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Alturas, California
Alturas (formerly, Dorris Bridge, Dorris' Bridge, and Dorrisville)[8] is a city in and the county seat of Modoc County, California, United States
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Alturas (other)
Alturas is a town in Modoc County, California. Alturas may also refer to:Alturas, Florida, an unincorporated community in Polk County, Florida Alturas County, Idaho, historical county from 1864 to 1895 Alturas Lake in Idaho Alturas Indian Rancheria, a federally recognized tribe of Achomawi Indians in California Alturas (potato)See also[edit]Altura (other)Disambiguation page providing links to articles with similar titles This disambiguation page lists articles associated with the title Alturas. If an internal link led you here, you may wish to change the link to point directly to the inten
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1880 United States Census
The United States Census
United States Census
of 1880 conducted by the Census Bureau during June 1880 was the tenth United States
United States

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Achomawi
Achomawi
Achomawi
(also Achumawi, Ajumawi and Ahjumawi), are the northerly nine (out of eleven) tribes of the Pit River tribe
Pit River tribe
of Native Americans who live in what is now northeastern California
California
in the United States. These nine autonomous bands (also called "tribelets") of the Pit River Indians historically spoke various dialects of one common language, and the other two bands spoke dialects of a related language, called Atsugewi
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Fire Balloon
A fire balloon (風船爆弾, fūsen bakudan, lit. "balloon bomb"), or Fu-Go (ふ号[兵器], fugō [heiki], lit. "Code Fu [Weapon]"), was a weapon launched by Japan during World War II. A hydrogen balloon with a load varying from a 15 kg (33 lb) antipersonnel bomb to one 12-kilogram (26 lb) incendiary bomb and four 5 kg (11 lb) incendiary devices attached, it was designed as a cheap weapon intended to make use of the jet stream over the Pacific Ocean and drop bombs on American and Canadian cities, forests, and farmland.[1][2] The Japanese fire balloon was the first ever weapon possessing intercontinental range[3] (the second being the Convair B-36 Peacemaker and the third being the R-7 ICBM)
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Wetlands
A wetland is a land area that is saturated with water, either permanently or seasonally, such that it takes on the characteristics of a distinct ecosystem.[2] The primary factor that distinguishes wetlands from other land forms or water bodies is the characteristic vegetation of aquatic plants,[3][4] adapted to the unique hydric soil. Wetlands play a number of roles in the environment, principally water purification, flood control, carbon sink and shoreline stability. Wetlands are also considered the most biologically diverse of all ecosystems, serving as home to a wide range of plant and animal life. Wetlands occur naturally on every continent except Antarctica,[5] the largest includes the Amazon River
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Wild Rice
Wild rice
Wild rice
(Ojibwe: Manoomin; also called Canada
Canada
rice, Indian rice or 'nIvAra' in Sanskrit, and water oats) are four species of grasses forming the genus Zizania, and the grain that can be harvested from them. The grain was historically gathered and eaten in North America, India
India
and China. While now a delicacy in North America, the grain is eaten less in China,[1]:165 where the plant's stem is used as a vegetable. Wild rice
Wild rice
is not directly related to Asian rice (Oryza sativa), whose wild progenitors are O. rufipogon and O. nivara, although they are close cousins, sharing the tribe Oryzeae.[2] Wild-rice grains have a chewy outer sheath with a tender inner grain that has a slightly vegetal taste.[3] The plants grow in shallow water in small lakes and slow-flowing streams; often, only the flowering head of wild rice rises above the water
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Modoc Plateau
The Modoc Plateau
Modoc Plateau
lies in the northeast corner of California
California
as well as parts of Oregon
Oregon
and Nevada. Nearly 1,000,000 acres (400,000 ha) of the Modoc National Forest
Modoc National Forest
are on the plateau between the Medicine Lake
Lake
Highlands in the west and the Warner Mountains in the east. Its landform is volcanic table land ranging from 4,000 to 6,000 feet above sea level, cut by many north-south faults
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United States Census Bureau
The United States
United States
Census
Census
Bureau (USCB; officially the Bureau of the Census, as defined in Title 13 U.S.C. § 11) is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American people and economy. The Census Bureau is part of the U.S. Department of Commerce
Department of Commerce
and its director is appointed by the President of the United States. The Census
Census
