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Alexander Calder
Alexander Calder
Alexander Calder
(/ˈkɔːldər/; July 22, 1898 – November 11, 1976) is widely considered to be one of the most important American sculptors of the 20th century. He is best known for his colorful, whimsical abstract public sculptures and his innovative mobiles, kinetic sculptures powered by motors or air currents, which embraced chance in their aesthetic. Born into a family of accomplished artists, Calder's work first gained attention in Paris in the 1930s and was soon championed by the Museum of Modern Art
Museum of Modern Art
in New York, resulting in a retrospective exhibition in 1943. Major retrospectives were also held at the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum
(1964) and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago (1974)
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Draughtsman
A drafter, draughtsman (British English) or draftsman, drafting technician ( American English
American English
and Canadian English) is a person who makes detailed technical drawings or plans for machinery, buildings, electronics, infrastructure, sections, etc. Drafters use computer software and manual sketches to convert the designs, plans, and layouts of engineers and architects into a set of technical drawings. Drafters operate as the supporting developers and sketch engineering designs and drawings from preliminary design concepts.Contents1 Overview 2 Specialities 3 Employment and work environment 4 Education and training 5 See also 6 ReferencesOverview[edit] In the past, drafters sat at drawing boards and used pencils, pens, compasses, protractors, triangles, and other drafting devices to prepare a drawing by hand
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Germantown Academy
Germantown Academy, informally known as GA and originally known as the Union School, is the oldest nonsectarian day school in the United States. The school was founded on December 6, 1759, by a group of prominent Germantown citizens in the Green Tree Tavern on the Germantown Road.[1] Germantown Academy
Germantown Academy
enrolls students from pre-kindergarten to 12th grade and is located in the Philadelphia suburb of Fort Washington, having moved from its original Germantown campus in 1965. Germantown Academy
Germantown Academy
is considered to be an exclusive private school in terms of admission criteria and is ranked among the top schools in the Philadelphia
Philadelphia
area. Germantown Academy
Germantown Academy
ranks within the nation's top 100 private and public schools that send the most students to the Ivy Leagues
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Académie Julian
The Académie Julian
Académie Julian
(French pronunciation: ​[akademi ʒyljɑ̃])[1] was a private art school for painting and sculpture founded in Paris, France, in 1867 by French painter and teacher Rodolphe Julian
Rodolphe Julian
(1839–1907) that was active from
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Sorbonne
The Sorbonne
Sorbonne
is an edifice of the Latin Quarter, in Paris, France, which was the historical house of the former University of Paris. Today, it houses part or all of several higher education and research institutions such as Sorbonne
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Pennsylvania Academy Of The Fine Arts
The Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
Academy of the Fine Arts is a museum and art school in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. It was founded in 1805 and is the first and oldest art museum and art school in the United States. The academy's museum is internationally known for its collections of 19th- and 20th-century American paintings, sculptures, and works on paper. Its archives house important materials for the study of American art history, museums, and art training.Contents1 History1.1 Women at the Academy2 The Academy today2.1 The Museum 2.2 The School3 Buildings3.1 The Furness-Hewitt building 3.2 Samuel M.V
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UC Berkeley Art Museum
Coordinates: 37°52′07″N 122°15′21″W / 37.86874°N 122.25582°W / 37.86874; -122.25582The new Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive opened in 2016.The former Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive main building on Bancroft Way, designed by Mario Ciampi.[1]Pacific Film Archive Theater at the Hearst AnnexThe Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive (BAM/PFA) are a combined art museum and repertory movie theater and archive, associated with the University of California, Berkeley. The director is Lawrence Rinder who was appointed in 2008.[2] The building underwent updates beginning in 2009 and which finished in 2015. The archive and art museum moved from its original home to a new location on Center Street; the museum opened to the public in January 2016
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Metropolitan Museum Of Art
www.metmuseum.orgThe Metropolitan Museum of ArtU.S. National Register of Historic PlacesU.S. National Historic LandmarkElevation by Simon FieldhouseBuilt 1874; 144 years ago (1874)Architect Richard Morris Hunt; also Calvert Vaux; Jacob Wrey MouldArchitectural style Beaux-ArtsNRHP reference # 86003556Significant datesAdded to NRHP January 29, 1972[5]Designated NHLJune 24, 1986[6] [7]The Metropolitan Museum of Art
Metropolitan Museum of Art
of New York, colloquially "the Met",[a] is the largest art museum in the United States. With 7.06 million visitors in 2016, it was the second most visited art museum in the world, and the fifth most visited museum of any kind. [8] Its permanent collection contains over two million works,[9] divided among seventeen curatorial departments
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Tuberculosis
