HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Alun Hoddinott
Alun Hoddinott
Alun Hoddinott
CBE (11 August 1929 – 11 March 2008) was a Welsh composer of classical music, one of the first to receive international recognition.[1]Contents1 Life and works 2 Chronological worklist 3 References 4 Bibliography 5 External linksLife and works[edit] Hoddinott was born in Bargoed, Glamorganshire, Wales.[1] He was educated at Gowerton Grammar school before matriculating to University College, Cardiff,[1] and later studied privately with Arthur Benjamin.[2] His first major composition, the Clarinet Concerto, was performed at the Cheltenham Festival
Cheltenham Festival
of 1954 by Gervase de Peyer with the Hallé Orchestra and Sir John Barbirolli. This brought Hoddinott a national profile, which was followed by a string of commissions by leading orchestras and soloists
[...More...]

"Alun Hoddinott" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Order Of The British Empire
The Most Excellent Order of the British Empire
British Empire
is a British order of chivalry, rewarding contributions to the arts and sciences, work with charitable and welfare organisations, and public service outside the Civil service.[2] It was established on 4 June 1917 by King George V, and comprises five classes across both civil and military divisions, the most senior two of which make the recipient either a knight if male or dame if female.[3] There is also the related British Empire Medal, whose recipients are affiliated with, but not members of, the order. Recommendations for appointments to the Order of the British Empire were at first made on the nomination of the United Kingdom, the self-governing Dominions
Dominions
of the Empire (later Commonwealth) and the Viceroy of India
[...More...]

"Order Of The British Empire" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Opera
Opera
Opera
(Italian: [ˈɔːpera]; English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere [ˈɔːpere]) is an art form in which singers and musicians perform a dramatic work combining text (libretto) and musical score, usually in a theatrical setting.[1] In traditional opera, singers do two types of singing: recitative, a speech-inflected style[2] and arias, a more melodic style, in which notes are sung in a sustained fashion. Opera
Opera
incorporates many of the elements of spoken theatre, such as acting, scenery, and costumes and sometimes includes dance
[...More...]

"Opera" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Symphony
A symphony is an extended musical composition in Western classical music, most often written by composers for orchestra. Although the term has had many meanings from its origins in the ancient Greek era, by the late 18th century the word had taken on the meaning common today: a work usually consisting of multiple distinct sections or movements, often four, with the first movement in sonata form. Symphonies are scored for string (violin, viola, cello, and double bass), brass, woodwind, and percussion instruments which altogether number about 30–100 musicians. Symphonies are notated in a musical score, which contains all the instrument parts. Orchestral musicians play from parts which contain just the notated music for their instrument
[...More...]

"Symphony" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Sonata
Sonata
Sonata
(/səˈnɑːtə/; Italian: [soˈnaːta], pl. sonate; from Latin and Italian: sonare, "to sound"), in music, literally means a piece played as opposed to a cantata (Latin and Italian cantare, "to sing"), a piece sung. The term evolved through the history of music, designating a variety of forms until the Classical era, when it took on increasing importance, and is vague. By the early 19th century, it came to represent a principle of composing large-scale works. It was applied to most instrumental genres and regarded—alongside the fugue—as one of two fundamental methods of organizing, interpreting and analyzing concert music. Though the musical style of sonatas has changed since the Classical era, most 20th- and 21st-century sonatas still maintain the same structure. The term sonatina, pl
[...More...]

"Sonata" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Concerto
A concerto (/kənˈtʃɛərtoʊ/; plural concertos, or concerti from the Italian plural) is a musical composition usually composed in three movements, in which, usually, one solo instrument (for instance, a piano, violin, cello or flute) is accompanied by an orchestra or concert band. It is accepted that its characteristics and definition have changed over time. In the 17th century, sacred works for voices and orchestra were typically called concertos,[1] as reflected by J. S
[...More...]

"Concerto" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Serialism
In music, serialism is a method or technique of composition that uses a series of values to manipulate different musical elements. Serialism began primarily with Arnold Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique, though some of his contemporaries were also working to establish serialism as a form of post-tonal thinking. Twelve-tone technique
Twelve-tone technique
orders the twelve notes of the chromatic scale, forming a row or series and providing a unifying basis for a composition's melody, harmony, structural progressions, and variations. Other types of serialism also work with sets, collections of objects, but not necessarily with fixed-order series, and extend the technique to other musical dimensions (often called "parameters"), such as duration, dynamics, and timbre
[...More...]

"Serialism" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Alan Rawsthorne
Alan Rawsthorne (2 May 1905 – 24 July 1971) was a British composer. He was born in Haslingden, Lancashire, and is buried in Thaxted churchyard in Essex.Contents1 Early years 2 Career 3 Family 4 Compositions4.1 Ballet 4.2 Orchestral 4.3 Concertante 4.4 Chamber 4.5 Instrumental 4.6 Piano 4.7 Vocal orchestral 4.8 Choral 4.9 Vocal5 References 6 External linksEarly years[edit] Alan Rawsthorne was born in Deardengate House, Haslingden, Lancashire (Anon. 2015a), to Hubert Rawsthorne (1868–1943), a well-off medical doctor, and his wife, Janet Bridge (1877/8–1927) (McCabe 2004). Despite what appears to have been a happy and affectionate family life with his parents and elder sister, Barbara (the only sibling), in beautiful Lancashire countryside, as a boy Rawsthorne suffered from fragile health (McCabe 2004; Green 1971)
[...More...]

