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Alexandre Falguière
Jean Alexandre Joseph Falguière (also given as Jean-Joseph-Alexandre Falguière, or in short Alexandre Falguière) (7 September 1831 – 20 April 1900) was a French sculptor and painter.[1]Contents1 Biography 2 See also 3 Notes 4 External linksBiography[edit]Falguière's Victor of the Cockfight, book engraving c. 1900, with added draperyFalguière was born in Toulouse.[1] A pupil of the École des Beaux-Arts, he won the Prix de Rome
Prix de Rome
in 1859; he was awarded the medal of honor at the
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Bibliothèque Nationale De France
The Bibliothèque nationale de France
France
(BnF, English: National Library of France; French: [bi.bli.jɔ.tɛk na.sjɔ.nal də fʁɑ̃s]) is the national library of France, located in Paris. It is the national repository of all that is published in France
France
and also holds extensive historical collections.Contents1 History 2 New buildings 3 Mission 4 Manuscript
Manuscript
collection 5 Digital library 6 List of directors6.1 1369–1792 6.2 1792–present7 Films about the library 8 Famous patrons 9 See also 10 References 11 Further reading 12 External linksHistory[edit] The National Library of France
France
traces its origin to the royal library founded at the Louvre Palace
Louvre Palace
by Charles V in 1368
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Académie Des Beaux-Arts
The Académie des Beaux-Arts
Académie des Beaux-Arts
(French pronunciation: ​[lakadeˈmi de boˈzaʁ], Academy of Fine Arts) is a French learned society. It is one of the five academies of the Institut de France
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École Des Beaux-Arts
An École des Beaux-Arts
École des Beaux-Arts
(French pronunciation: ​[ekɔl de bozaʁ], School of Fine Arts) is one of a number of influential art schools in France. The most famous is the École nationale supérieure des Beaux-Arts, now located on the left bank in Paris, across the Seine
Seine
from the Louvre, at 14 rue Bonaparte (in the 6th arrondissement). The school has a history spanning more than 350 years, training many of the great artists in Europe
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Auguste Rodin
François Auguste René Rodin (12 November 1840 – 17 November 1917), known as Auguste Rodin
Auguste Rodin
(/oʊˈɡuːst roʊˈdæ̃/; French: [oɡyst ʁɔdɛ̃]), was a French sculptor[1]. Although Rodin is generally considered the progenitor of modern sculpture,[2] he did not set out to rebel against the past. He was schooled traditionally, took a craftsman-like approach to his work, and desired academic recognition,[3] although he was never accepted into Paris's foremost school of art. Sculpturally, Rodin possessed a unique ability to model a complex, turbulent, deeply pocketed surface in clay. Many of his most notable sculptures were roundly criticized during his lifetime. They clashed with predominant figurative sculpture traditions, in which works were decorative, formulaic, or highly thematic
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Carolus-Duran
Charles Auguste Émile Durand, known as Carolus-Duran[1] ( Lille
Lille
4 July 1837 – 17 February 1917 Paris), was a French painter and art instructor. He is noted for his stylish depictions of members of high society in Third Republic France.Contents1 Biography 2 Pupils 3 Selected works 4 References 5 External linksBiography[edit] He was the son of a hotel owner. His first drawing lessons were with a local sculptor named Augustin-Phidias Cadet de Beaupré (1800-?) at the Académie de Lille; then took up painting with François Souchon, a student of Jacques Louis David. He went to Paris
Paris
in 1853, where he adopted the name "Carolus-Duran". In 1859, he had his first exhibition at the Salon. That same year, he began attending the Académie Suisse, where he studied until 1861
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Ernest Alexandre Honoré Coquelin
Ernest Alexandre Honoré Coquelin
Ernest Alexandre Honoré Coquelin
(16 May 1848 – 8 February 1909) was a French actor. Also called Coquelin Cadet, to distinguish him from his brother, he was born at Boulogne, and entered the Conservatoire in 1864.[1] He graduated with the first prize in comedy and made his debut in 1867 at the Odéon. The next year he appeared with his brother at the Théâtre Français
Théâtre Français
and became a sociétaire in 1879
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John The Baptist
John the Baptist
John the Baptist
(Hebrew: יוחנן המטביל‎, Ancient Greek: Ἰωάννης ὁ βαπτιστής, Iōánnēs ho baptistḗs or Ἰωάννης ὁ βαπτίζων, Iōánnēs ho baptízōn,[5][6][7][8][9], Coptic: ⲓⲱⲁⲛⲛⲏⲥ ⲡⲓⲡⲣⲟⲇⲣⲟⲙⲟⲥ or ⲓⲱ̅ⲁ ⲡⲓⲣϥϯⲱⲙⲥ[10], Arabic: يحيى‎, translit. Yaḥyā[11]) was a Jewish
Jewish
itinerant preacher[12] in the early first century AD. John is revered as a major religious figure[13] in Christianity, Islam, the Bahá'í Faith,[14] and Mandaeism. He is called a prophet by all of these traditions, and is honored as a saint in many Christian
