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Ali Larayedh
Ali Laarayedh
Ali Laarayedh
(Tunisian Arabic: علي العريّض‎, ʿAlī el-ʿArayiḍ; born 15 August 1955) is a Tunisian politician who was Prime Minister of Tunisia
Prime Minister of Tunisia
from 2013 to 2014. Previously he served in the government as the Minister of the Interior from 2011[1][2][3] to 2013. Following the resignation of Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali, Laarayedh was designated as Prime Minister in February 2013. He is a member of the Ennahda Movement. Laarayedh resigned on 9 January 2014.[4]Contents1 Early life 2 Political activism 3 Career 4 Personal life 5 ReferencesEarly life[edit] Laarayedh was born in Medenine
Medenine
in 1955.[2][5] Political activism[edit] Laarayedh was the spokesperson for the Ennahda Movement
Ennahda Movement
from 1981 until his arrest in 1990
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Head Of Government Of Tunisia
This page lists the holders of the office of Head of Government of Tunisia
Tunisia
(French: chef du gouvernement tunisien). The post was called Prime Minister until the Revolution, though that title is still used by many sources outside Tunisia. The office was created in May 1922. Mustapha Dinguizli
Mustapha Dinguizli
was thus Tunisia's first Prime Minister in the modern sense. Prior to that, Tunisia
Tunisia
had traditional Muslim-style viziers.Contents1 Appointment 2 Constitutional powers 3 List 4 Timeline 5 Footnotes 6 See also 7 External linksAppointment[edit] After the election, the President nominate the candidate of the party which gained the most votes to form a government within a month. The nominee must submit its program to the Assembly of the Representatives of the People and get the trust of the majority of its members before being formally appointed the Head of Government by the President
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Tahar Ben Ammar
Tahar Ben Ammar
Tahar Ben Ammar
(November 25, 1889[1][2] – May 10, 1985[3]) (Tunisian Arabic: طاهر بن عمار ) was a Tunisian politician. He was born in Tunis. He served as the last Prime Minister of Tunisia under French rule from 1954 to 1956, and was the first Prime Minister of the Kingdom of Tunisia, from March 20 to April 11, 1956. Ben Ammar co-founded with Abdelaziz Thâalbi the Destour on March 1920. On June 3, 1955, he signed the first agreement for the internal autonomy of Tunisia
Tunisia
and on March 20, 1956. Taher Ben Ammar was the co- signatory of the official Memorandum of Understanding for Tunisia's independence with the French Foreign Minister Christian Pineau. His government resigned after the Constituent Assembly meeting on April 9, 1956
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Mustapha Ben Ismaïl
Mustapha Ben Ismaïl (أبو النخبة مصطفى بن اسماعيل), born around 1850 at Bizerte and died in 1887 at Istanbul,[1] was a Tunisian politician. His origins are obscure and few details are known of his youth. Some hostile sources make him the son of a Jewish convert and an unknown Tunisian man, with his mother remarrying to a Muslim and settling in Tunis. Subsequently he is meant to have begged on the streets of the capital, worked in a Maltese tavern and then for a barber, before being hired by an offer of the guard of the Bey of Tunis, who brought him into the palace. There he is said to have been noticed by Muhammad III as-Sadiq at the beginning of his reign. The Bey appointed him Intendant of his Civil List, a general of his guard, and Qaid of Cap Bon. His influence is discernable from the end of 1872 and grew without pause
