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Alessandro De' Medici
Alessandro de' Medici
Medici
(22 July 1510 – 6 January 1537) called "il Moro" ("the Moor"), Duke
Duke
of Penne and also Duke of Florence
Duke of Florence
(from 1532), was ruler of Florence
Florence
from 1531 until 1537. Although born out-of-wedlock, he was the last member of the "senior" branch of the Medici
Medici
to rule Florence
Florence
and the first to rule as a hereditary duke.Contents1 Life 2 Death 3 References 4 Sources 5 External linksLife[edit] Born in Florence, he was recognized by the majority of his contemporaries[1] as the only son of Lorenzo II de' Medici
Medici
(grandson of Lorenzo de' Medici
Medici
"the Magnificent")
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Duke
A duke (male) (British English: /djuːk/[1] or American English: /duːk/[2]) or duchess (female) can either be a monarch ruling over a duchy or a member of the nobility, historically of highest rank below the monarch. The title comes from French duc, itself from the Latin dux, 'leader', a term used in republican Rome to refer to a military commander without an official rank (particularly one of Germanic or Celtic origin), and later coming to mean the leading military commander of a province. The title dux survived in the Eastern Roman Empire
Eastern Roman Empire
where it was used in several contexts signifying a rank equivalent to a captain or general. Later on, in the 11th century, the title Megas Doux
Megas Doux
was introduced for the post of commander-in-chief of the entire navy. During the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
the title (as Herzog) signified first among the Germanic monarchies
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Palleschi
The palleschi, also known as bigi, were partisans of the Medici
Medici
family in Florence. The name derived by the Medici
Medici
coat-of-arms, bearing six 'balls' (palle). Massimo D'Azeglio, Italian writer and historian, in his Niccolò de' Lapi, or the Palleschi
Palleschi
and the Piagnoni (1866), [1] wrote explicitly: "the part of the citizens which improved their reputation and got rich under the Medici...
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Christopher Hibbert
Christopher Hibbert (born Arthur Raymond Hibbert) MC (5 March 1924 – 21 December 2008), was an English author, historian and biographer. He has been called "a pearl of biographers" (New Statesman) and "probably the most widely-read popular historian of our time and undoubtedly one of the most prolific" (The Times).[1] Hibbert was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature
Royal Society of Literature
and the author of many books, including The Story of England, Disraeli, Edward VII, George IV, The Rise and Fall of the House of Medici, and Cavaliers and Roundheads.Contents1 Biography 2 Personal life 3 Works 4 References 5 Further readingBiography[edit] In 1924 Arthur Raymond Hibbert was born in Enderby, Leicestershire, the son of Canon H. V. Hibbert (died 1980) and his wife Maude
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Uffizi
The Uffizi
Uffizi
Gallery (Italian: Galleria degli Uffizi, pronounced [ɡalleˈriːa deʎʎ ufˈfittsi]) is a prominent art museum located adjacent to the Piazza della Signoria
Piazza della Signoria
in the Historic Centre of Florence
Florence
in the region of Tuscany, Italy. One of the most important Italian museums, and the most visited, it is also one of the largest and best known in the world, and holds a collection of priceless works, particularly from the period of the Italian Renaissance. After the ruling house of Medici died out, their art collections were gifted to the city of Florence
Florence
under the famous Patto di famiglia negotiated by Anna Maria Luisa, the last Medici heiress. The Uffizi
Uffizi
is one of the first modern museums
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Regent
A regent (from the Latin
Latin
regens,[1] "[one] ruling"[2]) is "a person appointed to administer a state because the monarch is a minor, is absent or is incapacitated."[3] The rule of a regent or regents is called a regency. A regent or regency council may be formed ad hoc or in accordance with a constitutional rule. "Regent" is sometimes a formal title. If the regent is holding his position due to his position in the line of succession, the compound term prince regent is often used; if the regent of a minor is his mother, she is often referred to as "queen regent". If the formally appointed regent is unavailable or cannot serve on a temporary basis, a Regent
Regent
ad interim may be appointed to fill the gap. In a monarchy, a regent usually governs due to one of these reasons, but may also be elected to rule during the interregnum when the royal line has died out
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Out-of-wedlock
Legitimacy, in traditional Western common law, is the status of a child born to parents who are legally married to each other, and of a child conceived before the parents obtain a legal divorce. Conversely, illegitimacy (or bastardy) has been the status of a child born outside marriage, such a child being known as a bastard, or love child, when such a distinction has been made from other children. Depending on local legislation, legitimacy can affect a child's rights of inheritance to the putative father's estate and the child's right to bear the father's surname or hereditary title