Tuberculosis
Tuberculosis
(TB) is an infectious disease usually caused by the bacterium Mycobacterium tuberculosis
Mycobacterium tuberculosis
(MTB).[1] Tuberculosis
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Oracle, Arizona
Oracle is a census-designated place (CDP) in Pinal County, Arizona, United States. The population was 3,686 at the 2010 census. Buffalo Bill Cody owned the High Jinks Gold Mine in Oracle briefly and, in 1911, appeared as "Santa" for a group of local children.[3] The community is the location of the Biosphere 2 experiment. Oracle was also the postal address for environmentalist author Edward Abbey, who never lived in the town but visited often. Oracle is becoming a bedroom community for Tucson, Arizona, but large-scale development is opposed by many residents. Oracle State Park is adjacent. The Arizona Trail passes through the Park and community. Oracle is the gateway to the road up the "back side" of Mount Lemmon, which starts off of American Avenue and currently offers a secondary route to the top
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Pasadena, California
Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles
Los Angeles
County, California, United States, located 10 miles (16 kilometers) northeast of Downtown Los Angeles. The estimated population of Pasadena was 139,731, in 2013, making it the 183rd-largest city in the United States.[14] Pasadena is the ninth-largest city in Los Angeles
Los Angeles
County. Pasadena was incorporated on June 19, 1886, becoming one of the first cities to be incorporated in what is now Los Angeles
Los Angeles
County, following the city of Los Angeles (April 4, 1850).[18] It is one of the primary cultural centers of the San Gabriel Valley.[19] The city is known for hosting the annual Rose
Rose
Bowl football game and Tournament of Roses Parade
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Tournament Of Roses Parade
The Rose Parade, also known as the Tournament of Roses Parade, is part of "America's New Year Celebration" held in Pasadena, California
Pasadena, California
each year on New Year's Day
New Year's Day
(or on Monday, January 2 if New Year's Day falls on a Sunday). The parade includes flower-covered floats, marching bands, and equestrian units and is followed by the Rose Bowl college football game
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New York (state)
New York is a state in the northeastern United States. New York was one of the original thirteen colonies that formed the United States. With an estimated 19.85 million residents in 2017,[4] it is the fourth most populous state. To differentiate from its city with the same name, it is sometimes called New York State. The state's most populous city, New York City
New York City
makes up over 40% of the state's population. Two-thirds of the state's population lives in the New York metropolitan area, and nearly 40% lives on Long Island.[9] The state and city were both named for the 17th-century Duke of York, the future King James II of England
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Carl Van Vechten
Carl Van Vechten
Carl Van Vechten
(June 17, 1880 – December 21, 1964) was an American writer and artistic photographer who was a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and the literary executor of Gertrude Stein.[1]Contents1 Life and career 2 Archives and museum collections 3 Works3.1 Posthumous4 Gallery 5 References 6 External linksLife and career[edit] Born in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, he was the youngest child of Charles and Ada Van Vechten.[2]:14 He graduated from Washington High School in 1898,[3] and later the University of Chicago[4] in 1903. In 1906, he moved to New York City. He was hired as the assistant music critic at The New York Times.[5] His interest in opera had him take a leave of absence from the paper in 1907, so as to travel to Europe to explore opera.[1] While in England he married his long-time friend from Cedar Rapids, Anna Snyder
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Everett Shinn
Everett Shinn (November 6, 1876 – May 1, 1953) was an American realist painter and member of the Ashcan School. He also exhibited with the short-lived group known as "The Eight," who protested the restrictive exhibition policies of the powerful, conservative National Academy of Design. He is best known for his robust paintings of urban life in New York and London, a hallmark of Ashcan art, and for his theater and residential murals and interior-design projects. His style varied considerably over the years, from gritty and realistic to decorative and rococo.Contents1 Early life 2 Career 3 New York and The Eight 4 Later life 5 Legacy 6 Gallery 7 Selected Painting Analysis 8 Selected works 9 Selected Exhibitions 10 See also 11 References 12 Sources 13 External linksEarly life[edit]Everett ShinnShinn was born in Woodstown, New Jersey, a large Quaker-dominated community.[1] His parents Isaiah Conklin Shinn and Josephine Ransley Shinn were rural farmers
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Sic
The Latin
Latin
adverb sic ("thus", "just as"; in full: sic erat scriptum, "thus was it written")[1] inserted after a quoted word or passage indicates that the quoted matter has been transcribed exactly as found in the source text, complete with any erroneous or archaic spelling, surprising assertion, faulty reasoning, or other matter that might otherwise be taken as an error of transcription. The usual usage is to inform the reader that any errors or apparent errors in quoted material do not arise from errors in the course of the transcription, but are intentionally reproduced, exactly as they appear in the source text
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