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M'hamed Djellouli
M'hammed Djellouli (February 1826 Tunis - June 1908) was a Tunisian politician and Prime Minister. He was born into a patrician family of the Tunis aristocracy affiliated with the Beylical Makhzen. He began his career in 1872 as an official in the Methelith tribe. In 1874, he was appointed vice president of the Capital's City Council, while also leading Djerba and Methelith starting in 1875, when he became a brigadier general. In 1876, he became responsible for reviewing any cases between subjects of the Bey of Tunis and European nationals.[1] In 1880, he became governor of Kef Wanifa and Agha Odjak and caïd of Sfax and South Agha Odjak after the expulsion of his predecessor and uncle, Hassouna Djellouli
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Taïeb Djellouli
Mohamed Taïeb Djellouli (1857-1944) was a Tunisian politician. A member of an aristocratic Tunisian family, he served as the last Grand Vizier of the Beylik of Tunis from 1915 until 1922. His son Aziz Djellouli became a well-known businessman. References[edit]Mohamed El Aziz Ben Achour, Catégories de la société tunisoise dans la deuxième moitié du XIXe siècle, éd. Institut national d'archéologie et d'art, Tunis, 1989, pp. 195–197 Mohamed Salah Lejri, Évolution du mouvement national tunisien, vol. I, éd. Maison tunisienne de l'édition, Tunis, 1974, p. 203v t eHeads of Government of TunisiaBeylik of Tunis (Grand Vizier)al-Tabi Khoja al-Taba'a Mustapha Khaznadar Pacha Mohammed Khaznadar Ben Ismaïl Mohammed Khaznadar Bouattour M. Djellouli Djait T. DjellouliBeylik of Tunis (Prime Minister)Dinguizli Bouhageb Lakhoua Chenik S. Baccouche Kaak Chenik S. Baccouche M. S
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Mustapha Dinguizli
Mustapha Dinguizli (1865-1926) was a Tunisian politician. He was born in Tunis; he served as the first Prime Minister of Tunisia from 1922 until his death.[1] Biography[edit] Dinguizli was born in Tunis to a family of Turkish origin.[2] He studied at the Collège Sadiki and then at the Ecole Normale de Versailles and the École Normale Supérieure de Fontenay-Saint-Cloud.[2] His maternal uncle, Sadok Ghileb, was the mayor of Tunis which allowed Dinguizli to climb the ranks to the post of governor of the caid suburbs of Tunis between 1900 and 1912. After Ghileb's death, Dinguizli succeeded his uncle as head of the municipality of Tunis between 1912 and 1915. He was appointed Grand Vizier of Tunis in 1922, with the agreement of the Resident General of France. Pursuing a conciliatory policy with the authorities of the French protectorate of Tunisia, Dinguizli remained at his post until his death in 1926
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Khelil Bouhageb
Khelil Bouhageb
Khelil Bouhageb
(August 27, 1863 in Tunis
Tunis
– February 8, 1942 in La Marsa) was a Tunisian politician and reformer. He served as Prime Minister of Tunisia
Tunisia
from 1926 to 1932, after the death of Mustapha Dinguizli. Bouhageb was the son of Sheikh Salem Bouhageb; his brother was the doctor Hassine Bouhageb. References[edit]Sadok Zmerli et Hamadi Sahili, Figures tunisiennes, éd. Dar al-Gharb al-Islami, Beyrouth, 1993, p. 310v t eHeads of Government of TunisiaBeylik of Tunis (Grand Vizier)al-Tabi Khoja al-Taba'a Mustapha Khaznadar Pacha Mohammed Khaznadar Ben Ismaïl Mohammed Khaznadar Bouattour M. Djellouli Djait T. DjellouliBeylik of Tunis (Prime Minister)Dinguizli Bouhageb Lakhoua Chenik S. Baccouche Kaak Chenik S. Baccouche M. S. Mzali Dupoizat Ben AmmarKingdom of Tunisia (Prime Minister)Ben Ammar BourguibaRepublic of Tunisia (Prime Minister)Ladgham Nouira M