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Penne, Abruzzo
Penne (Italian pronunciation: [ˈpɛnne]) (Pònne in the local dialect) is an Italian town in the province of Pescara, in the Abruzzo region, in mid-southern Italy. According to the last census in 2014 the population was 12,451.[1] In 2012 Penne was selected as one of the "Most Beautiful Towns of Italy" (Borghi più belli d'Italia) [2] Penne is today among the most important towns in the Vestini
Vestini
area, sitting in the hills between the Apennine Mountains
Apennine Mountains
and the Adriatic Sea and opening the way for the National Park of Gran Sasso and Monti della Laga through the Regional Natural Reserve "Lake of Penne". The widespread use of bricks in every historical building and paving gave Penne the appellation of “Città del mattone”, i.e. the "Town of bricks"
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Moors
The term "Moors" refers primarily to the Muslim
Muslim
inhabitants of the Maghreb, the Iberian Peninsula, Sicily, and Malta
Malta
during the Middle Ages
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Catholicism
The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the largest Christian church, with more than 1.29 billion members worldwide.[4] As one of the oldest religious institutions in the world, it has played a prominent role in the history and development of Western civilisation.[5] Headed by the Bishop of Rome, known as the Pope, the church's doctrines are summarised in the Nicene Creed
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Valladolid
Valladolid
Valladolid
(/ˌvælədəˈliːd, -ˈlɪd, bɑːjədəˈliːd/; Spanish: [baʎaðoˈlið] ( listen)) is a city in Spain and the de facto capital of the autonomous community of Castile and León. It has a population of 309,714 people (2013 est.),[2] making it Spain's 13th most populous municipality and northwestern Spain's biggest city. Its metropolitan area ranks 20th in Spain
Spain
with a population of 414,244 people in 23 municipalities. The city is situated at the confluence of the Pisuerga and Esgueva rivers 15 km before they join the Duero, and located within five winegrowing regions: Ribera del Duero, Rueda, Toro, Tierra de León, and Cigales. Valladolid
Valladolid
was originally settled in pre-Roman times by the Celtic Vaccaei
Vaccaei
people, and later the Romans themselves
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Venice
Venice
Venice
(/ˈvɛnɪs/, VEN-iss; Italian: Venezia, [veˈnɛttsja] ( listen); Venetian: Venesia, [veˈnɛsja]) is a city in northeastern Italy
Italy
and the capital of the Veneto
Veneto
region. It is situated across a group of 118 small islands[1] that are separated by canals and linked by bridges, of which there are 400.[2][3] The islands are located in the shallow Venetian Lagoon, an enclosed bay that lies between the mouths of the Po and the Piave Rivers. Parts of Venice
Venice
are renowned for the beauty of their settings, their architecture, and artwork.[2] The lagoon and a part of the city are listed as a World Heritage Site.[2] In 2014, 264,579 people resided in Comune
Comune
di Venezia, of whom around 55,000 live in the historic city of Venice
Venice
(Centro storico)
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International Standard Book Number
The International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a numeric commercial book identifier which is intended to be unique.[a][b] Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each separate edition and variation (except reprintings) of a publication. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book will each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is ten digits long if assigned before 2007, and thirteen digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007. The method of assigning an ISBN is nation-specific and varies between countries, often depending on how large the publishing industry is within a country. The initial ISBN identification format was devised in 1967, based upon the 9-digit Standard Book
Book
Numbering (SBN) created in 1966
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Michelangelo
Michelangelo
Michelangelo
di Lodovico Buonarroti Simoni or more commonly known by his first name Michelangelo
Michelangelo
(/ˌmaɪkəlˈændʒəloʊ/; Italian: [mikeˈlandʒelo di lodoˈviːko
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992
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Ferdinand Schevill
Ferdinand Schevill (1868–1954) was an American historian. He graduated from Yale University
Yale University
in 1889 and finished his PhD
PhD
at Freiburg
Freiburg
in 1892. That same year he arrived at the University of Chicago, where he taught from 1892 to 1937. Schevill’s first book, a textbook on Western European history, was "Political History of Europe from 1500 to the Present Day". It was revised and republished many times. In 1922 he published "The History of the Balkan Peninsula: From the Earliest Times to the Present Day".[1] Schevill retired in 1924. In 1930 he reentered the University in the Humanities General Course of general education. He retired five years later to finish "The History of Florence" (1936). Schevill continued to research, and in his eightieth year he went from the University of Chicago
University of Chicago
to lecture in Frankfurt
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