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Alfred A. Knopf
Alfred A. Knopf, Inc. is a New York publishing house that was founded by Alfred A. Knopf
Alfred A. Knopf
Sr. in 1915. The publisher had a reputation for a pursuit of perfection and elegant taste.[1] It was acquired by Random House in 1960 and is now part of the Knopf Doubleday Publishing Group.[2] The Knopf publishing house is associated with its borzoi colophon (shown at right), which was designed by co-founder Blanche Knopf in 1925.[3]Contents1 History 2 Awards 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Alfred A. Knopf
Alfred A. Knopf
Sr., 1935Knopf was founded in 1915 by Alfred A. Knopf, Sr.
Alfred A. Knopf, Sr.
with a $5,000 advance from his father.[3] The first office was located in New York's Candler Building. The publishing house was officially incorporated in 1918, with Alfred Knopf as president, Blanche Knopf as vice-president, and Samuel Knopf as treasurer
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Dorothy Richardson
Dorothy Miller Richardson (17 May 1873 – 17 June 1957) was a British author and journalist. Author of Pilgrimage, a sequence of 13 semi-autobiographical novels–though Richardson saw them as chapters of one work–she was one of the earliest modernist novelists to use stream of consciousness as a narrative technique. Richardson also emphasizes in Pilgrimage the importance and distinct nature of female experiences. The title Pilgrimage alludes not only to "the journey of the artist ..
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Jack London
John Griffith "Jack" London (born John Griffith Chaney;[1] January 12, 1876 – November 22, 1916)[2][3][4][5] was an American novelist, journalist, and social activist. A pioneer in the world of commercial magazine fiction, he was one of the first writers to become a worldwide celebrity and earn a large fortune from writing. He was also an innovator in the genre that would later become known as science fiction.[6] His most famous works include The Call of the Wild
The Call of the Wild
and White Fang, both set in the Klondike Gold Rush, as well as the short stories "To Build a Fire", "An Odyssey of the North", and "Love of Life"
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Bill Clinton
Governor of Arkansas1978 election 1980 campaign 1982 reelection 1984 reelection 1986 reelection 1990 reelection42nd President of the United StatesPresidencyTimelinePoliciesEconomic Gun Control Environmental ForeignClinton DoctrineInternational tripsAppointmentsCabinet Judicial AppointmentsFirst termCampaign for the presidencyPrimaries 1992 election1st inaugurationNAFTA Health Security Act 1994 midterm elections Economic policy Travelgate Whitewater AmeriCorps Dayton AgreementSecond termReelection campaignPrimaries 1996 reelection2nd inaugurationOperation Infinite Reach Bombing of Yugoslavia Balanced BudgetClinton–Lewinsky scandal ImpeachmentOne America Initiative Pardon controversyPost-presidencyPresidential Library My Life Activities Clinton Foundation Clinton Bush
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Anne McCormick
Anne O'Hare McCormick
Anne O'Hare McCormick
(1880 – 29 May 1954) was a foreign news correspondent for the New York Times, in an era where the field was almost exclusively "a man's world". In 1937, she won the Pulitzer Prize for correspondence, becoming the first woman to receive a major category Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
in journalism. Born in Wakefield, Yorkshire, UK, in 1880,[1] she was educated in the United States
United States
at the College of Saint Mary of the Springs in Columbus, Ohio. After graduating she became an associate editor for the Catholic Universe Bulletin. Her 1911 marriage to Dayton businessman Francis J
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Joan Didion
Joan Didion
Joan Didion
(born December 5, 1934) is an American journalist and writer of novels, screenplays, and autobiographical works. Didion is best known for her literary journalism and memoirs. In her novels and essays, Didion explores the disintegration of American morals and cultural chaos; the overriding theme of her work is individual and social fragmentation.[2] At the peak of Didion's career, her writing was recognized for its significance in defining and observing American subcultures for mainstream audiences. In 1968, The New York Times
The New York Times
referred to her early work as containing "grace, sophistication, nuance, [and] irony."[3] In 2005, she won the National Book Award for Nonfiction and was a finalist for both the National Book Critics Circle Award and the Pulitzer Prize
Pulitzer Prize
for Biography/Autobiography for The Year of Magical Thinking
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James Ellroy
Lee Earle "James" Ellroy (born March 4, 1948) is an American crime fiction writer and essayist. Ellroy has become known for a telegrammatic prose style in his most recent work, wherein he frequently omits connecting words and uses only short, staccato sentences,[1] and in particular for the novels The Black Dahlia (1987), The Big Nowhere
The Big Nowhere
(1988), L.A. Confidential
L.A. Confidential
(1990), White Jazz (1992), American Tabloid
American Tabloid
(1995), The Cold Six Thousand
The Cold Six Thousand
(2001), and Blood's a Rover
Blood's a Rover
(2009).Contents1 Life and career1.1 Literary career2 Writing style2.1 The L.A. Quartet 2.2 Underworld USA Trilogy 2.3 My Dark Places 2.4 Future writings3 Public life and views 4 Film adaptations and screenplays 5 Bibliography5.1 Lloyd Hopkins Trilogy 5.2 L.A. Quartet 5.3 Underworld USA Trilogy 5.4 The Second L.A
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Martin Gardner
Martin Gardner
Martin Gardner
(October 21, 1914 – May 22, 2010) was an American popular mathematics and popular science writer, with interests also encompassing scientific skepticism, micromagic, philosophy, religion, and literature—especially the writings of Lewis Carroll, L. Frank Baum, and G. K. Chesterton.[4][5] He was considered a leading authority on Lewis Carroll
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Lee H. Hamilton