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Hédi Lakhoua
Mohamed Hédi Lakhoua
Hédi Lakhoua
(1872-1949) was a Tunisian politician. A native of Tunis, he died in that city. He served as Prime Minister of Tunisia from 1932 until 1942. References[edit]http://www.elpais.com/articulo/andalucia/elite/morisca/boneteros/elpepiespand/20050129elpand_35/Tes?print=1v t eHeads of Government of TunisiaBeylik of Tunis (Grand Vizier)al-Tabi Khoja al-Taba'a Mustapha Khaznadar Pacha Mohammed Khaznadar Ben Ismaïl Mohammed Khaznadar Bouattour M. Djellouli Djait T. DjellouliBeylik of Tunis (Prime Minister)Dinguizli Bouhageb Lakhoua Chenik S. Baccouche Kaak Chenik S. Baccouche M. S. Mzali Dupoizat Ben AmmarKingdom of Tunisia (Prime Minister)Ben Ammar BourguibaRepublic of Tunisia (Prime Minister)Ladgham Nouira M. Mzali Sfar Ben Ali H. Baccouche Karoui Ghannouchi EssebsiRepublic of Tunisia (Head of Government)Jebali Laarayedh Jomaa Essid ChahedThis article about a Tunisian politician is a stub
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Mohamed Chenik
Mohamed Chenik also known as M'hamed Chenik (محمد شنيق) (born Tunis, May 1889 - died Radès, November 20, 1976) was a Tunisian politician and businessman. He served as Prime Minister of Tunisia twice, in 1943 under Muhammad VII al-Munsif, and again from 1950 until 1952 under Muhammad VIII al-Amin.v t eHeads of Government of TunisiaBeylik of Tunis (Grand Vizier)al-Tabi Khoja al-Taba'a Mustapha Khaznadar Pacha Mohammed Khaznadar Ben Ismaïl Mohammed Khaznadar Bouattour M. Djellouli Djait T. DjellouliBeylik of Tunis (Prime Minister)Dinguizli Bouhageb Lakhoua Chenik S. Baccouche Kaak Chenik S. Baccouche M. S. Mzali Dupoizat Ben AmmarKingdom of Tunisia (Prime Minister)Ben Ammar BourguibaRepublic of Tunisia (Prime Minister)Ladgham Nouira M. Mzali Sfar Ben Ali H. Baccouche Karoui Ghannouchi EssebsiRepublic of Tunisia (Head of Government)Jebali Laarayedh Jomaa Essid ChahedThis article about a Tunisian politician is a stub
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Slaheddine Baccouche
Slaheddine Baccouche (August 14, 1883 – December 24, 1959) was a Tunisian politician. He served as grand vizier of Tunis under Muhammad VIII al-Amin, from 1943 to 1947 and again from 1952 to 1954. His nephew was the writer Hachemi Baccouche. References[edit]Jean Déjeux, Dictionnaire des auteurs maghrébins de langue française, éd. Karthala, Paris, 1984, p. 272v t eHeads of Government of TunisiaBeylik of Tunis (Grand Vizier)al-Tabi Khoja al-Taba'a Mustapha Khaznadar Pacha Mohammed Khaznadar Ben Ismaïl Mohammed Khaznadar Bouattour M. Djellouli Djait T. DjellouliBeylik of Tunis (Prime Minister)Dinguizli Bouhageb Lakhoua Chenik S. Baccouche Kaak Chenik S. Baccouche M. S. Mzali Dupoizat Ben AmmarKingdom of Tunisia (Prime Minister)Ben Ammar BourguibaRepublic of Tunisia (Prime Minister)Ladgham Nouira M. Mzali Sfar Ben Ali H
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Mohamed Salah Mzali
Mohamed Salah Mzali
Mohamed Salah Mzali
(February 11, 1896 in Monastir – November 22, 1984) was a Tunisian educator, historian, and politician. He was Prime Minister of Tunisia
Tunisia
for a brief period in 1954 under Muhammad VIII al-Amin. Mohamed Salah Mzali
