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Alexander Barclay
Dr Alexander Barclay
Alexander Barclay
(c. 1476 – 10 June 1552) was an English/Scottish poet.Contents1 Biography 2 Works 3 Notes 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External linksBiography[edit] Barclay was born in about 1476. His place of birth is matter of dispute, but William Bulleyn, who was a native of Ely, and probably knew him when he was in the monastery there, asserts that he was born "beyonde the cold river of Twede" (River Tweed, i.e. in Scotland). His early life was spent at Croydon, but it is not certain whether he was educated at Oxford
Oxford
or Cambridge. It may be presumed that he took his degree, as he uses the title of "Syr" in his translation of Sallust's Bellum Jugurthinum, and in his will he is called Doctor of Divinity. From the numerous incidental references in his works, and from his knowledge of European literature, it may be inferred that he spent some time abroad
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Robert Chambers (publisher Born 1802)
Anne Kirkwood (m. 1829-1863) (unnamed wife) (m. 1867-1879)[1]Children son: Robert Chambers (1832–88)Relatives mother: Jean Gibson brother: William Chambers (1800–83) granddaughter: Violet TweedaleRobert Chambers FRSE FGS LLD (/ˈtʃeɪmbərz/; 10 July 1802 – 17 March 1871)[2] was a Scottish publisher, geologist, evolutionary thinker, author and journal editor who, like his elder brother and business partner William Chambers, was highly influential in mid-19th century scientific and political circles. Chambers was an early phrenologist and was the anonymous author of Vestiges of the Natural History of Creation, which was so controversial that his authorship was not acknowledged until after his death.Contents1 Early life1.1 Early works2 Marriage 3 W. & R
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Rectory
A clergy house or rectory is the residence, or former residence, of one or more priests or ministers of religion.Contents1 Function 2 Nomenclature 3 Image gallery 4 See also 5 ReferencesFunction[edit] Clergy houses are typically owned and maintained by a church, as a benefit to its clergy. The practice exists in many denominations because of the tendency of clergy to be transferred from one church to another at relatively frequent intervals. Catholic clergy houses in particular may be lived in by several priests from a parish. Clergy houses frequently serve as the administrative office of the local parish as well as a residence; they are normally located next to, or at least close to, the church their occupant serves. Partly because of the general conservationism of churches, many clergy houses are of historic interest or even importance
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Field Of The Cloth Of Gold
The Field of the Cloth of Gold
Field of the Cloth of Gold
(French: Camp du Drap d'Or) was a site in Balinghem – between Ardres
Ardres
in France and Guînes
Guînes
in the then-English Pale of Calais – that hosted a summit from 7 to 24 June 1520, between King Henry VIII of England
Henry VIII of England
and King Francis I of France. The summit was arranged to increase the bond of friendship between the two kings following the Anglo-French treaty of 1514. These two monarchs would meet again in 1532 to arrange Francis's assistance in pressuring Pope Clement VII
Pope Clement VII
to pronounce Henry's first marriage as illegitimate
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Franciscan
The Franciscans
Franciscans
are a group of related mendicant religious orders within the Catholic
Catholic
Church, founded in 1209 by Francis of Assisi. These orders include the Order of Friars Minor, the Order of Saint Clare, and the Third Order
Third Order
of Saint Francis. These orders adhere to the teachings and spiritual disciplines of the founder and of his main associates and followers, such as Clare of Assisi, Anthony of Padua, and Elizabeth of Hungary, among many others.[2] Francis began preaching around 1207 and traveled to Rome
Rome
to seek approval from Pope Innocent III
Pope Innocent III
in 1209 to form a new religious order. The original Rule of Saint Francis approved by the Pope
Pope
disallowed ownership of property, requiring members of the order to beg for food while preaching
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Canterbury
Canterbury
Canterbury
(/ˈkæntərbri/ ( listen), /-bəri/, or /-bɛri/)[3] is a historic English cathedral city and UNESCO World Heritage Site, which lies at the heart of the City of Canterbury, a local government district of Kent, England. It lies on the River Stour. The Archbishop of Canterbury
Archbishop of Canterbury
is the primate of the Church of England and the worldwide Anglican Communion
Anglican Communion
owing to the importance of St Augustine, who served as the apostle to the pagan Kingdom of Kent around the turn of the 7th century. The city's cathedral became a major focus of pilgrimage following the 1170 martyrdom of Thomas Becket, although it had already been a well-trodden pilgrim destination since the murder of St Alphege
Alphege
by the men of King Canute in 1012
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Edward VI Of England
Edward VI (12 October 1537 – 6 July 1553) was King of England
King of England
and Ireland from 28 January 1547 until his death. He was crowned on 20 February at the age of nine.[1] Edward was the son of Henry VIII
Henry VIII
and Jane Seymour, and England's first monarch to be raised as a Protestant. During his reign, the realm was governed by a Regency Council because he never reached his majority. The Council was first led by his uncle Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset
Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset
(1547–1549), and then by John Dudley, 1st Earl of Warwick
Earl of Warwick
(1550–1553), from 1551 Duke of Northumberland. Edward's reign was marked by economic problems and social unrest that in 1549 erupted into riot and rebellion
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Great Baddow
Great Baddow
Great Baddow
is an urban village and civil parish in the Chelmsford borough of Essex, England. It is close to the county town, Chelmsford and, with a population of over 13,000,[2] is one of the largest villages in the country. Great Baddow's name is believed to have been derived from the River Beadwan, now known as the River Chelmer, which marks the northern boundary of the village. Beadwan is thought to be a Celtic word of uncertain meaning,[3] possibly "birch stream" or a reference to the goddess Badbh.[2] The centre of Great Baddow
