, Physiology or Medicine, and Literature. Since March 1901,[3] it has been awarded annually (with some exceptions) to those who have "done the most or the best work for fraternity between nations, for the abolition or reduction of standing armies and for the holding and promotion of peace congresses".[4] As per Alfred Nobel's will, the recipient is selected by the Norwegian Nobel Committee, a five-member committee appointed by the Parliament of Norway. Since 1990, the prize is awarded on 10 December in Oslo City Hall each year
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