HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

American Express
The American Express
American Express
Company, also known as Amex, is an American multinational financial services corporation headquartered in Three World Financial Center in New York City
[...More...]

"American Express" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

List Of Business Entities
A business entity is an entity that is formed and administered as per corporate law in order to engage in business activities, charitable work, or other activities allowable. Most often, business entities are formed to sell a product or a service. There are many types of business entities defined in the legal systems of various countries. These include corporations, cooperatives, partnerships, sole traders, limited liability company and other specifically permitted and labelled types of entities. The specific rules vary by country and by state or province
[...More...]

"List Of Business Entities" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Logo
A logo (abbreviation of logotype,[2] from Greek: λόγος logos "word" and τύπος typos "imprint") is a graphic mark, emblem, or symbol used to aid and promote public recognition. It may be of an abstract or figurative design or include the text of the name it represents as in a logotype or wordmark. In the days of hot metal typesetting, a logotype was one word cast as a single piece of type (e.g. "The" in ATF Garamond, as opposed to a ligature, which is two or more letters joined, but not forming a word).[3] By extension, the term was also used for a uniquely set and arranged typeface or colophon
[...More...]

"Logo" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Earnings Before Interest And Taxes
In accounting and finance, earnings before interest and taxes (EBIT), is a measure of a firm's profit that includes all expenses except interest and income tax expenses.[1] It is the difference between operating revenues and operating expenses. When a firm does not have non-operating income, operating income is sometimes used as a synonym for EBIT and operating profit.[2]EBIT = revenue – operating expenses (OPEX)Operating income = revenue – operating expenses[1] A professional investor contemplating a change to the capital structure of a firm (e.g., through a leveraged buyout) first evaluates a firm's fundamental earnings potential (reflected by earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation and amortization (EBITDA) and EBIT), and then determines the optimal use of debt vs. equity. To calculate EBIT, expenses (e.g
[...More...]

"Earnings Before Interest And Taxes" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Public Company
A public company, publicly traded company, publicly held company, publicly listed company, or public corporation is a corporation whose ownership is dispersed among the general public in many shares of stock which are freely traded on a stock exchange or in over the counter markets. In some jurisdictions, public companies over a certain size must be listed on an exchange
[...More...]

"Public Company" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Asset
In financial accounting, an asset is an economic resource. Anything tangible or intangible that can be owned or controlled to produce value and that is held by a company to produce positive economic value is an asset. Simply stated, assets represent value of ownership that can be converted into cash (although cash itself is also considered an asset).[1] The balance sheet of a firm records the monetary[2] value of the assets owned by that firm. It covers money and other valuables belonging to an individual or to a business.[1] One can classify assets into two major asset classes: tangible assets and intangible assets. Tangible assets contain various subclasses, including current assets and fixed assets.[3] Current assets include inventory, while fixed assets include such items as buildings and equipment.[4] Intangible assets are nonphysical resources and rights that have a value to the firm because they give the firm some kind of advantage in the marketplace
[...More...]

"Asset" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Equity (finance)
In accounting, equity (or owner's equity) is the difference between the value of the assets and the value of the liabilities of something owned. It is governed by the following equation: Equity = Assets − Liabilities displaystyle text Equity = text Assets - text Liabilities For example, if someone owns a car worth $15,000 (an asset), but owes $5,000 on a loan against that car (a liability), the car represents $10,000 of equity. Equity can be negative if liabilities exceed assets. Shareholders' equity (or stockholders' equity, shareholders' funds, shareholders' capital or similar terms) represents the equity of a company as divided among shareholders of common or preferred stock. Negative shareholders' equity is often referred to as a shareholders' deficit. Alternatively, equity can also refer to the capital stock of a corporation. The value of the stock depends on the corporation's future economic prospects
[...More...]

"Equity (finance)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Multinational Corporation
A multinational corporation (MNC) or worldwide enterprise[5] is a corporate organization that owns or controls production of goods or services in at least one country other than its home country.[6] A multinational corporation can also be referred to as a multinational enterprise (MNE), a transnational enterprise (TNE), a transnational corporation (TNC), an international corporation, or a stateless corporation.[7] There are subtle but real differences between these three labels, as well as multinational corporation and worldwide enterprise. Multinational corporations are subject to criticisms for lacking ethical standards, and that this shows up in how they evade ethical laws and leverage their own business agenda with capital, and even the military backing of their own wealthy host nation-states.Contents1 Overview 2 Theoretical background 3 Transnational corporations 4 Multinational enterprise 5
[...More...]

"Multinational Corporation" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Interbrand
Jez Frampton, Global CEO, Andy Payne, Global Chief Creative Officer, Stuart Green, CEO Asia Pacific, Gonzalo Brujó, CEO EMEA & LatAm,Services Strategy, Valuation, Design, Analytics, Naming, DigitalParent Omnicom
Omnicom
GroupWebsite www.interbrand.comInterbrand, a division of Omnicom, is a brand consultancy, specializing in areas such as brand strategy, brand analytics, brand valuation, corporate design, digital brand management, packaging design, and naming. Interbrand
Interbrand
has 24 offices in 17 countries.[1]Contents1 History 2 Best Global Brands2.1 Methodology3 Client roster 4 Awards 5 ReferencesHistory[edit] Interbrand
Interbrand
was founded by John Murphy, a native of Essex in the United Kingdom
[...More...]