Christian
traditions. Other titles for John include John the Forerunner in Eastern Christianity
Christianity
and "the prophet John" (Yaḥyā) in Islam
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Sphinx
A sphinx (Ancient Greek: Σφίγξ [spʰíŋks], Boeotian: Φίξ [pʰíːks], plural sphinxes or sphinges) is a mythical creature with the head of a human and the body of a lion. In Greek tradition, it has the head of a human, the haunches of a lion, and sometimes the wings of a bird. It is mythicised as treacherous and merciless. Those who cannot answer its riddle suffer a fate typical in such mythological stories, as they are killed and eaten by this ravenous monster.[1] This deadly version of a sphinx appears in the myth and drama of Oedipus.[2] Unlike the Greek sphinx, which was a woman, the Egyptian sphinx is typically shown as a man (an androsphinx). In addition, the Egyptian sphinx was viewed as benevolent, but having a ferocious strength similar to the malevolent Greek version and both were thought of as guardians often flanking the entrances to temples.[3] In European decorative art, the sphinx enjoyed a major revival during the Renaissance
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Institut De France
The Institut de France
France
(French pronunciation: ​[ɛ̃stity də fʁɑ̃s], Institute of France) is a French learned society, grouping five académies, the most famous of which is the Académie française. The Institute, located in Paris, manages approximately 1,000 foundations, as well as museums and châteaux open for visit
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Père Lachaise Cemetery
Père Lachaise Cemetery
Cemetery
(French: Cimetière du Père-Lachaise, [simtjɛːʁ dy pɛːʁ laʃɛːz]; formerly, cimetière de l'Est, " Cemetery
Cemetery
of the East") is the largest cemetery in the city of Paris (44 hectares or 110 acres),[1] although there are larger cemeteries in the city's suburbs. Père Lachaise is in the 20th arrondissement and is notable for being the first garden cemetery, as well as the first municipal cemetery.[2] It is also the site of three World War I
World War I
memorials. The cemetery is on Boulevard de Mènilmontant. The Paris Métro station Philippe Auguste on line 2 is next to the main entrance, while the station named Père Lachaise, on both lines 2 and 3, is 500 metres away near a side entrance that has been closed to the public
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Alphonse De Lamartine
Alphonse Marie Louis de Prat de Lamartine, Knight of Pratz (French: [alfɔ̃s maʁi lwi dəpʁa də lamaʁtin]; 21 October 1790 – 28 February 1869), was a French writer, poet and politician who was instrumental in the foundation of the Second Republic and the continuation of the Tricolore as the flag of France.Contents1 Biography1.1 Early years 1.2 Political career 1.3 Final years and legacy2 Other interests 3 Religious belief3.1 On the spirit of the times 3.2 On Catholic priests 3.3 On Muhammad4 Bibliography 5 See also 6 References 7 Further reading 8 External linksBiography[edit] Early years[edit] Lamartine was born in Mâcon, Burgundy, on 21 October 1790.[1] His family were members of the French provincial nobility, and he spent his youth at the family estate. Lamartine is famous for his partly autobiographical poem, "Le lac" ("The Lake"), which describes in retrospect the fervent love shared by a couple from the point of view of the bereaved man
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Public Domain
The public domain consists of all the creative works to which no exclusive intellectual property rights apply
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Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition
The Encyclopædia Britannica
Encyclopædia Britannica
Eleventh Edition (1910–11) is a 29-volume reference work, an edition of the Encyclopædia Britannica. It was developed during the encyclopaedia's transition from a British to an American publication. Some of its articles were written by the best-known scholars of the time. This edition of the encyclopedia, containing 40,000 entries, is now in the public domain; and many of its articles have been used as a basis for articles in.[1] However, the outdated nature of some of its content makes its use as a source for modern scholarship problematic
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Special
Special
Special
or the specials or variation, may refer to:.mw-parser-output .tocright float:right;clear:right;width:auto;background:none;padding:.5em 0 .8em 1.4em;margin-bottom:.5em .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-left clear:left .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-both clear:both .mw-parser-output .tocright-clear-none clear:none Contents1 Policing 2 Literature 3 Film and television 4 Music4.1 Albums 4.2 Songs5 Computing 6 Other uses 7 See alsoPolicing[edit] Specials, Ulster
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