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Allen Sothoron
As player St. Louis Browns
St. Louis Browns
(1914–1915, 1917–1921) Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
(1921) Cleveland Indians
Cleveland Indians
(1921–1922) St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
(1924–1926)As manager St. Louis Browns
St. Louis Browns
(1933)Allen[1] Sutton Sothoron (April 27, 1893 – June 17, 1939) was an American professional baseball player, coach and manager. As a player, he was a spitball pitcher who spent 11 years in the Major Leagues playing for the St. Louis Browns, Boston Red Sox, Cleveland Indians and the St. Louis Cardinals. Born in Bradford, Ohio, Sothoron threw and batted right-handed, stood 5 feet 11 inches (1.80 m) tall and weighed 182 pounds (83 kg). He attended Albright College and Juniata College. Career[edit] Sothoron broke into the Major Leagues when the spitball was still legal
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Pitcher
In baseball, the pitcher is the player who throws the baseball from the pitcher's mound toward the catcher to begin each play, with the goal of retiring a batter, who attempts to either make contact with the pitched ball or draw a walk. In the numbering system used to record defensive plays, the pitcher is assigned the number 1. The pitcher is often considered the most important player on the defensive side of the game, and as such is situated at the right end of the defensive spectrum. There are many different types of pitchers, such as the starting pitcher, relief pitcher, middle reliever, lefty specialist, setup man, and closer. Traditionally, the pitcher also bats. Starting in 1973 with the American League
American League
and spreading to further leagues throughout the 1980s and 1990s, the hitting duties of the pitcher have generally been given over to the position of designated hitter, a cause of some controversy
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Innings Pitched
In baseball, innings pitched (IP) are the number of innings a pitcher has completed, measured by the number of batters and baserunners that are put out while the pitcher is on the pitching mound in a game. Three outs made is equal to one inning pitched. One out counts as one-third of an inning, and two outs counts as two-thirds of an inning. Sometimes, the statistic is written 34.1, 72.2, or 91.0, for example, to represent ​34 1⁄3 innings, ​72 2⁄3 innings, and 91 innings exactly, respectively. Runners left on base by a pitcher are not counted in determining innings pitched
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Manager (baseball)
In baseball, the field manager (commonly referred to as the manager) is the equivalent of a head coach who is responsible for overseeing and making final decisions on all aspects of on-field team strategy, lineup selection, training and instruction. Managers are typically assisted by a staff of assistant coaches whose responsibilities are specialized. Field managers are typically not involved in off-field personnel decisions or long-term club planning, responsibilities that are instead held by a team's general manager. Duties[edit] The manager chooses the batting order and starting pitcher before each game, and makes substitutions throughout the game – among the most significant being those decisions regarding when to bring in a relief pitcher. How much control a manager takes in a game's strategy varies from manager to manager and from game to game
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American League
The American League
American League
of Professional Baseball
Baseball
Clubs, or simply the American League
American League
(AL), is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) in the United States and Canada. It developed from the Western League, a minor league based in the Great Lakes states, which eventually aspired to major league status
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National League
The National League
National League
of Professional Baseball
Baseball
Clubs, known simply as the National League
National League
(NL), is the older of two leagues constituting Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) in the United States and Canada, and the world's oldest current professional team sports league. Founded on February 2, 1876, to replace the National Association of Professional Base Ball Players, it is sometimes called the Senior Circuit, in contrast to MLB's other league, the American League, which was founded 25 years later. Both leagues currently have 15 teams. The two league champions of 1903 arranged to compete against each other in the inaugural World Series. After the 1904 champions failed to reach a similar agreement, the two leagues formalized the World Series
World Series
as an arrangement between the leagues
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Shutouts In Baseball
In Major League Baseball, a shutout (denoted statistically as ShO or SHO[1]), also known as a complete-game shutout,[2] refers to the act by which a single pitcher pitches a complete game and does not allow the opposing team to score a run. If two or more pitchers combine to complete this act, no pitcher is awarded a shutout, although the team itself can be said to have "shutout" the opposing team. The ultimate single achievement among pitchers is a perfect game, which has been accomplished 23 times in over 135 years, most recently by Félix Hernández
Félix Hernández
of the Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
on August 15, 2012. By definition, a perfect game is counted as a shutout. A no-hitter completed by one pitcher is also a shutout unless the opposing team manages to score through a series of errors, base on balls, catcher's interferences, dropped third strikes, or hit batsmen
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1924 In Baseball
The following are the baseball events of the year 1924
1924
throughout the world.List of years in baseball... 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 ...1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927..