"Alan Rawsthorne" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Béla Bartók
Béla Viktor János Bartók (/ˈbeɪlə ˈbɑːrtɒk/; Hungarian: [ˈbeːlɒ ˈbɒrtoːk]; 25 March 1881 – 26 September 1945) was a Hungarian composer, pianist and an ethnomusicologist. He is considered one of the most important composers of the 20th century; he and Liszt are regarded as Hungary's greatest composers (Gillies 2001)
[...More...]

"Béla Bartók" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Palindrome
A palindrome is a word, phrase, number, or other sequence of characters which reads the same backward as forward, such as madam or racecar
[...More...]

"Palindrome" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

James Joyce
James Augustine[1] Aloysius Joyce (2 February 1882 – 13 January 1941) was an Irish novelist, short story writer, and poet. He contributed to the modernist avant-garde and is regarded as one of the most influential and important authors of the 20th century. Joyce is best known for Ulysses (1922), a landmark work in which the episodes of Homer's Odyssey
Odyssey
are paralleled in a variety of literary styles, perhaps most prominently stream of consciousness. Other well-known works are the short-story collection Dubliners
Dubliners
(1914), and the novels A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man
(1916) and Finnegans Wake (1939). His other writings include three books of poetry, a play, his published letters and occasional journalism. Joyce was born in 41 Brighton Square, Rathgar, Dublin, into a middle-class family on the way down
[...More...]

"James Joyce" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Euphonium
Wind, brass Aerophone Hornbostel–Sachs classification 423.232 (Valved aerophone sounded by lip movement)Developed 1840s from the ophicleidePlaying range(A1) B♭1–E5 (A5)This image represents the range for the instrument as it is commonly played.Related instrumentsSaxhornsFlugelhorn Alto horn Baritone
Baritone
horn Mellop
[...More...]

"Euphonium" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

Jeffrey Lewis (composer)
Jeffrey Lewis (born 28 November 1942) is a Welsh composer. Biography and work[edit] Lewis studied at the University of Wales, Cardiff; with György Ligeti and Karlheinz Stockhausen at Darmstadt; with Bogusław Schaeffer in Krakow and with Don Banks in London. He taught at Leeds College of Music (1969 - 72) and the University of Wales, Bangor (1973 - 1992). Early performances included Fanfares with Variations and the Chamber Concerto with the BBC Welsh Orchestra under John Carewe, and, at the 1967 Cheltenham Festival, his Two Cadenzas for piano and Epitaphium - Children of the Sun for narrator, chamber choir, piano, flute, clarinet and percussion. BBC commissions include the orchestral works Mutations I (1969), Aurora (1973), Scenario (1975), Praeludium (1975), Memoria (1978) and Limina Lucis (1982)
[...More...]

"Jeffrey Lewis (composer)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Royal Academy Of Music
The Royal Academy of Music
Royal Academy of Music
in London, England, is the oldest conservatoire in the UK, founded in 1822[2] and receiving its Royal Charter in 1830.[3] It is one of the leading conservatoires in the world, coming top of the Complete University Guide for 2018[4] and Guardian University Guide for 2018.[5] Famous Academy alumni include Sir Simon Rattle, Sir Harrison Birtwistle, Sir Elton John
Elton John
and Annie Lennox. The Academy provides undergraduate and postgraduate training across instrumental performance, composition, jazz, musical theatre and opera, and recruits the most talented musicians from around the world, with a student community representing more than 50 nationalities
[...More...]

"Royal Academy Of Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Royal Northern College Of Music
The Royal Northern College of Music
Royal Northern College of Music
is one of the leading conservatoires in the world, located in Manchester, England. It is one of four conservatoires associated with the Associated Board of the Royal Schools of Music. In addition to being a centre of music education, RNCM is one of the UK’s busiest and most diverse public performance venues.Contents1 History 2 Building 3 Academics3.1 Faculties4 Student life4.1 Students' Union 4.2 Student housing5 Notable alumni 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] The RNCM has a rich history, dating back to the late 19th century and the establishment of the Royal Manchester
Manchester
College of Music (RMCM). In 1858, Sir Charles Hallé
Charles Hallé
founded the Hallé orchestra in Manchester, and by the early 1890s had raised the idea of a music college in the city
[...More...]

"Royal Northern College Of Music" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse

picture info

Royal Welsh College Of Music & Drama
The Royal Welsh College of Music
Music
& Drama
Drama
(Welsh: Coleg Brenhinol Cerdd a Drama
Drama
Cymru) is a conservatoire located in Cardiff, Wales. It includes three theatres, the Richard Burton Theatre, the Bute Theatre, and the Caird Studio. It also includes one concert hall, the Dora Stoutzker Hall. Its alumni include Anthony Hopkins, Aneurin Barnard and Rob Brydon.Contents1 History and description 2 Undergraduate degrees 3 Postgraduate
Postgraduate
degrees 4 Alumni 5 References 6 External linksHistory and description[edit] The College was established in 1949 as Cardiff
Cardiff
College of Music
Music
at Cardiff
Cardiff
Castle, but has since moved to purpose-built accommodation within the castle grounds of Bute Park
Bute Park
near Cardiff
Cardiff
University
[...More...]

"Royal Welsh College Of Music & Drama" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
Parouse
.