"Interbrand" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Fortune (magazine)
Fortune is a multinational business magazine, published and owned by Meredith Corporation
Meredith Corporation
and headquartered in New York City. The publication was founded by Henry Luce
Henry Luce
in 1929
[...More...]

"Fortune (magazine)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Gladiator
A gladiator (Latin: gladiator, "swordsman", from gladius, "sword") was an armed combatant who entertained audiences in the Roman Republic
Roman Republic
and Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in violent confrontations with other gladiators, wild animals, and condemned criminals. Some gladiators were volunteers who risked their lives and their legal and social standing by appearing in the arena. Most were despised as slaves, schooled under harsh conditions, socially marginalized, and segregated even in death. Irrespective of their origin, gladiators offered spectators an example of Rome's martial ethics and, in fighting or dying well, they could inspire admiration and popular acclaim. They were celebrated in high and low art, and their value as entertainers was commemorated in precious and commonplace objects throughout the Roman world. The origin of gladiatorial combat is open to debate
[...More...]

"Gladiator" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Travel
Travel
Travel
is the movement of people between relatively distant geographical locations, and can involve travel by foot, bicycle, automobile, train, boat, bus, airplane, or other means, with or without luggage, and can be one way or round trip.[1][2] Travel
Travel
can also include relatively short stays between successive movements.Contents1 Etymology 2 Purpose and motivation 3 Geographic types 4 History of travel 5 Travel
Travel
safety 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksEtymology The origin of the word "travel" is most likely lost to history. The term "travel" may originate from the Old French
Old French
word travail, which means 'work'.[3] According to the Merriam Webster dictionary, the first known use of the word travel was in the 14th century
[...More...]

"Travel" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Centurion
A centurion (Latin: centurio; Greek: κεντυρίων, kentyríōn, or ἑκατόνταρχος, hekatóntarkhos) was a professional officer of the Roman army
Roman army
after the Marian reforms
Marian reforms
of 107 BC. Most centurions commanded groups of centuries of around 80 legionaries [5] but senior centurions commanded cohorts or took senior staff roles in their legion. Centurions were also found in the Roman navy
[...More...]

"Centurion" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Receipt
A receipt (also known as a bill of parcel, unpacking note, packaging slip, (delivery) docket, shipping list, packing list, packing slip, delivery list, manifest or customer receipt),[1][2][3] is a document acknowledging that a person has received money or property in payment following a sale or other transfer of goods or provision of a service. All receipt must have the date of purchase on them. If the recipient of the payment is legally required to collect sales tax or VAT from the customer, the amount would be added to the receipt and the collection would be deemed to have been on behalf of the relevant tax authority. In many countries, a retailer is required to include the sales tax or VAT in the displayed price of goods sold, from which the tax amount would be calculated at point of sale and remitted to the tax authorities in due course. Similarly, amounts may be deducted from amounts payable, as in the case of wage withholding taxes
[...More...]

"Receipt" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Express Mail
Express mail is an accelerated mail delivery service for which the customer pays a surcharge and receives faster delivery. Express mail is a service for domestic and international mail and is in most countries governed by a country's own postal administration. Since 1998, the international accelerated delivery services are governed by the EMS Cooperative.Contents1 Express Mail Service and the EMS Cooperative 2 EMS Cooperative members 3 Other express mail providers 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksExpress Mail Service and the EMS Cooperative[edit]Express Mail Service (EMS) service logoExpress Mail Service (EMS) is an international express postal service offered by postal-administration members of the Universal Postal Union (UPU)
[...More...]

"Express Mail" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Hudson Street (Manhattan)
Hudson may refer to:Contents1 People 2 Places2.1 Argentina 2.2 Canada 2.3 United States2.3.1 Communities3 Geographical features 4 Transport 5 Arts and entertainment 6 Companies 7 Computing 8 Other 9 See alsoPeople[edit]Hudson (surname) Hudson (given name)Places[edit] Argentina[edit]Hudson, Buenos Aires Province, a town in Berazategui PartidoCanada[edit]Hudson, Ontario Hudson, QuebecUnited States[edit] Communities[edit]Hudson, Colorado, a town in Weld County Hudson, Florida, a census-designated place in Pasco County Hudson, Illinois, a town in McLean County Hudson, Indiana, a town in Steuben County Hudson, Iowa, a town in Black Hawk County Hudson, Kansas, a town in Stafford County Hudson, Maine, a town in Penobscot County Hudson, Massachusetts, a town in Middlesex County Hudson, Michigan, a town in Lenawee County Hudson, Missouri, an unincorporated community Hudson, New Hampshire, a town in Hillsb
[...More...]

"Hudson Street (Manhattan)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.