Lee Herbert Hamilton (born April 20, 1931) is a former member of the United States House of Representatives and currently a member of the U.S. Homeland Security Advisory Council. A member of the Democratic Party, Hamilton represented the 9th congressional district of Indiana from 1965 to 1999. Following his departure from Congress he has served on a number of governmental advisory boards, most notably as the vice chairman of the 9/11 Commission.Contents1 Early life and education 2 Congress 3 Life after Congress3.1 2008 Election 3.2 World Justice Project4 Honors and awards 5 Presidential Medal of Freedom 6 Bibliography 7 References 8 External linksEarly life and education[edit] Born in Daytona Beach, Florida, Lee Hamilton graduated from DePauw University in 1952 and from the Indiana University School of Law - Bloomington in 1956
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Kazuo Ishiguro
Kazuo Ishiguro
Kazuo Ishiguro
OBE FRSA FRSL (born 8 November 1954) is a Nobel Prize-winning English novelist, screenwriter, and short story writer. He was born in Nagasaki, Japan; his family moved to England in 1960 when he was five. Ishiguro graduated from the University of Kent
University of Kent
with a bachelor's degree in English and Philosophy in 1978 and gained his master's from the University of East Anglia's creative writing course in 1980. Ishiguro is considered one of the most celebrated contemporary fiction authors in the English-speaking world, having received four Man Booker Prize nominations and winning the 1989 award for his novel The Remains of the Day. His 2005 novel, Never Let Me Go, was named by Time as the best novel of 2005 and included in its list of the 100 best English-language novels from 1923 to 2005. His seventh novel, The Buried Giant, was published in 2015
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Nella Larsen
Nellallitea "Nella" Larsen, born Nellie Walker (April 13, 1891 – March 30, 1964), was an American novelist of the Harlem Renaissance. Working as a nurse and a librarian, she published two novels, Quicksand (1928) and Passing (1929), and a few short stories
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Atlantic Monthly
The Atlantic
The Atlantic
is an American magazine and multi-platform publisher, founded in 1857 as The Atlantic
The Atlantic
Monthly in Boston, Massachusetts. The magazine was created as a literary and cultural commentary magazine, and published leading writers' commentary on abolition, education, and other major issues in contemporary political affairs. The magazine's initiator, and one of the founders, was Francis H. Underwood,[3][4] The other founding sponsors were prominent writers including Ralph Waldo Emerson, Oliver Wendell Holmes, Sr., Henry Wadsworth Longfellow, Harriet Beecher Stowe, and John Greenleaf Whittier.[5][6] James Russell Lowell
James Russell Lowell
was its first editor.[7] After struggling with financial hardship and a series of ownership changes since the late 20th century, the magazine was reformatted in the early 21st century as a general editorial magazine
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John Banville
William John Banville
John Banville
(born 8 December 1945), who sometimes writes as Benjamin Black, is an Irish novelist, adapter of dramas, and screenwriter.[1] Recognised for his precise, cold, forensic prose style, Nabokovian inventiveness, and for the dark humour of his generally arch narrators, Banville is considered to be "one of the most imaginative literary novelists writing in the English language today."[2] He has been described as "the heir to Proust, via Nabokov."[3] Banville has received numerous awards in his career. His novel The Book of Evidence was shortlisted for the Booker Prize
Booker Prize
and won the Guinness Peat Aviation award in 1989. His fourteenth novel, The Sea, won the Booker Prize
Booker Prize
in 2005. In 2011, Banville was awarded the Franz Kafka Prize, while 2013 brought both the Irish PEN Award and the Austrian State Prize for European Literature
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Good Neighbor Policy
The Good Neighbor policy
Good Neighbor policy
was the foreign policy of the administration of United States
United States
President Franklin Roosevelt towards Latin America. Although the policy was implemented by the Roosevelt administration, President Woodrow Wilson
Woodrow Wilson
had previously used the term—but subsequently went on to invade Mexico. Senator Henry Clay
Henry Clay
had coined the term Good Neighbor in the previous century. The policy's main principle was that of non-intervention and non-interference in the domestic affairs of Latin America
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Chapbook
A chapbook is a type of popular literature printed in early modern Europe. Produced cheaply, chapbooks were commonly small, paper-covered booklets, usually printed on a single sheet folded into books of 8, 12, 16 and 24 pages. They were often illustrated with crude woodcuts, which sometimes bore no relation to the text. When illustrations were included in chapbooks, they were considered popular prints. The tradition of chapbooks arose in the 16th century, as soon as printed books became affordable, and rose to its height during the 17th and 18th centuries. Many different kinds of ephemera and popular or folk literature were published as chapbooks, such as almanacs, children's literature, folk tales, ballads, nursery rhymes, pamphlets, poetry, and political and religious tracts. The term "chapbook" for this type of literature was coined in the 19th century. The corresponding French and German terms are bibliothèque bleue (blue book) and Volksbuch, respectively
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Purchase, New York
Purchase is a hamlet in the town of Harrison, in Westchester County, New York. One myth explains that its name is derived from Harrison's purchase, where John Harrison was to be granted as much land as he could ride in one day.[1] Purchase is home to State University of New York at Purchase and Manhattanville College.Contents1 History 2 Economy and business 3 Education3.1 Public schools 3.2 Private schools 3.3 Colleges and universities4 Media and culture 5 Notable residents 6 See also 7 References 8 External linksHistory[edit] In 1967, 200 residents stated support for a plan to incorporate Purchase so corporations could not build in the community.[2] In response, officials from the Town of Harrison put forward plans to try to become a city in an attempt to stop Purchase from seceding from the Town of Harrison.[3] There are many historic sites located in Purchase
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