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Alexander II Of Macedon
Alexander II of Macedon
Macedon
(Greek: Ἀλέξανδρος Β΄) was king of Macedon
Macedon
in 371–369 BC, following the death of his father Amyntas III.Contents1 Family 2 Reign 3 Sources 4 External linksFamily[edit] He was the eldest of the three sons of king Amyntas and Queen Eurydice I. Reign[edit] Although he had already attained his majority, Alexander was very young when he ascended to the throne in 371 BC. This caused immediate problems for the new king as enemies to the dynasty resumed war. Alexander simultaneously faced an Illyrian invasion from the north-west and an attack from the east by the pretender Pausanias. Pausanias quickly captured several cities and threatened the queen mother, who was at the palace in Pella
Pella
with her young sons
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Thebes, Greece
Thebes (/θiːbz/; Ancient Greek: Θῆβαι, Thēbai, Greek pronunciation: [tʰɛ̂ːbai̯];[2] Greek: Θήβα, Thíva [ˈθiva]) is a city in Boeotia, central Greece. It played an important role in Greek myths, as the site of the stories of Cadmus, Oedipus, Dionysus
Dionysus
and others. Archaeological excavations in and around Thebes have revealed a Mycenaean settlement and clay tablets written in the Linear B
Linear B
script, indicating the importance of the site in the Bronze Age. Thebes was the largest city of the ancient region of Boeotia
Boeotia
and was the leader of the Boeotian confederacy. It was a major rival of ancient Athens, and sided with the Persians during the 480 BC invasion under Xerxes. Theban forces under the command of Epaminondas ended the power of Sparta
Sparta
at the Battle of Leuctra
Battle of Leuctra
in 371 BC
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Athens
Athens
Athens
(/ˈæθɪnz/;[3] Greek: Αθήνα, Athína [aˈθina], Ancient Greek: Ἀθῆναι, Athênai [a.tʰɛ̂ː.nai̯]) is the capital and largest city of Greece
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William Smith (lexicographer)
Sir William Smith (20 May 1813 – 7 October 1893)[1] was an English lexicographer. He also made advances in the teaching of Greek and Latin in schools.Contents1 Early life 2 Career2.1 Publications3 Honours and death 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksEarly life[edit] Smith was born in Enfield in 1813 of Nonconformist
Nonconformist
parents. He attended the Madras House school of John Allen in Hackney.[2] Originally destined for a theological career, he instead was articled to a solicitor. In his spare time he taught himself classics, and when he entered University College London
University College London
he carried off both the Greek and Latin prizes
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Pelopidas
Pelopidas
Pelopidas
(/pəˈlɒpɪdəs/; Greek: Πελοπίδας; died 364 BC) was an important Theban statesman and general in Greece.Contents1 Biography1.1 Athlete and warrior 1.2 Boeotarch 1.3 Thessalian campaign and death2 ReferencesBiography[edit] Athlete and warrior[edit] Pelopidas
Pelopidas
setting out for ThebesHe was a member of a distinguished family, and possessed great wealth which he expended on his friends, while content to lead the life of an athlete. In 384 BC he served in a Theban contingent sent to the support of the Spartans at Mantineia, where he was saved, when dangerously wounded, by the Arcadians. According to Plutarch's Life of Pelopidas
Pelopidas
(paired with the Life of Marcellus), he ruined his inherited estate by showing constant care for the deserving poor of Thebes, taking pleasure in simple clothing, a spare diet, and the constant hardships of military life
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Ancient Greece
Ancient Greece
Greece
was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history from the Greek Dark Ages
Greek Dark Ages
of the 13th–9th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (c. 600 AD). Immediately following this period was the beginning of the Early Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and the Byzantine
Byzantine
era.[1] Roughly three centuries after the Late Bronze Age collapse
Late Bronze Age collapse
of Mycenaean Greece, Greek urban poleis began to form in the 8th century BC, ushering in the period of Archaic Greece
Archaic Greece
and colonization of the Mediterranean Basin. This was followed by the period of Classical Greece, an era that began with the Greco-Persian Wars, lasting from the 5th to 4th centuries BC
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Larissa
Larissa
Larissa
(Greek: Λάρισα [ˈlarisa]) is the capital and largest city of the Thessaly
Thessaly
region, the fifth-most populous in Greece
Greece
and capital of the Larissa
Larissa
regional unit. It is a principal agricultural centre and a national transport hub, linked by road and rail with the port of Volos, the cities of Thessaloniki
Thessaloniki
and Athens
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Thessaly
Thessaly
Thessaly
(Greek: Θεσσαλία, Thessalía; ancient Thessalian: Πετθαλία, Petthalía) is a traditional geographic and modern administrative region of Greece, comprising most of the ancient region of the same name. Before the Greek Dark Ages, Thessaly
Thessaly
was known as Aeolia (Greek: Αἰολία, Aíolía), and appears thus in Homer's Odyssey. Thessaly
Thessaly