Mohamed Salah Mzali
is a descent of the Ait Mzal clan of the Masmuda tribe of the Sous
Sous
who had established the Hafsid dynasty, he is also a relative of Mohammed Mzali.[1] References[edit]^ Mohamed Mzali, Un Premier ministre de Bourguiba témoigne, éd. Jean Picollec, Paris, 2004, p. 86Charles-André Julien, Et la Tunisie devint indépendante: 1951-1957, éd. Jeune Afrique, Paris, 1985, p. 124v t eHeads of Government of TunisiaBeylik of Tunis (Grand Vizier)al-Tabi Khoja al-Taba'a Mustapha Khaznadar Pacha Mohammed Khaznadar Ben Ismaïl Mohammed Khaznadar Bouattour M. Djellouli Djait T
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Kingdom Of Tunisia
Kingdom
Kingdom
may refer to:Contents1 Monarchy 2 Taxonomy 3 Arts and media3.1 Television 3.2 Music 3.3 Other media4 People 5 Other 6 See alsoMonarchy[edit] Further information: List of kingdoms A type of monarchy:A realm ruled bya king a queen regnantTaxonomy[edit] Kingdom
Kingdom
(taxonomy), a category in biological taxonomyArts and media[edit] Television[edit] Kingdom
Kingdom
(UK TV series), a 2007 British television drama starring Stephen Fry Kingdom
Kingdom
(U.S
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Hayreddin Pasha
Hayreddin Pasha
Pasha
(Tunisian Arabic: خير الدين باشا التونسي‎ Khayr ed-Din Pasha
Pasha
et-Tunsi; Ottoman Turkish: تونسلى حيرالدين پاشا‎; Turkish: Tunuslu Hayreddin Paşa; c. 1820 – 30 January 1890) was an Ottoman-Tunisian politician who was born to a Circassian family. First serving as Beylerbeyi of Ottoman Tunisia, he later achieved the high post of Grand Vizier of the Ottoman Empire
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Bahi Ladgham
Bahi Ladgham
Bahi Ladgham
(10 January 1913 – 13 April 1998) (Tunisian Arabic: الباهي الادغم ) was a Tunisian politician.Secretary of Presidency (1957–1969) (de facto prime minister). Prime minister of Tunisia
Tunisia
(7 November 1969 – 2 November 1970)References[edit]^ The International Who's Who, 1997-98. Europa Publications. 1997. ISBN 9781857430226. Retrieved 2015-04-08. v t eHeads of Government of TunisiaBeylik of Tunis (Grand Vizier)al-Tabi Khoja al-Taba'a Mustapha Khaznadar Pacha Mohammed Khaznadar Ben Ismaïl Mohammed Khaznadar Bouattour M. Djellouli Djait T. DjellouliBeylik of Tunis (Prime Minister)Dinguizli Bouhageb Lakhoua Chenik S. Baccouche Kaak Chenik S. Baccouche M. S. Mzali Dupoizat Ben AmmarKingdom of Tunisia (Prime Minister)Ben Ammar BourguibaRepublic of Tunisia (Prime Minister)Ladgham Nouira M. Mzali Sfar Ben Ali H
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Hedi Amara Nouira
Hédi Amara Nouira (5 April 1911 – 25 January 1993) was a Tunisian politician. He served as the 11th Prime Minister of Tunisia
Prime Minister of Tunisia
between 1970 and 1980. Following the failure of a short-lived Socialist experiment in the 1960s, prime minister Hedi Nouira liberalised the economy during the 1970s. In 1970, the then Governor of the Central Bank, Hedi Nouira was appointed Prime Minister. The most decisive factor in Nouira's appointment seemed to be his commitment to private initiative as well as his financier’s background. He retired from politics in 1980 after suffering a stroke. Hedi Nouira died on January 25, 1993 after suffering from an illness that local media did not want to disclose.[1] References[edit]^ "Hedi Nouira Is Dead; The Former Premier Of Tunisia
Tunisia
Was 81". The New York Times. 1993-01-27. ISSN 0362-4331
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