Bureau's primary mission is conducting the U.S. Census every ten years, which allocates the seats of the U.S
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Continental Mediterranean Climate
A Mediterranean climate
Mediterranean climate
/ˌmɛdɪtəˈreɪniən/ or dry summer climate, is the climate typical of areas in the Mediterranean Basin. The Mediterranean climate
Mediterranean climate
is usually characterized by rainy winters and dry, warm to hot summers. While the climate receives its name from the Mediterranean Sea, an area where this climate is commonplace, it is also present in other areas of the planet, although with variations in the distribution of temperatures
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Köppen Climate Classification
Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
is one of the most widely used climate classification systems. It was first published by Russian German climatologist Wladimir Köppen
Wladimir Köppen
in 1884,[2][3] with several later modifications by Köppen, notably in 1918 and 1936.[4][5] Later, German climatologist Rudolf Geiger (1954, 1961) collaborated with Köppen on changes to the classification system, which is thus sometimes called the Köppen–Geiger climate classification system.[6][7] The Köppen climate classification
Köppen climate classification
system has been further modified, within the Trewartha climate classification
Trewartha climate classification
system in the middle 1960s (revised in 1980)
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Precipitation
In meteorology, precipitation is any product of the condensation of atmospheric water vapor that falls under gravity.[2] The main forms of precipitation include drizzle, rain, sleet, snow, graupel and hail. Precipitation
Precipitation
occurs when a portion of the atmosphere becomes saturated with water vapor, so that the water condenses and "precipitates". Thus, fog and mist are not precipitation but suspensions, because the water vapor does not condense sufficiently to precipitate. Two processes, possibly acting together, can lead to air becoming saturated: cooling the air or adding water vapor to the air. Precipitation
Precipitation
forms as smaller droplets coalesce via collision with other rain drops or ice crystals within a cloud
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1910 United States Census
The Thirteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau on April 15, 1910, determined the resident population of the United States to be 92,228,496, an increase of 21.0 percent over the 76,212,168 persons enumerated during the 1900 Census
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California Highway Patrol
The California
California
Highway Patrol (CHP) is a law enforcement agency of the state of California. The primary mission of the CHP is to ensure safety and enforce traffic laws on all California
California
highways and county roads in unincorporated areas. The CHP promotes traffic safety by inspecting commercial vehicles, as well as inspecting and certifying school buses, ambulances, and other specialized vehicles. The California State Legislature
California State Legislature
established the California
California
Highway Patrol as a branch of the Division of Motor Vehicles in the Department of Public Works, with legislation signed by Governor C. C. Young on August 14, 1929. It was established as a separate department by Governor Earl Warren
Earl Warren
in 1947
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1920 United States Census
The Fourteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau one month from January 5, 1920, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 106,021,537, an increase of 15.0 percent over the 92,228,496 persons enumerated during the 1910 Census. Despite the constitutional requirement that House seats be reapportioned to the states respective of their population every ten years according to the census, members of Congress failed to agree on a reapportionment plan following this census, and the distribution of seats from the 1910 census remained in effect until 1933
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1930 United States Census
The Fifteenth United States
United States
Census, conducted by the Census Bureau one month from April 1, 1930, determined the resident population of the United States
United States
to be 122,775,046, an increase of 13.7 percent over the 106,021,537 persons enumerated during the 1920 Census.Contents1 Census questions 2 Data availability 3 State rankings 4 City rankings 5 Notes 6 External linksCensus questions[edit] DCC bbb The 1930 Census collected the following information:[1]address name relationship to head of family home owned or rentedif owned, value of home if rented, monthly rentwhether owned a radio set whether on a farm sex race age marital status and, if married, age at first marriage school attendance literacy birthplace of person, and their parents if foreign born:language spoken at home before coming to the U
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