became part of the modern Greek state in 1881, after four and a half centuries of Ottoman rule. Since 1987 it has formed one of the country's 13 regions[2] and is further (since the Kallikratis reform of 2010) sub-divided into 5 regional units and 25 municipalities. The capital of the region is Larissa
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Amphipolis
Amphipolis
Amphipolis
(Greek: Αμφίπολη - Amfipoli; Ancient Greek: Ἀμφίπολις, Amphípolis) [2] is best known for being a magnificent ancient Greek polis (city), and later a Roman city, whose impressive remains can still be seen. It is famous in history for events such as the battle between the Spartans and Athenians in 422 BC, and also as the place where Alexander the Great
Alexander the Great
prepared for campaigns leading to his invasion of Asia.[3] Alexander's three finest admirals, Nearchus, Androsthenes and Laomedon, resided in this city and it is also the place where, after Alexander's death, his wife Roxane and their small son Alexander IV were exiled and later murdered. Excavations in and around the city have revealed important buildings, ancient walls and tombs. The finds are displayed at the archaeological museum of Amphıpolıs
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Little, Brown And Company
Little, Brown and Company
Little, Brown and Company
is an American publisher founded in 1837 by Charles Coffin Little and his partner, James Brown, and for close to two centuries has published fiction and nonfiction by American authors. Early lists featured Little Women
Little Women
by Louisa May Alcott, Emily Dickinson's poetry, and Bartlett's Familiar Quotations. As of 2016, Little, Brown & Company is a division of the Hachette Book Group.[1]Contents1 19th century 2 20th century 3 21st century 4 See also 5 Notes and references5.1 Bibliography6 External links19th century[edit] Little, Brown and Company
Little, Brown and Company
had its roots in the book selling trade
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Iphicrates
Iphicrates Greek: Ιφικράτης (c. 418 BC – c. 353 BC) was an Athenian general, the son of a shoemaker, who flourished in the earlier half of the 4th century BC. He owes his fame as much to the improvements he made in the equipment of the peltasts or light-armed mercenaries (named for their small pelte shield) as to his military successes. Historians have debated about just what kind of "peltasts" were affected by his reforms; one of the most popular positions is that he improved the performance of the Greek skirmishers so that they would be able to engage in prolonged hand-to-hand fighting as part of the main battle line, while another strong opinion posits that he worked his changes upon the mercenary hoplites that were an important factor in late 5th and early 4th century B.C
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Pella
Pella
Pella
(Greek: Πέλλα, Pélla), is an ancient city located in Central Macedonia, Greece, best known as the historical capital of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon
Macedon
and birthplace of Alexander the Great
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Pausanias (pretender)
Pausanias (Greek: Παυσανίας), also known as Pausanias the Pretender, was a Macedonian who claimed the right the Macedonian throne in the 360's B.C., during the time of Philip II of Macedon.This Ancient Greek biographical article is a stub
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Illyria
In classical antiquity, Illyria
Illyria
(Ancient Greek: Ἰλλυρία, Illyría or Ἰλλυρίς, Illyrís;[1][2] Latin: Illyria,[3] see also Illyricum) was a region in the western part of the Balkan Peninsula inhabited by the Illyrians. The prehistory of Illyria
Illyria
and the Illyrians
Illyrians
is known from archaeological evidence
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Ancient Greek
The Ancient Greek language
Greek language
includes the forms of Greek used in ancient Greece
Greece
and the ancient world from around the 9th century BC to the 6th century AD. It is often roughly divided into the Archaic period (9th to 6th centuries BC), Classical period (5th and 4th centuries BC), and Hellenistic period
Hellenistic period
(Koine Greek, 3rd century BC to the 4th century AD). It is antedated in the second millennium BC by Mycenaean Greek and succeeded by medieval Greek. Koine is regarded as a separate historical stage of its own, although in its earliest form it closely resembled Attic Greek
Attic Greek
and in its latest form it approaches Medieval Greek
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Eurydice I Of Macedon
In Greek mythology, Eurydice
Eurydice
(/jʊəˈrɪdɪsi/; Greek: Εὐρυδίκη, Eurydikē) was an oak nymph or one of the daughters of Apollo
Apollo
(the god of music, prophecy, and light, who also drove the sun chariot, "adopting" the power as god of the Sun from the primordial god Helios). She was the wife of Orpheus, who tried to bring her back from the dead with his enchanting music. Canonical story[edit] Eurydice
Eurydice
was the wife of Orpheus, who loved her dearly; on their wedding day, he played joyful songs as his bride danced through the meadow. One day, Aristaeus
Aristaeus
saw and pursued Eurydice, who stepped on a viper, was bitten, and died instantly
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