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Games Pitched
In baseball statistics, games pitched (denoted by GP, or GamesG in tables of only pitching statistics) is the number of games in which a player appears as a pitcher; a player who is announced as the pitcher must face at least one batter, although exceptions are made if the pitcher announced in the starting lineup is injured before facing a batter, perhaps while batting or running the bases in the top of the first inning, before the opposing team comes to bat. The statistic is also referred to as appearances, usually to refer to the number of games a relief pitcher has pitched in. Contents1 Career leaders1.1 1,000-games-pitched club2 See also 3 ReferencesCareer leaders[edit] 1,000-games-pitched club[edit] Listed are all Major League Baseball
Baseball
players with at least 1000 games pitched
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Hit (baseball)
In baseball statistics, a hit (denoted by H), also called a base hit, is credited to a batter when the batter safely reaches first base after hitting the ball into fair territory, without the benefit of an error or a fielder's choice.Contents1 Scoring a hit1.1 Types of hits2 Pitching a no-hitter 3 History 4 Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
rules 5 See also 6 ReferencesScoring a hit[edit] To achieve a hit, the batter must reach first base before any fielder can either tag him with the ball, throw to another player protecting the base before the batter reaches it, or tag first base while carrying the ball
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Bases On Balls
A base on balls (BB), also known as a walk, occurs in baseball when a batter receives four pitches that the umpire calls balls, and is in turn awarded first base without the possibility of being called out. The base on balls is defined in Section 2.00 of baseball's Official Rules,[1] and further detail is given in 6.08(a).[2] It is, however, considered a faux pas for a professional player to actually walk to first base; the batter-runner and any advancing runners normally jog on such a play.[3][4] The term "base on balls" distinguishes a walk from the other manners in which a batter can be awarded first base without liability to be put out (e.g., hit by pitch (HBP), catcher's interference).[5] Though a base on balls, catcher's interference, or a batter hit by a pitched ball all result in the batter (and possibly runners on base) being awarded a base,[6] the term "walk" usually refers only to a base on balls, and not the other methods of reaching base without the bat touching the ball
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Complete Game
In baseball, a complete game (denoted by CG) is the act of a pitcher pitching an entire game without the benefit of a relief pitcher.[1] A pitcher who meets this criterion will be credited with a complete game regardless of the number of innings played - pitchers who throw an entire official game that is shortened by rain will still be credited with a complete game, while starting pitchers who are relieved in extra innings after throwing nine or more innings will not be credited with a complete game. A starting pitcher who is replaced by a pinch hitter in the final half inning of a game will still be credited with a complete game. The frequency of complete games has evolved since the early days of baseball. The complete game was essentially an expectation in the early 20th century and pitchers completed almost all of the games they started
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Albright College
Albright College is a private, co-educational, liberal arts college. It was founded in 1856 and is located in Reading, Pennsylvania, United States. Albright College has been named one of the "Best Northeastern" schools for 14 consecutive years by The Princeton Review.[3][4][5] Albright College has also been named one of the most ethnically and economically diverse schools in the country by U.S News and World Report. In the “Campus Ethnic Diversity” category, as part of its 2018 Best Colleges rankings, U.S
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Bugs Baer
Arthur "Bugs" Baer (January 9, 1886 – May 17, 1969) was an American journalist and humorist. Baer was prominent in the New York City journalism and entertainment scene for many years and worked as a sports journalist and cartoonist. Called by The New York Times "one of the country's best known humorists", he wrote the humor column "One Word Led to Another" for the King Features Syndicate (the Hearst papers).[1] Known as a source of quips that were often repeated by others (and the reported inventor of the nickname "Sultan of Swat" for Babe Ruth), Milton Berle is known as one of the people to have "tapped his wit... admitting that when he needed fresh humor, he would invite Mr. Baer to spend an hour or two with him at Toots Shor's."[1] Biography[edit] Baer was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the seventh of 14 children born to immigrants from Alsace-Lorraine
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Minor League Baseball
Minor League Baseball
Baseball
is a hierarchy of professional baseball leagues in the Americas that compete at levels below Major League Baseball (MLB) and provide opportunities for player development and a way to prepare for the major leagues. All of the minor leagues are operated as independent businesses. Most are members of the umbrella organization known as Minor League Baseball
Baseball
(MiLB), which operates under the Commissioner of Baseball
Baseball
within the scope of organized baseball. Several leagues, known as independent baseball leagues, do not have any official links to Major League Baseball. Except for the Mexican League, teams in the organized minor leagues are generally independently owned and operated but are directly affiliated with one major league team through a standardized Player Development Contract (PDC)
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Boston Braves (baseball)
The Atlanta
Atlanta
Braves, a current Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
franchise, originated in Boston, Massachusetts. This article details the history of the Boston
Boston
Braves, from 1871 to 1952, after which they moved to Milwaukee
Milwaukee
to become the Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Braves, and then eventually to Atlanta, to become the Atlanta
Atlanta
Braves. The Boston
Boston
Franchise played at South End Grounds
South End Grounds
from 1871 to 1914 and at Braves Field
Braves Field
from 1915 to 1952
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