Great Baddow
is now a Conservation Area and contains over 30 listed buildings.Contents1 Development 2 Schools 3 Geology 4 History 5 Nearby villages include 6 External links 7 ReferencesDevelopment[edit] During the early part of the 20th century, Great Baddow
Great Baddow
grew through ribbon development towards Chelmsford
Chelmsford
and Galleywood
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Essex
Essex
Essex
/ˈɛsɪks/ is a county in the East of England. Immediately north east of London, it is one of the home counties. It borders the counties of Suffolk
Suffolk
and Cambridgeshire
Cambridgeshire
to the north, Hertfordshire
Hertfordshire
to the west, Kent
Kent
across the estuary of the River Thames
River Thames
to the south and London
London
to the south-west. The county town is Chelmsford, which is the only city in the county. Essex
Essex
occupies the eastern part of the former Kingdom of Essex, which subsequently united with the other Anglian and Saxon
Saxon
kingdoms to make England
England
a single nation state
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Somerset
Somerset
Somerset
(/ˈsʌmərsɛt/ ( listen)) (or archaically, Somersetshire) is a county in South West England
England
which borders Gloucestershire
Gloucestershire
and Bristol
Bristol
to the north, Wiltshire
Wiltshire
to the east, Dorset
Dorset
to the south-east and Devon
Devon
to the south-west. It is bounded to the north and west by the Severn Estuary
Severn Estuary
and the Bristol
Bristol
Channel, its coastline facing southeastern Wales
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Dean (religion)
A dean, in a church context, is a cleric holding certain positions of authority within a religious hierarchy. The title is used mainly in the Anglican Communion, the Roman Catholic Church, and many Lutheran denominations. A dean's assistant is called a subdean.Contents1 Officials 2 Anglican Communion2.1 Cathedrals 2.2 Rural or area deaneries 2.3 Other uses3 Catholic Church 4 Lutheran Church 5 United Methodism 6 Other uses 7 See also 8 ReferencesOfficials[edit] In the church, the Dean of the College of Cardinals
Dean of the College of Cardinals
and the Cardinal Vice-Dean are the president and vice-president of the college. Both are elected. Except for presiding and delegating administrative tasks, they have no authority over the cardinals, acting as primus inter pares (first among equals). In the academic community, the Dean is the academic leader of the Faculty who presides over the Faculty Board and administration
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Chapter (religion)
A chapter (Latin: capitulum [1] or capitellum) [2] is one of several bodies of clergy in Roman Catholic, Anglican, and Nordic Lutheran churches or their gatherings.Contents1 Name 2 Cathedral chapter 3 Collegiate chapter 4 General chapter 5 Chapter of faults 6 Orders of knighthood 7 Notes 8 References 9 Further readingName[edit] The name derives from the habit of convening monks or canons for the reading of a chapter of the Bible
Bible
or a heading of the order's rule.[2] The 6th-century St Benedict directed that his monks begin their daily assemblies with such readings[1] and ove
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All Hallows Lombard Street
Coordinates: 51°30′44″N 0°05′08″W / 51.5122°N 0.0855°W / 51.5122; -0.0855All Hallows Lombard Street All Hallows Lombard Street
All Hallows Lombard Street
in the 1820sLocation Lombard Street, LondonCountry EnglandDenomination AnglicanPrevious denomination Roman CatholicArchitectureDemolished 1937 All Hallows Lombard Street
All Hallows Lombard Street
was a parish church in the City of London. It stood in Lombard Street near the corner with Gracechurch Street,[1] in Langbourn
Langbourn
Ward,[2] The west end faced into Ball Alley. Of medieval origin, it was rebuilt following the Great Fire of London
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Henry VIII Of England
Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England from 21 April 1509 until his death. Henry was the second Tudor monarch, succeeding his father, Henry VII. Henry is best known for his six marriages and, in particular, his efforts to have his first marriage, to Catherine of Aragon, annulled. His disagreement with the Pope on the question of such an annulment led Henry to initiate the English Reformation, separating the Church of England from papal authority. He appointed himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England
Church of England
and dissolved convents and monasteries. Despite his resulting excommunication, Henry remained a believer in core Catholic
Catholic
theological teachings.[2] Domestically, Henry is known for his radical changes to the English Constitution, ushering in the theory of the divine right of kings to England
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Preferment
A pre-ferment (also known as bread starter) is a fermentation starter used in indirect[1][2] methods of bread making. It may also be called mother dough. A pre-ferment and a longer fermentation in the bread-making process have several benefits: there is more time for yeast, enzyme and, if sourdough, bacterial actions on the starch and proteins in the dough; this in turn improves the keeping time of the baked bread, and it creates greater complexities of flavor
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English Language
English is a West Germanic language
West Germanic language
that was first spoken in early medieval England
England
and is now a global lingua franca.[4][5] Named after the Angles, one of the Germanic tribes that migrated to England, it ultimately derives its name from the Anglia (Angeln) peninsula in the Baltic Sea. It is closely related to the Frisian languages, but its vocabulary has been significantly influenced by other Germanic languages, particularly Norse (a North Germanic
North Germanic
language), as well as by Latin
Latin
and Romance languages, especially French.[6] English has developed over the course of more than 1,400 years. The earliest forms of English, a set of Anglo-Frisian dialects brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers in the 5th century, are called Old English
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